Počet produktů: 103

Zobrazení 16-30 z 103 položek

Rostlina odolná vůči mrazu a mrazu
Purple Apple Berry Seeds (Billardiera longiflora) 2.5 - 5

Purple Apple Berry Seeds...

Cena 2,50 € (SKU: V 31)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Purple Apple Berry Seeds (Billardiera longiflora)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Purple Apple Berry, also known as the Mountain Blue Berry, is a small vine native to the cool, moist forests of Australia. The wonderfully shiny, edible purple fruit start off white; becoming fully ripe in early winter after the greenish-yellow tubular trumpet-flowers are pollinated. The fruits are best harvested in late summer, before becoming over ripened.</p> <p>Tasting similar to apples, hence the name, these unusual plants are wonderful eaten raw or even fried and spiced. Ideally grown along trellis, or allowed to climb other plants, the purple apple berry is a hardy (withstanding temperatures as low as -5°C / 23°F), sun loving plant that appreciates being sheltered from high winds. Accustomed to moist, well drained soil, the Billardiera Longiflora is a Royal Horticultural Society Garden Merit Award Winner.<span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000; font-size: 12pt;"></span></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Sowing Instructions:</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Sow in trays or pots on the surface of a mix of two-thirds peat based compost, eg. Levington and one third sand, and just cover the seed with a sprinkling of sieved compost or vermiculite.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Place in a propagator or seal inside a polythene bag and maintain an optimum temperature of 15-18C . </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Germination should take place in 30-60 days .</span></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">PROPAGATION-SMOKE TREATMENT</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Smoke treatment is absolutely essential for some Australian native plants and greatly improves germination in others. Simply put, the chemicals in smoke 'break' the seed's dormancy which is the first stage of germination - no smoke, no germination!</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">There are several methods of smoke treatment short of lighting a bushfire in your backyard. The simplest method is to sow the seed and cover them with smoke impregnated vermiculite as part of the sowing process. When you water, the chemicals are slowly leached out of the vermiculite and bathe the seed in smoke chemicals.</span></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Growing Instructions:</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Transplant seedlings when large enough to handle into 7.5cm pots. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Over-winter at a temperature of about 5C. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Harden off and plant out when all risk of frost has passed in full sun or semi-shade. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Will be ok outside in mild areas but protect in cold areas with fleece or by maintaining in a container and over-wintering in a frost free place</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 31 (3 S)
Purple Apple Berry Seeds (Billardiera longiflora) 2.5 - 5

Cucamelon seeds - Mexican Sour Gherkin Cucumber 1.85 - 1

Mexická mini okurka semena...

Cena 1,85 € (SKU: PK 19)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Mexická mini okurka semena (Melothria scabra)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Cena za balení 5 nebo 10 semen.</strong></span></h2> <p>Jedná se o popínavou rostlinu, která dosahuje výšky až 2 m. Lze ji pěstovat na venkovním záhoně, ale i ve skleníku. Případně je možné ji pěstovat ve velkém kontejneru na balkóně.</p> <p>Rostlina se bujně rozrůstá a vytváří dlouhé šlahouny. Postupně obrůstá krásnými žlutými květy, ze kterých postupně vznikají drobné plody, které tvarem i barvou připomínají maličké melouny.</p> <p>Odrůda je velmi výnosná. Jedna rostlina je schopna vyprodukovat opravdu velké množství plodů. Zralé plody jsou křupavé a dosahují velikosti 2–4 cm.</p> <p>Plody mají sladkokyselou chuť, jsou velmi osvěžující a zpracovávat se dají jako jiné okurky. Jsou vhodné k přímé konzumaci, ale i ke konzervaci.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
PK 19 (5 S)
Cucamelon seeds - Mexican Sour Gherkin Cucumber 1.85 - 1
Indian cress or Monks cress Seed – Edible 2 - 3

Indian cress or Monks cress...

Cena 2,00 € (SKU: MHS 53)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Indian cress or Monks cress Seed – Edible</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Tropaeolum majus (garden nasturtium, Indian cress or monks cress) is a flowering plant in the family Tropaeolaceae, originating in the Andes from Bolivia north to Colombia. The species has become naturalized in parts of the United States (California, New York, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut).[3] It is of cultivated, probably hybrid origin, with possible parent species including T. minus, T. moritzianum, T. peltophorum, and T. peregrinum.[4][5] It is not closely related to the genus Nasturtium (which includes watercress).</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>It is a herbaceous annual plant with trailing stems growing to 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) long or more. The leaves are large, nearly circular, 3 to 15 centimetres (1.2 to 5.9 in) diameter, green to glaucous green above, paler below; they are peltate, with the 5–30 cm long petiole near the middle of the leaf, with several veins radiating to the smoothly rounded or slightly lobed margin. The flowers are 2.5–6 cm diameter, with five petals, eight stamens, and a 2.5–3 cm long nectar spur at the rear; they vary from yellow to orange to red, frilled and often darker at the base of the petals. The fruit is 2 cm broad, three-segmented, each segment with a single large seed 1–1.5 cm long.</p> <p><strong>Das Elisabeth Linné-Phänomen</strong></p> <p>Das Elisabeth Linné-Phänomen, or the Elizabeth Linnæus Phenomenon, is the name given to the phenomenon of "Flashing Flowers".[8] Especially at dusk, the orange flowers may appear to emit small "flashes". Once believed to be an electrical phenomenon, it is today thought to be an optical reaction in the human eye caused by the contrast between the orange flowers and the surrounding green. The phenomenon is named after Elisabeth Christina von Linné, one of Carl Linnaeus's daughters, who discovered it at age 19.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation and uses</strong></p> <p>It is widely cultivated, both as an ornamental plant and as a medicinal plant.</p> <p>It is listed as invasive in several areas, including Hawaii, Lord Howe Island, New Zealand.</p> <p><strong>Culinary</strong></p> <p>All its parts are edible. The flower has most often been consumed, making for an especially ornamental salad ingredient; it has a slightly peppery taste reminiscent of watercress, and is also used in stir fry. The flowers contain about 130 mg vitamin C per 100 grams (3.5 oz),[10] about the same amount as is contained in parsley.[11] Moreover, they contain up to 45 mg of lutein per 100 gr,[12] which is the highest amount found in any edible plant. The unripe seed pods can be harvested and dropped into spiced vinegar to produce a condiment and garnish, sometimes used in place of capers.</p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>The garden nasturtium is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the Dot Moth[14] and the Garden Carpet Moth.[15] A very common pest found on nasturtiums is the caterpillar of the Large White (Cabbage White) Butterfly.</p> <p><strong>Companion plants</strong></p> <p>Nasturtiums are also considered widely useful companion plants. They repel a great many cucurbit pests, like squash bugs, cucumber beetles, and several caterpillars. They have a similar range of benefits for brassica plants, especially broccoli and cauliflower. They also serve as a trap crop against black fly aphids. They also attract beneficial predatory insects.</p>
MHS 53
Indian cress or Monks cress Seed – Edible 2 - 3

Odrůda z Indie
Gac Exotic Fruit Seeds (Momordica cochinchinensis)

Gac Exotic Fruit Seeds...

Cena 3,85 € (SKU: P 139)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Gac Exotic Fruit Seeds (Momordica cochinchinensis) Exotic Vegetable</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Aril the consumer to prevent colon cancer. Used to treat cancer. Without the use of chemotherapy.</p> <p>Gac grows on dioecious vines and is usually collected from fence climbers or from wild plants. The vines can be commonly seen growing on lattices at the entrances to rural homes or in gardens. It only fruits once a year and is found seasonally in local markets. The fruit itself becomes a dark orange color upon ripening, and is typically round or oblong, maturing to a size of about 13 cm in length and 10 cm in diameter. Its exterior skin is covered in small spines while its dark red interior consists of clusters of fleshy pulp and seeds.</p> <p>It can be propagated by seed or by plant roots. Wetland. Due to the relative vine needs water. Gac will start flowering around 2-3 months after planting to flowering will begin in May and lasts until the flowers in August. Ripe for harvest approximately 20 days during the month. July to February and in the first season can be harvested up to the 30-60 result.</p> <p><strong>Sowing techniques "GAC FRUIT" to grow faster than normal.</strong></p> <p>The shell of the seed is very Crackers need a break. To make it grow faster too.</p> <p>On Crackers with a short knife cleaver Hardshell that will break off easily. Similar to lamb, watermelon seed it again time to grow up to 2.5 weeks, it cleared the light breaks through the soil.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gac" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Wikipedia</a>:</strong></p> <p>Momordica cochinchinensis is a Southeast Asian fruit found throughout the region from Southern China to Northeastern Australia, mostly Vietnam.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>It is commonly known as gac, from the Vietnamese gấc (pronounced [ɣək˦˥]) or quả gấc (quả being a classifier for spherical objects such as fruit). It is known as mùbiēguǒ (木鳖果) in Chinese, and variously as Baby Jackfruit, Spiny Bitter Gourd, Sweet Gourd, or Cochinchin Gourd in English.</p> <p><strong>Characteristics</strong></p> <p>Because it has a relatively short harvest season (which peaks in December and January), making it less abundant than other foods, gac is typically served at ceremonial or festive occasions in Vietnam, such as Tết (the Vietnamese new year) and weddings. It is most commonly prepared as a dish called xôi gấc, in which the aril and seeds of the fruit are cooked in glutinous rice, imparting both their color and flavor. More recently, the fruit has begun to be marketed outside of Asia in the form of juice dietary supplements because of its allegedly high phytonutrient content.</p> <p><strong>Growth</strong></p> <p>Gac grows on dioecious vines and is usually collected from fence climbers or from wild plants. The vines can be commonly seen growing on lattices at the entrances to rural homes or in gardens. It only fruits once a year, and is found seasonally in local markets. The fruit itself becomes a dark orange color upon ripening, and is typically round or oblong, maturing to a size of about 13 cm in length and 10 cm in diameter. Its exterior skin is covered in small spines while its dark red interior consists of clusters of fleshy pulp and seeds.</p> <p><strong>Traditional uses</strong></p> <p>Traditionally, gac has been used as both food and medicine in the regions in which it grows. Other than the use of its fruit and leaves for special Vietnamese culinary dishes, gac is also used for its medicinal and nutritional properties. In Vietnam, the seed membranes are said to aid in the relief of dry eyes, as well as to promote healthy vision.[citation needed] Similarly, in traditional Chinese medicine the seeds of gac, known in Mandarin Chinese as mùbiēzǐ (Chinese: 木鳖子), are employed for a variety of internal and external purposes.</p> <p><strong>Nutrients and phytochemicals</strong></p> <p>Typical of orange-colored plant foods, gac fruit contains carotenoids such as beta-carotene (provitamin A).[1] Vietnamese children fed a rice dish containing beta-carotene from gac had higher blood levels of beta-carotene than those in the control group.[2] Gac aril oil contains high levels of vitamin E.[3] Fatty acids in the aril oil may facilitate absorption of fat-soluble nutrients, including carotenoids.[4]</p> <p>Due to its high content of beta-carotene and lycopene,[1][4] gac extracts may be sold as a food supplement in soft capsules or included in a juice blend. Gac contains substantial lycopene, beta-carotene[1] and a protein that may inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells.[5] Two cyclotides isolated, MCoT-I and MCoT-II, may have properties to inhibit trypsin.</p> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <h3><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">soak in water for 12 hours, or option 2 look piture 10 (last one)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.5-1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">20-25 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-4 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </body> </html>
P 139
Gac Exotic Fruit Seeds (Momordica cochinchinensis)

Obří rostlina (s obřími plody)
Giant Blackberry Seeds (Rubus fruticosus) 1.85 - 3

Giant Blackberry Seeds...

Cena 1,85 € (SKU: V 126)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Giant Blackberry Seeds (Rubus fruticosus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><strong>This variety produces extremely large fruits weighing 10 grams per fruit.</strong></p> <p>Triple Crown Blackberry Seeds . The healthful benefits are many , rich in vitamin C , vitamin K , B vitamin , Omega-3 , Manganese .  Antioxidant strength at top of more than 1000 antioxidant foods consumed in the U.S.</p> <p><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></p> <p>The blackberry is an edible fruit produced by many species in the Rubus genus in the Rosaceae family, hybrids among these species within the Rubus subgenus, and hybrids between the Rubus and Idaeobatus subgenera. What distinguishes the blackberry from its raspberry relatives is whether or not the torus (receptacle or stem) 'picks-with' (i.e. stays with) the fruit. When picking a blackberry fruit, the torus does stay with the fruit. With a raspberry, the torus remains on the plant, leaving a hollow core in the raspberry fruit. The term 'bramble', a word meaning any impenetrable scrub, has traditionally been applied specifically to the blackberry or its products,[1] though in the United States it applies to all members of the Rubus genus. In the western US, the term caneberry is used to refer to blackberries and raspberries as a group rather than the term bramble.</p> <p>The usually black fruit is not a berry in the botanical sense of the word. Botanically it is termed an aggregate fruit, composed of small drupelets. It is a widespread and well-known group of over 375 species, many of which are closely related apomictic microspecies native throughout Europe, northwestern Africa, temperate western and central Asia and North and South America.</p> <p><strong>Growth and anatomical description</strong></p> <p>Blackberries are perennial plants which typically bear biennial stems ("canes") from the perennial root system.</p> <p>In its first year, a new stem, the primocane, grows vigorously to its full length of 3–6 m (in some cases, up to 9 m), arching or trailing along the ground and bearing large palmately compound leaves with five or seven leaflets; it does not produce any flowers. In its second year, the cane becomes a floricane and the stem does not grow longer, but the lateral buds break to produce flowering laterals (which have smaller leaves with three or five leaflets).[3] First- and second-year shoots usually have numerous short-curved, very sharp prickles that are often erroneously called thorns. These prickles can tear through denim with ease and make the plant very difficult to navigate around. Prickle-free cultivars have been developed. Recently the University of Arkansas has developed primocane fruiting blackberries that grow and flower on first-year growth much as the primocane-fruiting (also called fall bearing or everbearing) red raspberries do.</p> <p>Unmanaged mature plants form a tangle of dense arching stems, the branches rooting from the node tip on many species when they reach the ground. Vigorous and growing rapidly in woods, scrub, hillsides, and hedgerows, blackberry shrubs tolerate poor soils, readily colonizing wasteland, ditches, and vacant lots.</p> <p>The flowers are produced in late spring and early summer on short racemes on the tips of the flowering laterals.[3] Each flower is about 2–3 cm in diameter with five white or pale pink petals.[3]</p> <p>The drupelets only develop around ovules that are fertilized by the male gamete from a pollen grain. The most likely cause of undeveloped ovules is inadequate pollinator visits.[5] Even a small change in conditions, such as a rainy day or a day too hot for bees to work after early morning, can reduce the number of bee visits to the flower, thus reducing the quality of the fruit. Incomplete drupelet development can also be a symptom of exhausted reserves in the plant's roots or infection with a virus such as Raspberry bushy dwarf virus.</p> <p>In botanical terminology, the fruit is not a berry but an aggregate fruit of numerous drupelets.</p> <p><strong>Ecology</strong></p> <p>Blackberry leaves are food for certain caterpillars; some grazing mammals, especially deer, are also very fond of the leaves. Caterpillars of the concealer moth Alabonia geoffrella have been found feeding inside dead blackberry shoots. When mature, the berries are eaten and their seeds dispersed by several mammals, such as the red fox and the Eurasian badger, as well as by small birds.</p> <p>Blackberries grow wild throughout all parts of the United Kingdom and Ireland. They are an important element in the ecology of those countries. Harvesting the berries is a popular pastime in these countries. However, it is also considered an invasive weed, sending down its strong suckering roots amongst garden hedges and shrubs. In some parts of the world, such as in Australia, Chile, New Zealand, and the Pacific Northwest of North America, some blackberry species, particularly Rubus armeniacus (syn. R. procerus, 'Himalaya') and Rubus laciniatus ('Evergreen'), are naturalised and considered an invasive species and a serious weed.</p> <p>The blackberry tends to be red during its unripe ("green") phase, leading to an old expression that "blackberries are red when they're green".</p> <p>In various parts of the United States, wild blackberries are sometimes called "Black-caps", a term more commonly used for black raspberries, Rubus occidentalis.</p> <p>As there is forensic evidence from the Iron Age Haraldskær Woman that she consumed blackberries some 2500 years ago, it is reasonable to conclude that blackberries have been eaten by humans over thousands of years.</p> <p><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Food</strong></p> <p>The soft fruit is popular for use in desserts, jams, seedless jelly, and sometimes wine. It is often mixed with apples for pies and crumbles. Blackberries are also used to produce candy.</p> <p>Good nectar producers, blackberry shrubs bearing flowers yield a medium to dark, fruity honey.</p> <p><strong>Phytochemical research</strong></p> <p>Blackberries contain numerous phytochemicals including polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, salicylic acid, ellagic acid, and fiber.[7][8] Anthocyanins in blackberries are responsible for their rich dark color.</p> <p>Phytochemical components of blackberries, salicylic acid and ellagic acid have been associated in preliminary research with toxicity to cancer cells,[9][10] including breast cancer cells.</p> <p>Blackberries rank highly among fruits for in vitro antioxidant strength, particularly because of their dense content of polyphenolic compounds, such as ellagic acid, tannins, ellagitannins, quercetin, gallic acid, anthocyanins, and cyanidins.[12][13] One report placed blackberry at the top of more than 1000 antioxidant foods consumed in the United States.</p> <p><strong>Nutrients</strong></p> <p>Blackberries are notable for their high nutritional contents of dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin K, and the essential mineral manganese.</p> <p>Blackberries have both soluble and insoluble fiber.[15] One cup of blackberries (144 g) has an average of 7.6 g of fibre and contains half the daily recommended dose of vitamin C.[8] Dietary fiber is important in maintaining a healthy digestive system, as it supports regular bowel movements.</p> <p><strong>Nutrient content of seeds</strong></p> <p>Blackberries contain numerous large seeds that are not always preferred by consumers. The seeds contain oil rich in omega-3 (alpha-linolenic acid) and -6 fats (linoleic acid) as well as protein, dietary fiber, carotenoids, ellagitannins and ellagic acid.</p> <p><strong><em>Cultivation</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Commercial cultivation</strong></p> <p>Worldwide, Mexico is the leading producer of blackberries, with nearly the entire crop being produced for export into the off-season fresh markets in North America and Europe. The Mexican market is almost entirely from the cultivar 'Tupy' (often spelled 'Tupi', but the EMBRAPA program in Brazil from which it was released prefers the 'Tupy' spelling.). In the US, Oregon is the leading commercial blackberry producer, producing 42.6 million pounds on 6,180 acres (25.0 km2), in 1995[17] and 56.1 million pounds on 7,000 acres (28 km2) in 2009.</p> <p>Numerous cultivars have been selected for commercial and amateur cultivation in Europe[2] and the United States.[19] Since the many species form hybrids easily, there are numerous cultivars with more than one species in their ancestry.</p> <p>'Marion' (marketed as "marionberry") is an important cultivar that was selected from seedlings from a cross between 'Chehalem' and 'Olallie' (commonly called "olallieberry") berries.[20] 'Olallie' in turn is a cross between loganberry and youngberry. 'Marion', 'Chehalem' and 'Olallie' are just three of many trailing blackberry cultivars developed by the United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) blackberry breeding program at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon.</p> <p>The most recent cultivars released from this program are the prickle-free cultivars 'Black Diamond', 'Black Pearl', and 'Nightfall' as well as the very early-ripening 'Obsidian' and 'Metolius'. 'Black Diamond' is now the leading cultivar being planted in the Pacific Northwest. Some of the other cultivars from this program are 'Newberry', 'Waldo', 'Siskiyou', 'Black Butte', 'Kotata', 'Pacific', and 'Cascade'.</p> <p>Trailing blackberries are vigorous and crown forming, require a trellis for support, and are less cold hardy than the erect or semi-erect blackberries. In addition to the United States's Pacific Northwest, these types do well in similar climates such as the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Chile, and the Mediterranean countries.</p> <p>Semi-erect, prickle-free blackberries were first developed at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK, and subsequently by the USDA-ARS in Beltsville, Maryland. These are crown forming and very vigorous and need a trellis for support. Cultivars include 'Black Satin' 'Chester Thornless', 'Dirksen Thornless', 'Hull Thornless', 'Loch Ness', 'Loch Tay', 'Merton Thornless', 'Smoothstem', and 'Triple Crown'. Recently, the cultivar 'Cacanska Bestrna' (also called 'Cacak Thornless') has been developed in Serbia and has been planted on many thousands of hectares there.</p> <p>The University of Arkansas has developed cultivars of erect blackberries. These types are less vigorous than the semi-erect types and produce new canes from root initials (therefore they spread underground like raspberries). There are prickly and prickle-free cultivars from this program, including 'Navaho', 'Ouachita', 'Cherokee', 'Apache', 'Arapaho', and 'Kiowa'. They are also responsible for developing the primocane fruiting blackberries such as 'Prime-Jan' and 'Prime-Jim'.</p> <p>In raspberries, these types are called primocane fruiting, fall fruiting, or everbearing. 'Prime-Jim' and 'Prime-Jan' were released in 2004 by the University of Arkansas and are the first cultivars of primocane fruiting blackberry.[22] They grow much like the other erect cultivars described above, however the canes that emerge in the spring, will flower in mid-summer and fruit in late summer or fall. The fall crop has its highest quality when it ripens in cool mild climate such as in California or the Pacific Northwest.</p> <p>'Illini Hardy' a semi-erect prickly cultivar introduced by the University of Illinois is cane hardy in zone 5, where traditionally blackberry production has been problematic, since canes often failed to survive the winter.</p> <p>Blackberry production in Mexico has expanded enormously in the past decade. While once based on the cultivar 'Brazos', an old erect blackberry cultivar developed in Texas in 1959, the Mexican industry is now dominated by the Brazilian 'Tupy' released in the 1990s. 'Tupy' has the erect blackberry 'Comanche', and a "wild Uruguayan blackberry" as parents.[23] Since there are no native blackberries in Uruguay, the suspicion is that the widely grown 'Boysenberry' is the male parent. In order to produce these blackberries in regions of Mexico where there is no winter chilling to stimulate flower bud development, chemical defoliation and application of growth regulators are used to bring the plants into bloom.</p> <p><strong>Diseases and pests</strong></p> <p>As a result of blackberries belonging to the same genus as raspberries,[24] they share the same diseases including anthracnose which can cause the berry to have uneven ripening and sap flow may also be slowed.[25][26] They also share the same remedies including the Bordeaux mixture,[27] a combination of lime, water and Copper(II) sulfate.[28] The rows between blackberry plants must be free of weeds, blackberry suckers and grasses which may lead to pests or diseases.[29] Fruit growers are selective when planting blackberry bushes as wild blackberries may be infected[29] and gardeners are recommended to purchase only certified disease-free plants.</p> <p>The spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii is a serious pest of blackberries.[31] Unlike its vinegar fly relatives which are primarily attracted to rotting or fermented fruit, D. suzukii attacks fresh, ripe fruit by laying eggs under the soft skin. The larvae hatch and grow in the fruit, destroying the fruit's commercial value.</p> <p>Another pest is Amphorophora rubi, known as the Blackberry Aphid, which not only eats blackberries but raspberries as well.</p> <p> Byturus tomentosus (Raspberry beetle), Lampronia corticella (Raspberry Moth) and Anthonomus rubi (Strawberry blossom weevil) are also known to infest blackberries.</p> <p><strong>Folklore</strong></p> <p>Folklore in the United Kingdom is told that blackberries should not be picked after Old Michaelmas Day (11 October) as the devil has claimed them. There is some value behind this legend as wetter and cooler weather often allows the fruit to become infected by various molds such as Botryotinia which give the fruit an unpleasant look and may be toxic.</p> </div> </body> </html>
V 126
Giant Blackberry Seeds (Rubus fruticosus) 1.85 - 3
GUARANA Seeds (Paullinia Cupana)  - 4

GUARANA Seeds (Paullinia...

Cena 5,00 € (SKU: MHS 33)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>GUARANA Seeds Shrub Vine (Paullinia Cupana)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Guarana is from the Amazon Rain Forest. It is considered a vine or climbing shrub. It likes high temperatures, moisture, &amp; humidity - the conditions it would naturally be found in. Guarana is used as a dietary supplement &amp; energy booster. It has twice as much caffeine as coffee beans!</p> <p>NAME: Guarana</p> <p>SCIENTIFIC NAME: Paullinia Cupana</p> <p>COLOR: Ivory flowers</p> <p>PLANT SEEDS: Outdoors after frost / Indoors weeks before last frost</p> <p>BLOOM TIME: Summer</p> <p>HARDINESS ZONE: Tender Perennial</p> <p>PLANT HEIGHT: 15 - 40 Feet</p> <p>PLANT SPACING: 20 Feet or in pots</p> <p>LIGHT REQUIREMENTS: Sun - Part Shade</p> <p>SOIL &amp; WATER PREFERENCES: Average</p> <h2><strong><em>WIKIPEDIA:</em></strong></h2> <p>Guarana (/ˌɡwɑrəˈnɑː/, from the Portuguese guaraná [ɡwaɾɐˈna]), Paullinia cupana, syn. P. crysan, P. sorbilis) is a climbing plant in the maple family, Sapindaceae, native to the Amazon basin and especially common in Brazil. Guarana features large leaves and clusters of flowers, and is best known for its fruit, which is about the size of a coffee bean. As a dietary supplement, guarana is an effective stimulant: its seeds contain about twice the concentration of caffeine found in coffee beans (about 2–4.5% caffeine in guarana seeds compared to 1–2% for coffee beans).</p> <p>As with other plants producing caffeine, the high concentration of caffeine is a defensive toxin that repels herbivores from the berry and its seeds.</p> <p>The guarana fruit's colour ranges from brown to red and contains black seeds which are partly covered by white arils. The colour contrast when the fruit has been split open has been likened to eyeballs; this has formed the basis of a myth.</p> <p><strong>History and culture</strong></p> <p>The word guarana comes from the Guaraní word guara-ná, which has its origins in the Sateré-Maué word for the plant, warana, that in Tupi-Guarani means "fruit like the eyes of the people"</p> <p>Guarana plays an important role in Tupi and Guaraní Paraguayan culture. According to a myth attributed to the Sateré-Maué tribe, guarana's domestication originated with a deity killing a beloved village child. To console the villagers, a more benevolent god plucked the left eye from the child and planted it in the forest, resulting in the wild variety of guarana. The god then plucked the right eye from the child and planted it in the village, giving rise to domesticated guarana.</p> <p>The Guaranís would make an herbal tea by shelling, washing and drying the seeds, followed by pounding them into a fine powder. The powder is kneaded into a dough and then shaped into cylinders. This product is known as guarana bread, which would be grated and then immersed into hot water along with sugar.</p> <p>This plant was introduced to European colonizers and to Europe in the 16th century by Oviedo, Hernández, Cobo and other Spaniard chroniclers. By 1958, guarana was commercialized.</p> <p><strong>Composition</strong></p> <p>The table contains a partial listing of some of the chemicals found in guarana seeds, although other parts of the plant may contain them as well in varying quantities.</p> <p>According to the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, guaranine is defined as only the caffeine chemical in guarana, it is identical to the caffeine chemical derived from other sources, for example coffee, tea, and maté. Guaranine, theine, and mateine are all synonyms for caffeine when the definitions of those words include none of the properties and chemicals of their host plants except the chemical caffeine. Natural sources of caffeine contain widely varying mixtures of xanthine alkaloids other than caffeine, including the cardiac stimulants theophylline and theobromine and other substances such as polyphenols, which can form insoluble complexes with caffeine. The main natural phenols found in guarana are (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>Guarana is used in sweetened or carbonated soft drinks and energy shots, an ingredient of herbal teas or contained in capsules. Generally, South America obtains most of its caffeine from guarana.</p> <p><strong>Beverages</strong></p> <p>Brazil, which is the third-largest consumer of soft drinks in the world, produces several soft drink brands from guarana extract. The Portuguese word guaraná is widely used in Brazil as a reference to soft drinks containing guarana extract.</p> <p><strong>Cognitive effects</strong></p> <p>As guarana is rich in caffeine, it is of interest for its potential effects on cognition. In rats, guarana increased memory retention and physical endurance when compared with a placebo.</p> <p>A randomized controlled trial has shown that cognition may be improved with guarana.</p> <p><strong>Other uses and side effects</strong></p> <p>In the United States, guarana has received the designation of "generally recognized as safe" by the American Food and Drug Administration.</p> <p>Preliminary research has shown guarana may affect how quickly the body perceives itself to be full. One study showed an average 5.1 kg (11.2 lb) weight loss in a group taking a mixture of yerba mate, guarana, and damiana, compared to an average one-pound loss in a placebo group after 45 days.</p> <p>Although inconclusive about specific effects due only to guarana, this study differs from another showing no effect on body weight of a formula containing guarana.</p> <p>Guarana extract reduced aggregation of rabbit platelets by up to 37 percent below control values and decreased platelet thromboxane formation from arachidonic acid by 78 percent below control values.  It is not known if such platelet action has any effect on the risk of heart attack or ischemic stroke.</p> </body> </html>
MHS 33
GUARANA Seeds (Paullinia Cupana)  - 4
Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds 1.85 - 1

Semena Passiflora colinvauxii

Cena 3,00 € (SKU: V 18 PCX)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Semena Passiflora colinvauxii</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Cena za balení 3 semen.</strong></span></h2> <p>Passiflora colinvauxii nebo mučenka Colinvaux. Tento vzácný horolezec Passiflora je ve svém přirozeném prostředí ohrožen a je jedním ze 45 Passiflora uvedených v Červeném seznamu ohrožených rostlin IUCN z roku 1997. Je uveden jako vzácný. Tato rostlina je mimořádně plodná, která ráda žije v částečném stínu.</p> <p>Voní jako zimolez a přitahuje včely a motýly. Je to rychle rostoucí horolezec s dvojlaločnými listy 7-16 cm. V létě hojně kvete, což přitahuje včely.</p> <p>Květy jsou středně velké. Sepaly a lístky jsou bílé. Koróna se skládá z řady vláken, fialové s bílými konci.</p> <p>Plody jsou oválné, 2-4 cm dlouhé a 1-1,5 cm široké.</p> <p>Nachází se na slavných Galapágách, kde byl objeven v roce 1966, ale pravděpodobně tam cestoval z Ekvádoru.</p> <p>Zóny odolnosti USDA 10 až 11</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>about 24-48 hours soak in warm water</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>25 ° C +</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 18 PCX (3 S)
Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds 1.85 - 1

Caigua, Inca Cucumber Seeds...

Caigua, Inca Cucumber Seeds...

Cena 3,50 € (SKU: PK 11)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Caigua, Inca Cucumber Seeds (Cyclanthera pedata)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>As every year so far, we have sown this beautiful and healthy plant again and the yield was excellent. Many wonder if this plant can thrive in their climate? Yes, if you can grow an ordinary cucumber, then this plant will also grow well in your climate. We have to add that it grows and expands very quickly, and it is great for a pergola, within a month it will expand over 3 meters in length and create great shade.</p> <p>Common name: Caigua, Slipper gourd, Lady's slipper, Sparrow gourd, Stuffing Cucumber…</p> <p>Well-known in the tropics and hotter countries, this herbaceous vine is grown for its edible fruit, which is predominantly used as a vegetable. It is known from cultivation only, and its large size, compared to closely related wild species, suggests that it is a fully domesticated crop going back for many centuries, evidence coming from ancient Peruvian ceramics depicting the fruits. The fully grown but still immature fruits are usually eaten cooked, as well as use in salads and pickles.</p> <h3><strong>Sowing advice </strong><strong>Caigua, Slipper gourd, Lady's slipper, Sparrow gourd: </strong></h3> <p>For best results, sow seeds in good light at any time onto a good soil-based compost. Cover the seeds with fine grit or compost to approximately their own depth. We recommend germinating at 15 to 20 degrees C. Seeds should ideally germinate in between 2 and 6 weeks although they make take considerably longer. Pot on seedlings before finally planting out into a container or a well-drained spot.</p> <h3><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></h3> <p>Cyclanthera pedata, locally known by its Quechua names kaywa (pronounced kai-wa, hispanicized spellings caigua, caihua, caygua, cayua) or achuqcha (also spelled achocha, achogcha, achojcha, achokcha), is a herbaceous vine grown for its edible mature fruit, which is predominantly used as a vegetable. Kaywa is known from cultivation only, and its large fruit size as compared to closely related wild species suggests that it is a fully domesticated crop. Its use goes back many centuries as evidenced by ancient phytomorphic ceramics from Peru depicting the fruits. It is also known as slipper gourd, lady's slipper, sparrow gourd (Chinese: 小雀瓜; pinyin: xiǎoquè guā), pepino in Colombia, stuffing cucumber in English, korila in the Philippines, and olochoto and kichipoktho in Bhutan. It is also called chuche karela in Nepal and Southern Bhutan.</p> <h3><strong>Origin and distribution</strong></h3> <p>Domesticated in the Andes and traditionally distributed from Colombia to Bolivia, the kaywa is now grown in many parts of Central America and also in parts of the Eastern Hemisphere tropics. For example, kaywa is very popular in northeastern India, Nepal and Bhutan. The Moche culture had a fascination with agriculture and displayed this in their art. The kaywa was often depicted in their ceramics.</p> <h3><strong>Food uses</strong></h3> <p>Typically, the fully grown, mature fruits are eaten cooked, raw in salads, and pickled. The kaywa has a subtle flavour similar to cucumber. The fruit has a large cavity in which the seeds develop, and this can be filled with other foods to make kaywa dishes. This may have inspired the local Spanish name pepino de rellenar ("stuffing cucumber"). The young shoots and leaves may also be eaten as greens.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
PK 11 (5 S)
Caigua, Inca Cucumber Seeds (Cyclanthera pedata)
Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest" (Fragaria x ananassa)

Climbing Strawberry seeds...

Cena 2,50 € (SKU: V 1 CS)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="text-decoration: underline;" class=""><em><strong>Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest"</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of<strong>&nbsp;10&nbsp;</strong>seeds.</strong></span><em><br></em></strong></h3> <p>A unique climbing strawberry! This fast, strong growing variety will produce runners up to 1,5m in length that make a real talking point when trained up a trellis or obelisk climbing frame, or cascading from window boxes and hanging baskets. Better still, Strawberry 'Mount Everest' is an ever-bearering variety that produces a delicious crop of medium sized, sweet, juicy fruits from June right through to September! Height: 1,5m. Spread: 30cm.</p> <p>Estimated time to cropping once planted: 4-8 months.<br>Estimated time to best yields: 4-8 months.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 1 CS
Climbing Strawberry seeds "Mount Everest" (Fragaria x ananassa)

Long pepper Seeds - Indian long pepper 2.55 - 1

Long pepper Seeds (Piper...

Cena 2,55 € (SKU: MHS 56 PL)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Long pepper Seeds - Indian long pepper (Piper longum)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Long pepper (Piper longum), sometimes called Indian long pepper, is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. Long pepper has a similar, but hotter, taste to its close relative Piper nigrum - from which black, green and white pepper are obtained. The word pepper itself is derived from the Tamil/Malayalam word for long pepper, pippali.</p> <p>The fruit of the pepper consists of many minuscule fruits — each about the size of a poppy seed — embedded in the surface of a flower spike that closely resembles a hazel tree catkin. Like Piper nigrum, the fruits contain the alkaloid piperine, which contributes to their pungency. Another species of long pepper, Piper retrofractum, is native to Java, Indonesia. The fruits of this plant are often confused with chili peppers, which belong to the genus Capsicum , originally from the Americas.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>Long pepper first reference comes from ancient Indian textbooks of Ayurveda, where its medicinal and dietary uses are described in detail. It reached Greece in the sixth or fifth century BCE, though Hippocrates discussed it as a medicament rather than a spice.[4] Among the Greeks and Romans and prior to the European rediscovery of the American Continents, long pepper was an important and well-known spice. The ancient history of black pepper is often interlinked with (and confused with) that of long pepper, though Theophrastus distinguished the two in the first work of botany. The Romans knew of both and often referred to either as just piper; Pliny erroneously believed dried black pepper and long pepper came from the same plant. Round, or black pepper, began to compete with long pepper in Europe from the twelfth century and had displaced it by the fourteenth. The quest for cheaper and more dependable sources of black pepper fueled the Age of Discoveries; only after the discovery of the American Continents and of chili pepper, called by the Spanish pimiento, employing their word for long pepper, did the popularity of long pepper fade away.[5] Chili peppers, some of which, when dried, are similar in shape and taste to long pepper, were easier to grow in a variety of locations more convenient to Europe. Today, long pepper is a rarity in general commerce.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>Today, long pepper is a very rare ingredient in European cuisines, but it can still be found in Indian, and Nepalese vegetable pickles, some North African spice mixtures, and in Indonesian and Malaysian cooking. It is readily available at Indian grocery stores, where it is usually labeled pippali.</p> <p>Long pepper is known to contain the chemical compound piperlongumine.</p> </div> </body> </html>
MHS 56 PL (5 S)
Long pepper Seeds - Indian long pepper 2.55 - 1

Léčivá nebo kořenící rostlina
Jiaogulan Seeds Herb - Plant of immortality

Jiaogulan Seeds (Gynostemma...

Cena 1,85 € (SKU: MHS 40)
,
5/ 5
<h2>Jiaogulan Seeds Herb - Plant of immortality (Gynostemma pentaphyllum)</h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Gynostemma pentaphyllum, also called Jiaogulan is indigenous to the southern reaches of China, northern Vietnam, southern Korea, and Japan.</p> <p>Jiaogulan is best known as an herbal medicine reputed to have powerful antioxidant and adaptogenic effects purported to increase longevity.</p> <p>Pharmacological research has indicated a number of therapeutic qualities of Jiaogulan, such as lowering cholesterol and high blood pressure, strengthening immunity, and inhibiting cancer growth.</p> <p>Additionally, Jiaogulan contains THREE TIMES MORE effective compounds similar to those found in Panax ginseng which is known as one of the healthiest and most expensive plants on earth. So don't waste your money for expensive, and often even chemically treated herbs. Better buy some seeds and grow your own medicinal herbs, 100% organically!</p> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>preswollen 1 day in water</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0,5-1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>20 - 25° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>1-4 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.</em></span></p> <p><span><em>&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 40 (5 S)
Jiaogulan Seeds Herb - Plant of immortality
Bittersweet Seeds (Solanum dulcamara) 1.75 - 5

Bittersweet Seeds (Solanum...

Cena 1,75 € (SKU: MHS 51)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Bittersweet Seeds (Solanum dulcamara)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Solanaceae: semi-woody herbaceous perennial vine, which scrambles over other plants, capable of reaching a height of 4 m where suitable support is available, but more often 1–2 meters high. The leaves are 4–12 cm long, roughly arrowhead-shaped, and often lobed at the base. The pretty flowers are in loose clusters of 3–20, 1–1.5 cm across, star-shaped, with five purple petals and yellow stamens and style pointing forward. The fruit is an ovoid bright red berry about 1 cm long, soft and juicy, with the aspect and odour of a tiny tomato, some reports suggest that the red berries are edible when ripe, but poisonous when green and unripe, and other literature suggests that they are deadly poisonous either red or green, I have never be tempted to find out for myself. Native to Britain, northern Africa, Europe and Asia.</p> <p> </p> <p>Bittersweet is a poisonous plant that has a long history of use in the treatment of skin diseases, warts, tumours, felons etc., all parts of the plant are alterative, anodyne, depurative, mildly diuretic, emetic, expectorant, hepatic, mildly narcotic and purgative. it should be used with caution and only under the supervision of a qualified practitioner, this is a poisonous plant that, in excess, paralyzes the central nervous system, slows the heart and respiration, and lowers temperature, causing vertigo, delirium, convulsions and death.</p> <p> </p> <p>Sow seeds in spring, a soak in Ga3 will help, when they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer. If you have sufficient seed then it can be sown outdoors in situ in the spring.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>WARNING:</strong> There is a lot of disagreement over whether or not the leaves or fruit of this plant are poisonous. Views vary from relatively poisonous to perfectly safe to eat. The plant is cultivated as a food crop, both for its fruit and its leaves, in some parts of the world and it is probably true to say that toxicity can vary considerably according to where the plant is grown and the cultivar that is being grown. The unripe fruit contains the highest concentration of toxins.</p> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <h3><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Just lightly cover with substrate</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">min. 20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">until it germinates </span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><strong><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></strong></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table>
MHS 51 (5 S)
Bittersweet Seeds (Solanum dulcamara) 1.75 - 5

Obří rostlina (s obřími plody)
Yellow Passion Fruit Seeds (Passiflora Flavicarpa) 1.95 - 1

Giant Yellow Passion Fruit...

Cena 1,95 € (SKU: V 18 PF)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Giant&nbsp;Yellow Passion Fruit Seeds (Passiflora Flavicarpa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span>Passiflora flavicarpa, the Yellow Passion Fruit, or Golden Passion Fruit, is native from southern Brazil through Paraguay to northern Argentina and now cultivated in all tropical areas. This is a vigorous perennial vine, with stems reaching lengths of 20 to 50, or even 80 meters high. It climbs by means of clinging tendrils. It grows on fences or trellises, or allow it to scramble over shrubs and trees. It can be kept as a container plant. It may be grown as a houseplant in a sunny South-facing window.</p> <p>It's a fast grower with beautiful flowers and edible fruits. The flowers are fragrant, 6 to 9 cm wide. The corona is composed of white filaments, or white and purple. The first leaves are unilobate, becoming trilobate very soon. The leaves are glossy dark green and vary from 5 to 18 cm in length for the central lobe and from 4 to 17 cm for the lateral lobes.</p> <p>The fruit is produced on a woody vine from bisexual flowers. The fruit is somewhat tart and contains many black seeds. It is less fragrant and slightly more acid than the Passiflora Edulis. Passion Fruit is commonly used in beverages. The yellow fruit is a round to oval, 6-12 cm by 4-7 cm. The pulp constitutes up to 55% of the fruit in the best selections.</p> <p>Pruning is a must to keep the vine healthy. Prune off less vigorous growth and occasionally prune back vigorous growth to promote flowering. When established, and without care, the passion fruit can easily overtake other garden plants, shading them from the sun.</p> <p>Hardiness zone 11, (4°C/40°F) in Winter. It has only mild hardiness, surviving temperatures to 40°F, so protect from any frosts. Passiflora Flavicarpa is best in the Subtropics and prefers full sun, it will scramble over trees and shrubs to get it. It is also more demanding in terms of heat and humidity than Passiflora Edulis, and will grow better at low elevations. Provide ideally a temperature of 25°- 30°C. It will do best in a loam-based mix with a little peat moss. Passiflora Flavicarpa likes light and evenly moist soil, mulch well.</p> <p>You may need to water your plants on a daily basis during the hottest summer months. During the Winter the roots should be kept moist, but as growth will be much slower you will probably only need to water once a week, depending on growing temperature. Fertilize at least once every two weeks in the growing season.</p> <p>If their pot is too large or if they have an unrestricted root run then the whole plant will simply get bigger and bigger but it will refuse to flower and therefore produce the fruits. By limiting the pot size you are limiting the ability to grow and this is seen as a threat, so the natural mechanism is to produce seed for the next generation. A suitably sized pot for an adult plant would generally be of 12 inches in diameter.</p> <h2><strong style="color: #008000;">Propagation - Sowing Passiflora Seeds</strong></h2> <div><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/propagation-sowing-passiflora-seeds.html" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/propagation-sowing-passiflora-seeds.html</a></span></strong></span>&nbsp;</div>
V 18 PF (5 S)
Yellow Passion Fruit Seeds (Passiflora Flavicarpa) 1.95 - 1
Bottle gourd Snake Seeds (Lagenaria siceraria) 2 - 1

Bottle gourd Snake Seeds...

Cena 2,00 € (SKU: VG 23)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Bottle gourd Snake Seeds (Lagenaria siceraria)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A rare, unusual climbing plant for trellises, railings and house walls. A specialty from southern Italy. Develops huge, up to 2 m long, bottle-shaped fruits that have tasty meat. Preparation like cucumbers or zucchini. Harvest of young fruits at 20 cm in length. Allow mature fruits to dry in a dry, warm place as an ornamental squash. Requires sheltered, sunny locations and abundant.</p>
VG 23 (3 S)
Bottle gourd Snake Seeds (Lagenaria siceraria) 2 - 1

Rostlina odolná vůči mrazu a mrazu
Scarlet Firethorn Seeds...

Scarlet Firethorn Seeds...

Cena 1,50 € (SKU: T 19)
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Scarlet Firethorn Seeds (Pyracantha coccinea) Hardy</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 20 seeds.</span></strong></span></h2> <div><span>Scarlet Firethorn is a large, fast growing, semi-evergreen to evergreen shrub that is cherished for its spectacular fall and winter display of scarlet fruits and ability to withstand difficult conditions. Shooting long limber stems in all directions, an untrained Firethorn, typically grows into a tangled mound up to 18 feet in height and 12 feet wide. It is armed with sharp thorns that hide among the dark, glossy green leaves. Abundant clusters (corymbs) of small white flowers appear in spring. The flower clusters are up to 2 inches across and are borne close together creating the appearance of nearly solid surface of flowers. In fall the 1/4 inch berries begin to ripen, their color mellowing from green to shades of red and orange. These persist through winter and into early spring depending on climate and appetite of the local bird population. The prolific flowers are lovely to behold and have some fragrance (although not all would agree that it is appealing). Birds, especially cedar waxwings, like the plump, colorful berries. The brilliant berry-laden branches of Firethorn hold up extremely well in cut arrangements and add interest and color to wreaths.</span></div> <div>Firethorn is often used as an espalier. Held flat against a wall, it can be shaped quite creatively. Landscapers love the firethorns for their fast rate of growth and ability to withstand drought and neglect. The shrubs ruggedness and disease and pest resistance makes this plant a very popular item in commercial landscapes. The wide-reaching stems may be pruned back as needed during warm weather as the shrub blooms on old wood. Consider using it as a formal or informal hedge. This will require some trimming and shaping for the first few years but the effort will produce impressively beautiful and secure (thorny) hedges.</div> <div>Leaf: Alternate, simple, oblong to lanceolate, serrated margin, 1 to 2 inches long, semi-evergreen to evergreen, shiny, dark green above, paler and pubescent below. </div> <div>Flower: Creamy white, 5 petals, 1/3 inch across in tight clusters several inches across, appearing in late spring to early summer.</div> <div>Fruit: Small pome, 1/4 inch across, bright orange-red, occurring in tight clusters, very showy, ripens in late summer and persists through the winter. </div> <div>Twig: Slender, initially pubescent, later glaborous, red-brown, numerous spines, small buds. </div> <div>Bark: Smooth reddish brown with numerous lenticels. </div> <div>Form: Upright, open shrub with stiff limbs and thorns, can reach 18 feet tall. </div> <div>Other Names: Scarlet Firethorn</div> <div>Zone: 5 to 9 In moderate to severe zone 5 winters, the bronzed broadleaf evergreen foliage will severely "burn" or die, and stem dieback may occur anywhere from tip dieback all the way to the snowline.</div> <div>Growth Rate: Fast to Moderate</div> <div>Plant Type: Semi-evergreen to evergreen shrub</div> <div>Family: Rosaceae</div> <div>Native Range: Europe, Southwestern Asia</div> <div>Height: 10 to 18 feet</div> <div>Spread: 10 to 18 feet</div> <div>Shape: Variable from upright and spreading to arching and irregular. Can become open without pruning.</div> <div>Bloom Time: May</div> <div>Bloom Color: White</div> <div>Sun: Sun to Part Shade</div> <div>Fall Color: Bronze to Evergreen</div> <div>Drought Tolerance: Moderate to High (once established)</div> <div>Water: Medium</div> <div>Maintenance: Low to Moderate</div> <div>Site Requirements/Soil Tolerances: Prefers moist, well-drained soils in full sun, but is very urban tolerant and adaptable to poor soils, compacted soils, soils of various pH, heat, drought, and heavy pruning. Will grow in partial to fairly heavy shade, however, flowering and fruiting will not be as heavy.</div> <div>Culture: Difficult to prune because of thorns. Best time to prune vigorously growing specimens or espaliers is either right after bloom (to set up flower buds and fruits for the following year) or in autumn or early spring (to gain firm control with heavy pruning, and forego flowering and fruiting for an entire year).</div> <div>Uses: Hedge/Screen, Espalier, Trellis, Bonsai, Crafts.</div> <div> <div> <p>Hardy, Adaptable, Easy to Grow, Fast Growth, Attracts Birds, Wildlife Food/Shelter, Showy Flowers/Fruit, Hedge/Screen, Espalier, Trellis, Bonsai, Cold, Heat, Drought, Urban and Wind Tolerant</p> </div> </div> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span>Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span>soak in water for 24  hours</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span>3-4 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span>all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span>3,2 mm - 1/8” (Cover lightly with substrate)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span>min. 18° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span>until it germinates </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td> <p><span>Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td> <p><br /><span><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table>
T 19 Y
Scarlet Firethorn Seeds (Pyracantha coccinea)