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Asian Pear Seeds - Chinese Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) 3 - 1

Asian Pear Seeds - Chinese...

Price €3.00 (SKU: V 30)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>Asian Pear Seeds - Chinese Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia)</h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 5 seeds.</span></h2> <div>Hardy, Showy Spring Flowers, Edible Fruits, Fall Color, Fast Growth, Shade Tree, Specimen Tree, Adaptable, Cold Tolerant, Espalier</div> <div>The Chinese Sand Pear is larger than most kinds of pear trees, reaching as high as 40 feet, with a rounded crown that may spread 20 feet or more across. In bloom, the tree is almost completely covered with white flowers, putting on a spectacular show in early spring. Individually, the flowers are 1 to 1.5 inches across, with five petals and similar to apple except for having longer pedicels.</div> <div>Asian Pears appear more like apple than European pear and have hard, crisp flesh like fruit when ripe, unlike the melting flesh European pears. Also, Asian pears will ripen on trees like apples, but European pears are subject to core breakdown if allowed to ripen fully on-tree. Chinese Sand Pears should be picked when they reach full size and begin to turn yellow. This also prevents maturation of the stone cells which give Sand Pears their gritty texture. Many growers wrap their pears individually in paper and store at room temperature.</div> <div>Although children may disagree, Chinese Sand Pear are generally considered inedible unless cooked. The fruits are hard and the flesh is grainy, some say "sandy" in texture. They are most useful for making pies, pear butter, preserves, and for canning.</div> <div>Asian Pears were domesticated in China about the same time European Pears were in Europe, 3000 years ago. Pyrus pyrifolia is native to central and southern China and probably the first to be domesticated. Chinese writings dating from 200-1000 BC describe pear propagation and culture. Asian Pears moved from China to Japan, Korea and Taiwan, where they are cultivated commercially today.</div> <div>Other Names: Crunch Pear, Apple Pear, Korean Pear, Japanese Pear, Taiwan Pear, Salad Pear, Nashi</div> <div>Zone: 5 to 9</div> <div>Growth Rate: Fast</div> <div>Plant Type: Deciduous Fruiting Tree</div> <div>Family: Rosaceae</div> <div>Native Range: China and Japan</div> <div>Height: 30 to 40 feet</div> <div>Spread: 20 to 30 feet</div> <div>Shape: Dense broadly pyramidal to rounded.</div> <div>Bloom Time: March-April</div> <div>Bloom Color: White</div> <div>Flower/Fruit: White flowers, 1 to 1.5 inches across with five petals followed by an edible round pome.</div> <div>Sun: Full sun</div> <div>Fall Color: Yellow, Orange, Red</div> <div>Drought Tolerance: Moderate</div> <div>Water: Moderate</div> <div>Maintenance: Medium-High</div> <div>Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Pears tolerate heavy, poorly drained soils better than most tree fruits. However, productivity is best on deep, well-drained loams with pH 6-7. Pears have very similar climatic requirements to apples, but are much more prone to fire blight and therefore cannot tolerate humid, wet springs. Pears require 900-1000 chill hours to break dormancy, although many Asian pears have lower chill requirements and can be grown as far south as northern Florida. Pears have similar or slightly lower cold hardiness than apples, tolerating  -10 to -20 F. Pears bloom 1-3 weeks before apple, and are therefore  prone to frost damage in most regions. Pears mature in as little as 90 days or as long as 200 days.</div> <div>Culture: Pears should not be over fertilized as this can lead to fire blight, a severe bacterial disease. Pyrus pyrifolia requires cross-pollination in order to bear fruit</div> <div>Uses: Group or specimen. Small shade tree. May be used as a street tree. A very good choice for colder climates and very ornamental. May be espaliered or Bonsai.</div> <div>  <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Sowing Instructions</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Propagation:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Seeds / Cuttings</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Pretreat:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>soak in water for 24  hours</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Stratification:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>3 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Sowing Time:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>all year round</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Sowing Depth:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>1 cm</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Sowing Mix:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Germination temperature:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>20+ ° C</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Location:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Germination Time:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>until it germinates </em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Watering:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Water regularly during the growing season</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em> </em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
V 30
Asian Pear Seeds - Chinese Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) 3 - 1

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Purple Apple Berry Seeds (Billardiera longiflora) 2.5 - 5

Purple Apple Berry Seeds...

Price €2.50 (SKU: V 31)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Purple Apple Berry Seeds (Billardiera longiflora)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Purple Apple Berry, also known as the Mountain Blue Berry, is a small vine native to the cool, moist forests of Australia. The wonderfully shiny, edible purple fruit start off white; becoming fully ripe in early winter after the greenish-yellow tubular trumpet-flowers are pollinated. The fruits are best harvested in late summer, before becoming over ripened.</p> <p class="">Tasting similar to apples, hence the name, these unusual plants are wonderful eaten raw or even fried and spiced. Ideally grown along trellis, or allowed to climb other plants, the purple apple berry is a hardy (withstanding temperatures as low as -5°C / 23°F), sun loving plant that appreciates being sheltered from high winds. Accustomed to moist, well drained soil, the Billardiera Longiflora is a Royal Horticultural Society Garden Merit Award Winner.<span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000; font-size: 12pt;"></span></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Sowing Instructions:</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Sow in trays or pots on the surface of a mix of two-thirds peat based compost, eg. Levington and one third sand, and just cover the seed with a sprinkling of sieved compost or vermiculite.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Place in a propagator or seal inside a polythene bag and maintain an optimum temperature of 15-18C . </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Germination should take place in 30-60 days .</span></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">PROPAGATION-SMOKE TREATMENT</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Smoke treatment is absolutely essential for some Australian native plants and greatly improves germination in others. Simply put, the chemicals in smoke 'break' the seed's dormancy which is the first stage of germination - no smoke, no germination!</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">There are several methods of smoke treatment short of lighting a bushfire in your backyard. The simplest method is to sow the seed and cover them with smoke impregnated vermiculite as part of the sowing process. When you water, the chemicals are slowly leached out of the vermiculite and bathe the seed in smoke chemicals.</span></p> <p><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Growing Instructions:</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Transplant seedlings when large enough to handle into 7.5cm pots. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Over-winter at a temperature of about 5C. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Harden off and plant out when all risk of frost has passed in full sun or semi-shade. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; font-size: 12pt;">Will be ok outside in mild areas but protect in cold areas with fleece or by maintaining in a container and over-wintering in a frost free place</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 31 (3 S)
Purple Apple Berry Seeds (Billardiera longiflora) 2.5 - 5
Banana Musa Ornata Seeds

Banana Musa Ornata Seeds

Price €2.75 (SKU: V 32)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Banana Musa Ornata Seeds</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>beautiful and very easy to grow Musa Ornata Purple. Originally from India this 9 foot plant is hardy to zones 9-11. It can benefit from slow release fertilizer and kept in full sun. It has beautiful pestfree foliage and a reddish midrib running down the 6 foot leaf. This easy to grow plant with yellowish edible fruit is very good growing in containers also. The seeds need to be soaked for 24 hrs and then sown 1" deep and kept at 68 - 77 degrees with light. These can take anywhere from 8 weeks to 4 months to germinate.</div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Pour hot water over the seeds and left them in water 24 hours.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">28-30 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-6 Monts</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <div><span style="color: #008000;"><em> </em></span></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 32
Banana Musa Ornata Seeds
Cashew Nut Seeds Cashew Apple (Anacardium occidentale)

Cashew Nut Seeds Cashew...

Price €3.45 (SKU: V 33)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong><strong>Cashew Nut Seeds  Cashew Apple (Anacardium occidentale)</strong><br /></strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div> <p>The<span> </span><b>cashew tree</b><span> </span>(<i>Anacardium occidentale</i>) is a tropical evergreen tree that produces the cashew<span> </span>seed<span> </span>and the cashew<span> </span>apple.<span> </span>It can grow as high as 14 m (46 ft), but the dwarf cashew, growing up to 6 m (20 ft), has proved more profitable, with earlier maturity and higher yields.</p> <p>The species is native to<span> </span>Central America, the<span> </span>Caribbean Islands, and<span> </span>northern South America.<span> </span>Portuguese colonists in Brazil began exporting cashew nuts as early as the 1550s.<span> </span>In 2017,<span> </span>Vietnam,<span> </span>India, and<span> </span>Ivory Coast<span> </span>were the major producers.</p> <p>The cashew seed, often simply called a cashew, is widely consumed. It is eaten on its own, used in recipes, or processed into cashew cheese or<span> </span>cashew butter. The shell of the cashew seed yields derivatives that can be used in many applications including lubricants, waterproofing, paints, and arms production, starting in World War II.<span> </span>The cashew apple is a light reddish to yellow fruit, whose pulp can be processed into a sweet,<span> </span>astringent<span> </span>fruit drink or distilled into liquor.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Etymology">Etymology</span></h2> <p>Its English name derives from the Portuguese name for the fruit of the cashew tree<span> </span><i>caju</i><span> </span>(Portuguese pronunciation: [kaˈʒu]), which itself is derived from the<span> </span>Tupian<span> </span>word<span> </span><i>acajú</i>, literally meaning "nut that produces itself".<sup id="cite_ref-morton_1-2" class="reference">[1]</sup>The generic name "Anacardium" (derived from Greek ἀνά (aná), meaning "outside," and καρδία (kardía), meaning "heart", refers to the unusual location of the seed (the heart) outside of the fruit.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Habitat_and_growth">Habitat and growth</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d5/Cashew_Flower.JPG/200px-Cashew_Flower.JPG" width="200" height="150" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Flower of cashew tree</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/34/Cajueiro_Meconta.jpg/200px-Cajueiro_Meconta.jpg" width="200" height="133" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Cashew tree</div> </div> </div> <p>The cashew tree is large and<span> </span>evergreen, growing to 14 m (46 ft) tall, with a short, often irregularly shaped trunk. The<span> </span>leaves<span> </span>are spirally arranged, leathery textured, elliptic to obovate, 4–22 cm (1.6–8.7 in) long and 2–15 cm (0.79–5.91 in) broad, with smooth margins. The<span> </span>flowers<span> </span>are produced in a<span> </span>panicle<span> </span>or<span> </span>corymb<span> </span>up to 26 cm (10 in) long; each flower is small, pale green at first, then turning reddish, with five slender, acute<span> </span>petals<span> </span>7–15 mm (0.28–0.59 in) long.<span> </span>The largest cashew tree in the world<span> </span>covers an area around 7,500 m<sup>2</sup>(81,000 sq ft); it is located in<span> </span>Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.</p> <p>The fruit of the cashew tree is an<span> </span>accessory fruit<span> </span>(sometimes called a pseudocarp or false fruit).<sup id="cite_ref-morton_1-3" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>What appears to be the fruit is an oval or<span> </span>pear-shaped<span> </span>structure, a<span> </span>hypocarpium, that develops from the<span> </span>pedicel<span> </span>and the receptacle of the cashew flower.<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup><span> </span>Called the cashew apple, better known in Central America as<span> </span><i>marañón</i>, it ripens into a yellow or red structure about 5–11 cm (2.0–4.3 in) long. It is edible and has a strong "sweet" smell and taste.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (March 2018)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></p> <p>The true fruit of the cashew tree is a kidney or boxing-glove shaped<span> </span>drupe<span> </span>that grows at the end of the cashew apple. The drupe develops first on the tree, and then the pedicel expands to become the cashew apple.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_1-4" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>Within the true fruit is a single<span> </span>seed, which is often considered a<span> </span>nut, in the culinary sense. The seed is surrounded by a double shell containing an allergenic<span> </span>phenolic<span> </span>resin,<span> </span>anacardic acid, a potent skin<span> </span>irritant<span> </span>chemically related to the better-known allergenic oil<span> </span>urushiol<span> </span>which is also a<span> </span>toxin<span> </span>found in the related<span> </span>poison ivy. Some people are<span> </span>allergic<span> </span>to cashews, but cashews are a less frequent<span> </span>allergen<span> </span>than tree nuts or<span> </span>peanuts.<sup id="cite_ref-Rosen_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <p>While the cashew plant is native to northeast<span> </span>Brazil, the<span> </span>Portuguese<span> </span>took it to<span> </span>Goa, India, between 1560 and 1565. From there, it spread throughout Southeast Asia and eventually Africa.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cashew_nut_and_shell">Cashew nut and shell</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/16/Shelling_cashews.jpg/220px-Shelling_cashews.jpg" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> A woman uses a machine to shell cashews in Phuket, Thailand.</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3c/CashewSnack.jpg/220px-CashewSnack.jpg" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Cashews as a snack</div> </div> </div> <p>Culinary uses for cashew seeds in<span> </span>snacking<span> </span>and cooking are similar to those for all tree seeds called nuts.</p> <p>Cashews are commonly used in<span> </span>Indian cuisine<span> </span>and<span> </span>Pakistani cuisine, whole for garnishing sweets or curries, or ground into a paste that forms a base of sauces for curries (e.g.,<span> </span><i>korma</i>), or some sweets (e.g.,<span> </span><i>kaju barfi</i>). It is also used in powdered form in the preparation of several Indian sweets and desserts. In<span> </span>Goan cuisine, both roasted and raw kernels are used whole for making curries and sweets. Cashews are also used in<span> </span>Thai<span> </span>and<span> </span>Chinese cuisines, generally in whole form. In the Philippines, cashew is a known product of<span> </span>Antipolo, and is eaten with<span> </span><i>suman</i>. The province of<span> </span>Pampanga<span> </span>also has a sweet dessert called<span> </span><i>turrones de casuy</i>, which is cashew<span> </span>marzipan<span> </span>wrapped in white wafers. In<span> </span>Indonesia, roasted and salted cashews are called<span> </span><i>kacang mete</i><span> </span>or<span> </span><i>kacang mede</i>, while the cashew apple is called<span> </span><i>jambu monyet</i><span> </span>(translates in English to monkey rose apple).</p> <p>In the 21st century, cashew cultivation increased in several African countries to meet the demands for manufacturing<span> </span>cashew milk, a<span> </span>plant milk<span> </span>alternative to<span> </span>dairy milk.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup><span> </span>In<span> </span>Mozambique,<span> </span><i>bolo polana</i><span> </span>is a cake prepared using powdered cashews and mashed potatoes as the main ingredients. This dessert is popular in South Africa.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>In<span> </span>Brazil, cashew fruit juice and the fruit pulp are used in the production of sweets, juice, alcoholic beverages, such as<span> </span><i>cachaça</i>, and as a flour, milk or cheese.<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[9]</sup><span> </span>In<span> </span>Panama, the cashew fruit is cooked with water and sugar for a prolonged time to make a sweet, brown, paste-like dessert called<span> </span><i>dulce de marañón</i>, with<span> </span><i>marañón</i><span> </span>as a Spanish name for cashew.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (November 2018)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></p> <p>The<span> </span>shell<span> </span>of the cashew nut contains oil compounds which may cause<span> </span>contact dermatitis<span> </span>similar in severity to that of poison ivy, primarily resulting from the<span> </span>phenolic lipids,<span> </span>anacardic acid, and<span> </span>cardanol.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup><span> </span>Due to the possible dermatitis, cashews are typically not sold in the shell to consumers.<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup><span> </span>Readily and inexpensively extracted from the waste shells, cardanol is under research for its potential applications in<span> </span>nanomaterials<span> </span>and<span> </span>biotechnology.<sup id="cite_ref-hamad_12-0" class="reference">[12]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Production">Production</span></h2> <table class="wikitable"> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Cashew production (kernels), 2017</th> </tr> <tr> <td><center>Country</center></td> <td><center>Production<br /><small>(tonnes)</small></center></td> </tr> <tr> <td><center><span class="flagicon"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/21/Flag_of_Vietnam.svg/23px-Flag_of_Vietnam.svg.png" width="23" height="15" class="thumbborder" /> </span>Vietnam</center></td> <td><center>863,060</center></td> </tr> <tr> <td><center><span class="flagicon"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/4/41/Flag_of_India.svg/23px-Flag_of_India.svg.png" width="23" height="15" class="thumbborder" /> </span>India</center></td> <td><center>745,000</center></td> </tr> <tr> <td><center><span class="flagicon"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fe/Flag_of_C%C3%B4te_d%27Ivoire.svg/23px-Flag_of_C%C3%B4te_d%27Ivoire.svg.png" width="23" height="15" class="thumbborder" /> </span>Côte d'Ivoire</center></td> <td><center>711,000</center></td> </tr> <tr> <td><center><span class="flagicon"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/99/Flag_of_the_Philippines.svg/23px-Flag_of_the_Philippines.svg.png" width="23" height="12" class="thumbborder" /> </span>Philippines</center></td> <td><center>222,541</center></td> </tr> <tr> <th><center><b>World</b></center></th> <th><center><b>3,971,046</b></center></th> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><small>Source:<span> </span>FAOSTAT<span> </span>of the<span> </span>United Nations<sup id="cite_ref-FAOSTAT_13-0" class="reference">[13]</sup></small></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In 2017, global production of cashew nuts (as the<span> </span>kernel) was 3,971,046<span> </span>tonnes, led by<span> </span>Vietnam,<span> </span>India<span> </span>and<span> </span>Côte d'Ivoire<span> </span>with 22%, 19%, and 18% of the world's total respectively (table).<span> </span>Benin,<span> </span>Guinea-Bissau,<span> </span>Tanzania,<span> </span>Mozambique,<span> </span>Indonesia, and<span> </span>Brazilalso had significant production of cashew kernels.</p> <p>In 2014, rapid growth of cashew cultivation in<span> </span>Côte d'Ivoire<span> </span>made this country the top African exporter.<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup><span> </span>Fluctuations in world market prices, poor working conditions, and low pay for local harvesting have caused discontent in the cashew nut industry.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference">[17]</sup></p> <p>The cashew tree is cultivated in the tropics between 25°N and 25°S, and is supremely adapted to hot lowland areas with a pronounced dry season, where the mango and tamarind trees also thrive.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup><span> </span>The traditional cashew tree is tall (up to 14 m) and takes three years from planting before it starts production, and eight years before economic harvests can begin. More recent breeds, such as the dwarf cashew trees, are up to 6 m tall, and start producing after the first year, with economic yields after three years. The cashew nut yields for the traditional tree are about 0.25 metric tons per hectare, in contrast to over a ton per hectare for the dwarf variety. Grafting and other modern tree management technologies are used to further improve and sustain cashew nut yields in commercial orchards.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutrition">Nutrition</span></h2> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Cashews, raw</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>553 kcal (2,310 kJ)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>30.19 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Starch</th> <td>23.49 g</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sugars <div>lactose</div> </th> <td>5.91 g <div>0.00 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>3.3 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>43.85 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Saturated</th> <td>7.783 g</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Monounsaturated</th> <td>23.797 g</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Polyunsaturated</th> <td>7.845 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>18.22 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Vitamins</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin A</th> <td>0 IU</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine<span> </span><span>(B1)</span></th> <td> <div>37%</div> 0.423 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin<span> </span><span>(B2)</span></th> <td> <div>5%</div> 0.058 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Niacin<span> </span><span>(B3)</span></th> <td> <div>7%</div> 1.062 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Pantothenic acid<span> </span><span>(B5)</span></th> <td> <div>17%</div> 0.86 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>6</span></th> <td> <div>32%</div> 0.417 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Folate<span> </span><span>(B9)</span></th> <td> <div>6%</div> 25 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>12</span></th> <td> <div>0%</div> 0 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 0.5 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin D</th> <td> <div>0%</div> 0 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin E</th> <td> <div>6%</div> 0.90 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin K</th> <td> <div>32%</div> 34.1 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Minerals</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>4%</div> 37 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Copper</th> <td> <div>110%</div> 2.2 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>51%</div> 6.68 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>82%</div> 292 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Manganese</th> <td> <div>79%</div> 1.66 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>85%</div> 593 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>14%</div> 660 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Selenium</th> <td> <div>28%</div> 19.9 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sodium</th> <td> <div>1%</div> 12 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Zinc</th> <td> <div>61%</div> 5.78 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Other constituents</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Water</th> <td>5.20 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><hr /> <div class="wrap">Link to USDA Database entry</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg =<span> </span>micrograms • mg =<span> </span>milligrams</li> <li>IU =<span> </span>International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap"><sup>†</sup>Percentages are roughly approximated using<span> </span>US recommendations<span> </span>for adults.<span> </span><br /><span class="nowrap"><span>Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In a 100-gram serving, raw cashews provide 553<span> </span>Calories, 67% of the<span> </span>Daily Value<span> </span>(DV) in total fats, 36% DV of<span> </span>protein, 13% DV of<span> </span>dietary fiber<span> </span>and 11% DV of<span> </span>carbohydrates(table).<sup id="cite_ref-USDA_19-0" class="reference">[19]</sup><span> </span>Cashews are rich sources (&gt; 19% DV) of<span> </span>dietary minerals, including particularly copper,<span> </span>manganese,<span> </span>phosphorus, and<span> </span>magnesium<span> </span>(79-110% DV), and of<span> </span>thiamin,<span> </span>vitamin B<sub>6</sub><span> </span>and<span> </span>vitamin K<span> </span>(32-37% DV) (table).<sup id="cite_ref-USDA_19-1" class="reference">[19]</sup><span> </span>Iron,<span> </span>potassium,<span> </span>zinc, and<span> </span>selenium<span> </span>are present in significant content (14-61% DV) (table).<sup id="cite_ref-USDA_19-2" class="reference">[19]</sup><span> </span>Cashews (100 grams, raw) contain 113 milligrams (1.74 gr) of<span> </span>beta-sitosterol.<sup id="cite_ref-USDA_19-3" class="reference">[19]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Allergy">Allergy</span></h3> <p>For some 6% of people, cashews can lead to complications or<span> </span>allergic reactions<sup id="cite_ref-allen_20-0" class="reference">[20]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-eu_21-0" class="reference">[21]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-22" class="reference">[22]</sup><span> </span>which may be life-threatening.<sup id="cite_ref-eu_21-1" class="reference">[21]</sup><span> </span>These allergies are triggered by the proteins found in tree nuts, and cooking often does not remove or change these proteins. Reactions to cashew and tree nuts can also occur as a consequence of hidden nut ingredients or traces of nuts that may inadvertently be introduced during food processing, handling, or manufacturing, particularly in people of European descent.<sup id="cite_ref-allen_20-1" class="reference">[20]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-eu_21-2" class="reference">[21]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cashew_oil">Cashew oil</span></h2> <p>Cashew oil is a dark yellow oil for cooking or salad dressing pressed from cashew nuts (typically broken chunks created during processing). This may be produced from a single cold pressing.<sup id="cite_ref-23" class="reference">[23]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Cashew_shell_oil">Cashew shell oil</span></h3> <div class="hatnote navigation-not-searchable">See also:<span> </span>Urushiol</div> <p>Cashew nutshell liquid (CNSL) or cashew shell oil (CAS registry number<span> </span>8007-24-7) is a natural<span> </span>resin<span> </span>with a yellowish sheen found in the<span> </span>honeycomb structure<span> </span>of the cashew<span> </span>nutshell, and is a byproduct of processing cashew nuts. It is a raw material of multiple uses in developing drugs, antioxidants, fungicides, and<span> </span>biomaterials.<sup id="cite_ref-hamad_12-1" class="reference">[12]</sup><span> </span>It is used in tropical<span> </span>folk medicine<span> </span>and for antitermite<span> </span>treatment of timber.<sup id="cite_ref-clay_24-0" class="reference">[24]</sup><span> </span>Its composition varies depending on how it is processed.</p> <ul> <li>Cold,<span> </span>solvent-extracted<span> </span>CNSL is mostly composed of<span> </span>anacardic acids<span> </span>(70%),<sup id="cite_ref-cen_25-0" class="reference">[25]</sup><span> </span>cardol<span> </span>(18%) and<span> </span>cardanol<span> </span>(5%).<sup id="cite_ref-hamad_12-2" class="reference">[12]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-epa_26-0" class="reference">[26]</sup></li> <li>Heating CNSL<span> </span>decarboxylates<span> </span>the anacardic acids, producing a technical grade of CNSL that is rich in cardanol.<span> </span>Distillation<span> </span>of this material gives distilled, technical CNSL containing 78% cardanol and 8% cardol (cardol has one more<span> </span>hydroxyl<span> </span>group than cardanol).<sup id="cite_ref-epa_26-1" class="reference">[26]</sup><span> </span>This process also reduces the degree of thermal<span> </span>polymerization<span> </span>of the unsaturated alkyl-phenols present in CNSL.</li> <li>Anacardic acid is also used in the chemical industry for the production of cardanol, which is used for resins, coatings, and frictional materials.<sup id="cite_ref-cen_25-1" class="reference">[25]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-epa_26-2" class="reference">[26]</sup></li> </ul> <p>These substances are skin allergens, like the oils of poison ivy, and present danger during manual cashew processing.<sup id="cite_ref-clay_24-1" class="reference">[24]</sup></p> <p>This natural oil phenol has been found to have interesting chemical structural features which enable a range of chemical modifications to create a wide spectrum of biobased<span> </span>monomers<span> </span>capitalizing on the chemically versatile construct, containing three different<span> </span>functional groups: the<span> </span>aromatic ring, the<span> </span>hydroxyl group, and the<span> </span>double bonds<span> </span>in the flanking<span> </span>alkyl<span> </span>chain. These can be split into key groups, used as<span> </span>polyols, which have recently seen a dramatic increase in demand for their biobased origin and key chemical attributes such as high reactivity, range of functionalities, reduction in blowing agents, and naturally occurring fire retardant properties in the field of ridged polyurethanes aided by their inherent phenolic structure and larger number of reactive units per unit mass.<sup id="cite_ref-hamad_12-3" class="reference">[12]</sup></p> <p>CNSL may be used as a resin for<span> </span>carbon composite<span> </span>products.<sup id="cite_ref-27" class="reference">[27]</sup><span> </span>CNSL-based<span> </span>Novolac<span> </span>is another versatile industrial monomer deriving from cardanol typically used as a<span> </span>reticulating<span> </span>agent for<span> </span>epoxy<span> </span>matrices in<span> </span>composite<span> </span>applications providing good thermal and mechanical properties to the final composite material.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cashew_apple">Cashew apple</span></h2> The cashew apple, also called cashew fruit, is the fleshy part of the cashew fruit attached to the cashew nut.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_1-5" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>The top end of the cashew apple is attached to the stem that comes off the tree. The bottom end of the cashew apple attaches to the cashew nut, which is encased in a shell. In botanical terms, the cashew apple is an<span> </span>accessory fruit<span> </span>that grows on the cashew seed (which is the nut). <p>The cashew apple can be eaten fresh, cooked in curries, or fermented into vinegar, as well as an alcoholic drink. It is also used to make preserves, chutneys, and jams in some countries such as India and Brazil. In many countries, particularly in South America, the cashew apple is used to flavor drinks, both alcoholic and nonalcoholic.<sup id="cite_ref-morton_1-6" class="reference">[1]</sup></p> <p>Cashew nuts are more widely traded than cashew apples, because the apple, unlike the nut, is easily bruised and has very limited shelf life.<sup id="cite_ref-:0_28-0" class="reference">[28]</sup><span> </span>Cashew apple juice, however, may be used for manufacturing blended juices.<sup id="cite_ref-:0_28-1" class="reference">[28]</sup></p> <p>In cultures that consume cashew apples its<span> </span>astringency<span> </span>is sometimes removed by steaming the fruit for five minutes before washing it in cold water; alternatively, boiling the fruit in salt water for five minutes or soaking it in gelatin solution also reduces the astringency.<sup id="cite_ref-29" class="reference">[29]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Alcohol">Alcohol</span></h3> <p>In<span> </span>Goa, the cashew apple is mashed and the juice extracted and kept for fermentation for a few days. Fermented juice then undergoes a double distillation process. The resulting beverage is called<span> </span><i>feni</i><span> </span>or fenny.<span> </span><i>Feni</i><span> </span>is about 40–42% alcohol. The single-distilled version is called<span> </span><i>urrac</i>, which is about 15% alcohol.</p> <p>In the southern region of<span> </span>Mtwara,<span> </span>Tanzania, the cashew apple (<i>bibo</i><span> </span>in<span> </span>Swahili) is dried and saved. Later, it is reconstituted with water and fermented, then distilled to make a strong liquor often referred to by the generic name,<span> </span><i>gongo</i>.</p> <p>In Mozambique, cashew farmers commonly make a strong liquor from the cashew apple. It is known under various names in the local languages of Mozambique (muchekele in Emakua spoken in the North, xicadju in Changana spoken in the South). In contrast to the above-mentioned Feni of Goa, the cashew liquor made in Mozambique does not involve the extraction of the juice from the cashew apples. Following harvest and the removal of the nuts, the apples are spread on the ground under trees and courtyards and allowed to lose water and ferment. The shrivelled fruits are then used for distillation.</p> <p>According to one source,<sup id="cite_ref-Ref_to_Alcohol_in_Literature_on_Ceylon_30-0" class="reference">[30]</sup><span> </span>an alcohol had been distilled in the early 20th century from the juice of the fruit, and was manufactured in the<span> </span>West Indies.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Animal_feed">Animal feed</span></h2> <p>Discarded cashew nuts unfit for human consumption, alongside the residues of oil extraction from cashew kernels, can be used to feed livestock. Animals can also eat the leaves of cashew trees.</p> </div> <div></div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds previously with sandpaper roughen then kept in cold water for 24 hours.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-2 cm (Bulge upward)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">25-28 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <div></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </body> </html>
V 33 Y
Cashew Nut Seeds Cashew Apple (Anacardium occidentale)

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Chilean guava Seeds (Ugni molinae) 2.8 - 3

Chilean guava Seeds (Ugni...

Price €3.50 (SKU: V 35)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Chilean guava Seeds (Ugni molinae)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Ugni molinae, commonly known as Chilean guava, or strawberry myrtle, is a shrub native to Chile and adjacent regions of southern Argentina. The Mapuche Native American name is "Uñi". It is in the same botanical family as the Guava. The fruit is sometimes marketed as "Ugniberry", as "New Zealand cranberry" in New Zealand, and the name "Tazziberry" has been trademarked in Australia, but it is not a native plant to these countries.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>The Ugni is a shrub from 30 cm to 170 cm tall with evergreen foliage. In some exceptional cases the shrub can grow up to 3 m in height. The leaves are opposite, oval, 1–2 cm long and 1-1.5 cm broad, entire, glossy dark green, with a spicy scent if crushed. The flowers are drooping, 1 cm diameter with four or five white or pale pink petals and numerous short stamens; the fruit is a small red, white or purple berry 1 cm diameter. In its natural habitat; the Valdivian temperate rain forests the fruit matures in autumn from March to May.</p> <p>It was first described by Juan Ignacio Molina (hence its name) in 1782. It was introduced to England in 1844 by the botanist and plant collector William Lobb, where it became a favorite fruit of Queen Victoria. It is also grown as an ornamental plant.</p> <p>The fruit is cultivated to a small extent. The usage of the fruit in cuisine is limited to southern Chile where it grows. It is used to make the traditional liqueur Murtado that is made of aguardiente and sugar flavored by conserving murtas inside the bottle. It is also used to make jam and the Murta con membrillo</p> <h3><strong>Cultivation   </strong></h3> <p>Ugni molinae is grown for its glossy evergreen foliage, (tolerant of close clipping), and for the profusion of small blooms, produced even on young plants. With shelter from cold winds, it will tolerate temperatures to -10ºC. Grow in full sun in a moderately fertile, well-drained soil enriched with leafmould or other well-composted organic matter. In pots, use a freely draining, medium-fertility, loam-based mix, water moderately when in growth, reducing as light levels and temperatures fall to keep just moist in winter at a minimum temperature of 5ºC. Repot every other year in early spring. Prune in spring to maintain size and shape and to remove frosted growth. Propagate by semi-ripe nodal cuttings in summer rooted in sand in a closed shaded frame or in a closed case with bottom heat. Also by basal cuttings of the current year’s growth taken in late autumn and rooted in a shaded frost-free frame, or by simple layering.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 35 (5 S)
Chilean guava Seeds (Ugni molinae) 2.8 - 3

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Plant resistant to cold and frost
Common guava Seeds (Psidium...

Common guava Seeds (Psidium...

Price €2.15 (SKU: V 38)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Common guava, Yellow guava, Lemon guava Seeds (Psidium guajava)</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Widely planted and naturalized in its native tropical America and in many other warm regions of the world, this tender evergreen shrub or small tree is prized for its delicious yellow-skinned, pink- or yellow-fleshed fruits, which are wonderful fresh and in preserves and juices. Ripening from fall into winter, the fragrant, round to pear-shaped, apple-sized, seedy fruits are preceded in early summer by mildly fragrant white flowers that have a boss of central stamens. Plants are self-fruitful, requiring no companion plants for fruit set. Attractive ribbed elliptic leaves are copper-tinged upon emergence. The flaking copper-colored bark adds further all-season interest.</p> <p>This warmth-loving plant prefers ample sun and well-drained acidic to alkaline soil. It needs warm but not overly hot summers – give it partial shade if necessary to protect it from excessive heat. Use it in tropical gardens or in a warm humid greenhouse. It is considered a noxious exotic weed in Hawaii and other areas. (SOURCE: learn2grow.com)</p> <p>The guava seems indiscriminate as to soil, doing equally well on heavy clay, marl, light sand, gravel bars near streams, or on limestone; and tolerating a pH range from 4.5 to 9.4. It is somewhat salt-resistant. Good drainage is recommended but guavas are seen growing spontaneously on land with a high water table–too wet for most other fruit trees.</p> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">soak in water for 24&nbsp; hours</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">25 ° C +</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-3 months</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 38 (5 S)
Common guava Seeds (Psidium guajava)

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Nipplefruit Seeds - Cow's udder (Solanum mammosum)  - 4

Nipplefruit Seeds - Cow's...

Price €2.25 (SKU: V 39)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Nipplefruit Seeds - Cow's udder (Solanum mammosum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><em><strong>Solanum mammosum</strong></em> is commonly known as <strong>nipplefruit</strong>,<sup>[1]</sup> <strong>fox head</strong>,<sup>[2]</sup> <strong>cow's udder</strong>, or <strong>apple of Sodom</strong>, is an inedible Pan-American tropical fruit.<sup>[3]</sup> The plant is grown for ornamental purposes, in part because of the distal end of the fruit's resemblance to a human breast, while the proximal end looks like a cow's udder. It is an annual in the family Solanaceae, and part of the genus <em>Solanum</em>, making the plant a relative of the eggplant, tomato, and potato. This poisonous fruit is native to South America, but has been naturalized in Southern Mexico, Greater Antilles, Central America, and the Caribbean. The plant adapts well to most soils, but thrives in moist, loamy soil.</p> <div> <div><img alt="Nipplefruit Seeds - Cow's udder (Solanum mammosum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/be/Solanum_mammosum1.jpg/220px-Solanum_mammosum1.jpg" width="220" height="165" style="border-width:1px;" title="Nipplefruit Seeds - Cow's udder (Solanum mammosum)" /><div> <div></div> Solanum Mammosum flower and stem</div> </div> </div> <p>The plant has thin simple leaves occurring in alternating branching patterns with prominent venation. Hairy thorns cover the stem and branches of the plant. The inflorescencecontains five to eight purple elongating buds. The fruit is a berry type, and has waxy yellow skin with reddish-brown seeds. The plant is propagated by the distribution of seeds.</p> <h2>Uses</h2> <div> <div><img alt="Nipplefruit Seeds - Cow's udder (Solanum mammosum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fc/Solanum_mammosum_at_Lunar_New_Year_Fair_HK_2015.jpg/220px-Solanum_mammosum_at_Lunar_New_Year_Fair_HK_2015.jpg" width="220" height="165" style="border-width:1px;" title="Nipplefruit Seeds - Cow's udder (Solanum mammosum)" /><div> <div></div> Solanum mammosum sold at a Chinese New Year fair in Hong Kong</div> </div> </div> <p>Folkloric uses of the plant range from treating asthma with a root decoction, to curing athlete's foot by rubbing leaf juices on the skin.<sup>[<em><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (April 2017)">citation needed</span></em>]</sup> Although these medical uses are not widely practiced and vary through cultures, they are an explanation for why this plant has been cultivated.</p> <p>The fruit has been embraced by Eastern cultures. It is primarily used as decorative foliage for religious and festival floral arrangements in Asia. The fruit is imported for the creation of Chinese New Year trees, due to their golden colored fruit and the belief that the five "fingers" on the fruit represent longevity for the family. In Chinese culture, the plant is known as <em>five fingered eggplant</em> (五指茄) and in Japan it is known as <em>Fox Face</em> (フォックスフェイス).</p> <p>The juice of the fruit can be used as a detergent in place of a washing powder, making it similar to the soap nut. The Kofan People of Columbia and Ecuador use the plant as an insect repellent, primarily against cockroaches. The fruit works as a repellent because of the toxicity of steroidal glycoalkaloid.<sup>[4]</sup></p> <p>Although the fruit is poisonous, it can be cooked and eaten like a vegetable when it is unripe.<sup>[<em><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (April 2017)">citation needed</span></em>]</sup> It provides a good source of calcium, phosphorus, iron and vitamin B.<sup>[4]</sup>One way that the fruit can be prepared is boiling the whole fruit and drinking the juices once boiled. In the Philippines, not only is the fruit eaten, but the leaves are also prepared as a tea considered to be anodyne,<sup>[<em><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (April 2017)">citation needed</span></em>]</sup> a mild narcotic.</p>
V 39
Nipplefruit Seeds - Cow's udder (Solanum mammosum)  - 4

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Strawberry Tree Seeds (Arbutus Unedo) 1.75 - 1

Strawberry Tree Seeds...

Price €1.65 (SKU: V 42)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Strawberry Tree Seeds (Arbutus Unedo)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Arbutus unedo</b></i>, the<span> </span><b>strawberry tree</b>, is an<span> </span>evergreen<span> </span>shrub<span> </span>or small<span> </span>tree<span> </span>in the<span> </span>family<span> </span>Ericaceae, native to the<span> </span>Mediterranean region<span> </span>and western Europe north to western France and Ireland. Due to its presence in southwest and northwest Ireland, it is known as either "Irish strawberry tree", or cain or cane apple (from the Irish name for the tree,<span> </span><i>caithne</i><sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference">[2]</sup>), or sometimes<span> </span>Killarney<span> </span>strawberry tree.</p> <p>Despite the name, it is not the source of the common strawberry, which is obtained from<span> </span><i>Fragaria</i><span> </span>×<span> </span><i>ananassa</i>, an unrelated plant.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Taxonomy">Taxonomy</span></h2> <p><i>Arbutus unedo</i><span> </span>was one of the many species described by<span> </span>Carl Linnaeus<span> </span>in Volume One of his landmark 1753 work<span> </span><i>Species Plantarum</i>, giving it the name it still bears today.</p> <p>A study published in 2001 which analyzed<span> </span>ribosomal DNA<span> </span>from<span> </span><i>Arbutus</i><span> </span>and related genera found<span> </span><i>Arbutus</i><span> </span>to be<span> </span>paraphyletic, and<span> </span><i>A. unedo</i><span> </span>to be closely related to the other<span> </span>Mediterranean Basin<span> </span>species such as<span> </span><i>A. andrachne</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>A. canariensis</i><span> </span>and not to the western North American members of the genus.</p> <p><i>Arbutus unedo</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>A. andrachne</i><span> </span>hybridise naturally where their ranges overlap; the<span> </span>hybrid<span> </span>has been named<span> </span><i>Arbutus × andrachnoides</i><span> </span>(syn.<span> </span><i>A. × hybrida</i>, or<span> </span><i>A. andrachne × unedo</i>), inheriting traits of both parent species, though fruits are not usually borne freely, and as a hybrid is unlikely to breed true from seed. It is sold in California as Arbutus x Marina named for a district in San Francisco where it was hybridized.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/14/Deux_arbouses.JPG/220px-Deux_arbouses.JPG" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Arbutus unedo fruit</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f3/Maginje_na_Kolo%C4%8Depu.JPG/220px-Maginje_na_Kolo%C4%8Depu.JPG" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> ripe and unripe fruits and flowers</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/Badaia_-_Barranco_de_los_Goros_-_Madro%C3%B1o_02.jpg/220px-Badaia_-_Barranco_de_los_Goros_-_Madro%C3%B1o_02.jpg" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Flowers</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/87/Arbutus_or_Shammari_%28Bayda-Libya%29.jpg/220px-Arbutus_or_Shammari_%28Bayda-Libya%29.jpg" width="220" height="124" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Arbutus tree near<span> </span>Bayda<span> </span>in Libya</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8b/Strawberry_tree_berry.jpg/220px-Strawberry_tree_berry.jpg" width="220" height="295" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Fruit</div> </div> </div> <p><i>Arbutus unedo</i><span> </span>grows to 5–10 m (16–33 ft) tall, rarely up to 15 m (49 ft), with a trunk diameter of up to 80 cm (31 in). It grows in<span> </span>hardiness zones<span> </span>7–10.</p> <p>The<span> </span>leaves<span> </span>are dark green and glossy, 5–10 cm (2–4 in) long and 2–3 cm (0.79–1.18 in) broad, with a serrated margin.</p> <p>The<span> </span>hermaphrodite<span> </span>flowers<span> </span>are white (rarely pale pink), bell-shaped, 4–6 mm (0.16–0.24 in) diameter, produced panicles of 10–30 together in autumn. They are pollinated by<span> </span>bees, and have a mild sweet scent.</p> <p>The<span> </span>fruit<span> </span>is a red berry, 1–2 cm (0.39–0.79 in) diameter, with a rough surface. It matures in about 12 months, in autumn, at the same time as the next flowering. It is edible; the fruit is sweet when reddish. Seeds are often<span> </span>dispersed<span> </span>by<span> </span>frugivorous<span> </span>birds</p> <p>The name<span> </span><i><b>unedo</b></i><span> </span>is attributed to<span> </span>Pliny the Elder, who allegedly claimed that "<i>unum tantum edo</i>", meaning "I eat only one".<span> </span>It is not known whether he meant that the fruit was so good he could eat only one, or whether he meant that the fruit was uninteresting so he ate only one.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Distribution">Distribution</span></h2> <p><i>Arbutus unedo</i><span> </span>is widespread in the<span> </span>Mediterranean region: in Portugal, Spain and southeastern France; southward in Algeria, Morocco, Libya, and Tunisia, and eastward in Italy, Slovenia, Croatia, Greece, Turkey, Lebanon, Syria and Israel. It is also found in western France, Albania, Bulgaria and southwestern Ireland.</p> <p>Its<span> </span>disjunct distribution, with an isolated<span> </span>relict<span> </span>population in southwestern and northwestern Ireland, notably in<span> </span>Killarney<span> </span>and around<span> </span>Lough Gill<span> </span>in<span> </span>County Sligo, which is its most northerly stand in the world, is a remnant of former broader distribution during the milder climate of the<span> </span>Atlantic period, the warmest and moistest<span> </span>Blytt-Sernander<span> </span>period, when the climate was generally warmer than today. The red-flowered variant, named<span> </span><i>A. unedo rubra</i><span> </span>by<span> </span>William Aiton<span> </span>in 1785, was discovered growing wild in Ireland in 1835.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p><i>Arbutus unedo</i><span> </span>is quite an easy plant to cultivate, and is adaptable to many climates. Once established it is fairly<span> </span>drought resistant,<span> </span>frost<span> </span>resistant,<span> </span>shade tolerant<span> </span>and<span> </span>salt tolerant.</p> <p>Lower production of fruit mass has however been reported in case of summer droughts, and frosts in flowering time was seen to decrease the numbers of fruits.</p> <p><i>Arbutus unedo</i><span> </span>is naturally adapted to dry summer climates, and has become a very popular ornamental plant in<span> </span>California<span> </span>and the rest of the west coast of<span> </span>North America. It can grow easily in<span> </span>USDA hardiness zone<span> </span>7 or warmer.</p> <p>It also grows well in the cool, wet summers of western<span> </span>Ireland<span> </span>and<span> </span>England, and temperate regions of Europe and Asia.<span> </span>Pests<span> </span>include<span> </span>scales<span> </span>and<span> </span>thrips, and diseases include<span> </span>anthracnose,<span> </span><i>Phytophthora</i>, root rot, and<span> </span>rust.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (September 2017)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></p> <p>Unlike most of the Ericaceae,<span> </span><i>A. unedo</i><span> </span>grows well in<span> </span>basic<span> </span>(limy)<span> </span>pH soils, even though it does better in more acidic soils.</p> <p>The fruit production is not very high and is highly variable on the<span> </span>weather, and that may be part of the reason this plant is not much cultivated. The average yield in a two years study is around 46<span> </span>kg<span> </span>per<span> </span>hectare, and 180 grams per cubic metre of crown.<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[12]</sup><span> </span>However, very little work has so far been done in terms of genotype selection.</p> <p><i>Arbutus unedo</i><span> </span>has been seen to form a<span> </span>mycorrhizal<span> </span>relationship. Inoculation with<span> </span><i>Pisolithus tinctorius</i><span> </span>has shown to greatly improve the plants root mass, size, tolerance to drought and nutritional status.<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup></p> <p>In cultivation in the UK, the<span> </span>form<span> </span><i>A. unedo</i><span> </span>f.<span> </span><i>rubra</i><sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup><span> </span>and the<span> </span>cultivar<span> </span>‘Atlantic’<sup id="cite_ref-RHSPF1_17-0" class="reference">[17]</sup><span> </span>have gained the<span> </span>Royal Horticultural Society’s<span> </span>Award of Garden Merit</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Propagation">Propagation</span></h3> <p>Propagation<span> </span>can be done via<span> </span>seed,<span> </span>layering, or<span> </span>cutting.</p> <p>The seed should undergo a one month<span> </span>cold stratification<span> </span>period,<span> </span>then soaked for 5 to 6 days in warm water to improve germination success. Seedlings are prone to damp, and should be cared in the first year.</p> <p>Germination rate is low, rarely over 20%.</p> <p>Layering can take up to two years, but has a good success rate, while cutting is done with a 15–20 cm (5.9–7.9 in) long mature wood, preferably with a heel in November to December. The success rate however is not very high.<sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_uses">Culinary uses</span></h3> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/22/Arbutus_unedo_crumble_cake.jpg/220px-Arbutus_unedo_crumble_cake.jpg" width="220" height="156" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> <i>Arbutus unedo</i><span> </span>crumble cake</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Bowl_of_Strawberry_Tree_berries.jpg/220px-Bowl_of_Strawberry_Tree_berries.jpg" width="220" height="295" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Bowl of strawberry fruits</div> </div> </div> <p><i>Arbutus unedo'</i>s fruits have a high content of<span> </span>sugars<span> </span>(40%), and<span> </span>antioxidant<span> </span>vitamins such as<span> </span>vitamin C,<span> </span>beta-carotene,<span> </span>niacin,<span> </span>tocopherols, and organic acids that are precursors to<span> </span>omega-3<span> </span>and<span> </span>omega-6 fatty acids<span> </span>(nearly 9%).<sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference">[21]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-22" class="reference">[22]</sup><span> </span>They are edible fresh, but that is an uncommon consumption, especially because the mature fruit tends to bruise very easily, making transportation difficult.</p> <p>They are used mostly for jam, marmalades, yogurt and<span> </span>alcoholic beverages,<sup id="cite_ref-23" class="reference">[23]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-24" class="reference">[24]</sup><span> </span>such as the Portuguese<span> </span><i>medronho</i>, a type of strong brandy. Many regions of<span> </span>Albania<span> </span>prepare the traditional drink<span> </span>rakia<span> </span>from the fruits of the plant (mare or kocimare in<span> </span>Albanian), hence comes the name of the drink "raki kocimareje". In order to reduce the high content of<span> </span>methanol<span> </span>in the drink, the spirit is distilled twice.</p> <p>The flowers are pollinated by<span> </span>bees, and the resulting<span> </span>honey<span> </span>is bitter tasting but still considered a delicacy.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Herbal_medicine">Herbal medicine</span></h3> <p><i>Arbutus unedo'</i>s leaves have been employed in traditional and<span> </span>folk medicine<span> </span>in the form of<span> </span>a decoction<span> </span>having the following properties: astringent, diuretic, urinary anti-septic, antiseptic, intoxicant, rheumatism, tonic, and more recently, in the therapy of hypertension and diabetes.<sup id="cite_ref-28" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>The leaves are reported to have a high concentration of<span> </span>flavonol<span> </span>antioxidants, especially<span> </span>quercitin, best extracted with a decoction, and together with the fruits are a source of antioxidants.<sup id="cite_ref-30" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>The leaves also have<span> </span>anti-inflammatory<span> </span>properties<sup id="cite_ref-31" class="reference">[31]</sup><sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable secondary sources. (September 2017)">non-primary source needed</span></i>]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Ecological_design">Ecological design</span></h3> <p>In<span> </span>landscape design,<span> </span>ecosystem restoration<span> </span>or<span> </span>permaculture<span> </span>based designs,<span> </span><i>A. unedo</i><span> </span>can have many purposes. While the ornamental one is the most common, this can be a valuable plant also for restoring degraded ecosystems and preventing<span> </span>desertification. Being a pioneer plant and growing well also in poor soils, can be used in a wide array of situations.</p> <ul> <li>The<span> </span>flowers<span> </span>are a significant source of nectar and pollen for bees, while the fruits are food for the birds.</li> <li>Its salt tolerance, coupled with it being an<span> </span>evergreen, make it a good choice for wind barriers in lands close to the sea.</li> <li><i>A. unedo</i><span> </span>is<span> </span>fire resistant<span> </span>(can regrow after a fire), and being a pioneer plant can contribute to the discontinuity of fire-prone pines and eucalyptus monocultures;<sup id="cite_ref-32" class="reference">[32]</sup><span> </span>for the same reasons it is a good candidate for reforestation in Mediterranean areas.<sup id="cite_ref-33" class="reference">[33]</sup></li> <li>The dense foliage throughout the year can be a shelter for insects and small animals during the<span> </span>winter.</li> <li>Its extensive<span> </span>root system<span> </span>can help in the soil stabilization process.<sup id="cite_ref-34" class="reference">[34]</sup></li> </ul> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Other_uses">Other uses</span></h3> <ul> <li>The wood is quite hard and well suited for a various uses such as<span> </span>fire wood<span> </span>and to make<span> </span>pipes. Since it doesn't usually grow straight, it is not well suited for construction or similar uses.</li> <li>The tree is also grown as an ornamental plant, because of the nice looking and smelling of the flowers and the fruit, the interesting presence at the same time of fruits and flowers on the plant and because it is an evergreen. It is used as a single or multi-trunked<span> </span>ornamental tree, and as a specimen or<span> </span>hedge<span> </span>shrub<span> </span>in gardens and public landscapes.</li> </ul> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="History">History</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7d/Badaia_-_Barranco_de_los_Goros_-_Madro%C3%B1o_04.jpg/170px-Badaia_-_Barranco_de_los_Goros_-_Madro%C3%B1o_04.jpg" width="170" height="244" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> <i>Arbutus unedo</i>: habit</div> </div> </div> <p>Its Mediterranean habitat, elegant details of leaf and habit and dramatic show of fruit with flowers made<span> </span><i>Arbutus unedo</i><span> </span>notable in<span> </span>Classical Antiquity, when it was called Andrachne, and for which Theophrastos (4th c. BCE) wrote about it, as well as the ancient army medical herbalogist Pedanios Dioscorides [De Materia Medica, Book II-150]; in addition,<span> </span>Pliny<span> </span>thought it should not be planted where bees are kept, for the bitterness it imparts to honey.</p> <p>The first signs of its importation into northern European gardens was to 16th-century England from Ireland. In 1586 a correspondent in Ireland sent plants to the Elizabethan courtiers<span> </span>Lord Leicester<span> </span>and<span> </span>Sir Francis Walsingham.<sup id="cite_ref-Coats_35-0" class="reference">[35]</sup><span> </span>An earlier description by<span> </span>Rev. William Turner<span> </span>(<i>The Names of Herbes</i>, 1548) was probably based on hearsay. The Irish association of<span> </span><i>Arbutus</i><span> </span>in English gardens is reflected in the inventory taken in 1649 of Henrietta Maria's<span> </span>Wimbledon: "one very fayre tree, called the Irish arbutis standing in the midle parte of the sayd kitchin garden, very lovely to look upon"<sup id="cite_ref-Coats_35-1" class="reference">[35]</sup><span> </span>By the 18th century<span> </span><i>Arbutus unedo</i><span> </span>was well known enough in English gardens for<span> </span>Batty Langley<span> </span>to make the bold and impractical suggestion that it might be used for hedges, though it "will not admit of being clipped as other evergreens are."</p> <p>In the United States,<span> </span>Thomas Jefferson<span> </span>lists the plant in his<span> </span>Monticello<span> </span>gardens in 1778.</p> <p>The form<span> </span><i>A. unedo</i><span> </span>f.<span> </span><i>rubra</i><span> </span>and the hybrid<span> </span><i>A.</i><span> </span>×<span> </span><i>andrachnoides</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-38" class="reference">[38]</sup><span> </span>have gained the<span> </span>Royal Horticultural Society's<span> </span>Award of Garden Merit.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Symbolic_uses">Symbolic uses</span></h3> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/88/Hieronymus_Bosch_-_The_Garden_of_Earthly_Delights_-_Garden_of_Earthly_Delights_%28Ecclesia%27s_Paradise%29.jpg/220px-Hieronymus_Bosch_-_The_Garden_of_Earthly_Delights_-_Garden_of_Earthly_Delights_%28Ecclesia%27s_Paradise%29.jpg" width="220" height="236" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Central panel of<span> </span><i>The Garden of Earthly Delights</i><span> </span>by<span> </span>Hieronymus Bosch, described by<span> </span>José de Sigüenza<span> </span>as "The Picture of the Strawberry Tree".</div> </div> </div> <p><i>The Garden of Earthly Delights</i>, a painting by<span> </span>Hieronymus Bosch, was originally listed by<span> </span>José de Sigüenza, in the inventory of<span> </span>the Spanish Crown<span> </span>as<span> </span><i>La Pintura del Madroño</i><span> </span>– "The Painting of the Strawberry Tree".<sup id="cite_ref-39" class="reference">[39]</sup></p> <p>The tree makes up part of the<span> </span>Coat of arms of Madrid<span> </span>(<i>El oso y el madroño</i>, The Bear and the Strawberry Tree) of the city of<span> </span>Madrid,<span> </span>Spain. In the center of the city (Puerta del Sol) there is a statue of a bear eating the fruit of the<span> </span><i>Madroño</i><span> </span>tree. The image appears on city crests, taxi cabs, man-hole covers, and other city infrastructure. The fruit of the<span> </span><i>Madroño</i>tree ferments on the tree if left to ripen, so some of the bears become drunk from eating the fruits.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (June 2011)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/67/Escudo_de_Madrid.svg/170px-Escudo_de_Madrid.svg.png" width="170" height="247" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> A bear and a<span> </span><i>madroño</i>(strawberry tree) are the symbol of<span> </span>Madrid</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4d/El_oso_y_el_madro%C3%B1o_-_02.jpg/170px-El_oso_y_el_madro%C3%B1o_-_02.jpg" width="170" height="255" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Statue of the Bear and the Strawberry Tree, Madrid</div> </div> </div> <p>The tree is mentioned by Roman poet<span> </span>Ovid, in Book I: 89–112 "The Golden Age" of his<span> </span><i>Metamorphoses</i>: "Contented with food that grew without cultivation, they collected mountain strawberries and the fruit of the strawberry tree, wild cherries, blackberries clinging to the tough brambles, and acorns fallen from Jupiter’s spreading oak-tree."<sup id="cite_ref-40" class="reference">[40]</sup></p> <p>The name of the Italian promontory<span> </span>Mount Conero, situated directly south of the port of<span> </span>Ancona<span> </span>on the<span> </span>Adriatic Sea, derives from the Greek name κόμαρος (komaròs) indicating the strawberry tree which is common on the slopes of the mountain.<sup id="cite_ref-41" class="reference">[41]</sup><span> </span>Mount Conero, the only coastal high point on the Adriatic sea between<span> </span>Trieste<span> </span>and the<span> </span>Gargano<span> </span>massif in the region of<span> </span>Apulia, assists navigators to sail across the Adriatic sea since ancient times.</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/eb/Sirolo-vista_conero.jpg/220px-Sirolo-vista_conero.jpg" width="220" height="146" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Mount Conero, whose name is derived from the<span> </span>Greek<span> </span>κόμαρος (komaròs) and indicates the strawberry tree which is common on the slopes of the mountain.</div> </div> </div> <p>The poet<span> </span>Giovanni Pascoli<span> </span>dedicated a poem to the strawberry tree. He refers to the<span> </span>Aeneid<span> </span>passage in which<span> </span>Pallas, killed by<span> </span>Turnus, was posed on branches of a strawberry tree. He saw in the colours of that plant a prefiguration of the<span> </span>flag of Italy<span> </span>and considered Pallas the first<span> </span><i>national cause martyr</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-43" class="reference">[43]</sup><span> </span>Pascoli's ode says:</p> <div class="div-col columns column-width"> <p><span class="languageicon">(in Italian)</span></p> <blockquote class="templatequote"> <p>O verde albero italico, il tuo maggio<i></i></p> <p><i>è nella bruma: s'anche tutto muora,</i></p> <p><i>tu il giovanile gonfalon selvaggio</i></p> <p><i>spieghi alla bora</i></p> </blockquote> <blockquote class="templatequote"> <p>Oh green Italian tree, your May month<i></i></p> <p><i>is in the mist: if everything die,</i></p> <p><i>you, the youthful wild banner</i></p> <p><i>unfold to the northern wind</i></p> </blockquote> </div> <p>In the Italian<span> </span>Risorgimento<span> </span>the strawberry tree, because of its autumnal colours, the same colours of the Italian flag, at the same time red for fruits and white for flowers, beyond the green colour of leaves, was considered, indeed, a symbol of the flag.</p> <h2><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arbutus_unedo" target="_blank" title="Source: Wikipedia Arbutus unedo, the Strawberry Tree" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Source: Wikipedia Arbutus unedo, the Strawberry Tree</strong></a></h2> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1-2 months in moist soil at 2-5 ° C in a refrigerator </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round&gt; Autumn / Winter preferred</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Cover lightly with substrate</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">18-20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">until it germinates </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
V 42
Strawberry Tree Seeds (Arbutus Unedo) 1.75 - 1
Skunkbush Sumac Seeds (rhus trilobata) 1.9 - 1

Skunkbush Sumac Seeds (rhus...

Price €2.90 (SKU: V 49)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Skunkbush Sumac Seeds (rhus trilobata) </strong><strong>Exotic Fruit<br /></strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A low deciduous shrub that offers attractive flowers in spring and bright fruits and foliage in fall, skunkbush sumac is native to western North America. In mid-spring before the leaves emerge, conspicuous clusters of pale yellow flowers appear at the stem tips. Small berries follow, ripening red in late summer. Resembling poison ivy foliage, the downy three-lobed leaves are mildly glossy and medium to dark green. The leaflets have blunt-toothed edges. Bruised leaves release a malodorous scent. In autumn, the foliage turns fiery colors. </p> <p>Skunkbush sumac does best in full sun and moderately moist soil, with the brightest autumn color produced under such conditions. In drier soil plants are smaller. Use this extremely hardy shrub as a loose low screen at the edge of a woodland or building, or to clothe a bank or other erosion-prone site. Plants may sucker and form a thicket in some conditions.</p> <p>Genus: Rhus  </p> <p>Species: trilobata</p> <p>Common Name: Skunkbush Sumac</p> <p>Other Name: Schamltzia trilobata, Rhus Canadensis var. Trilobata, Quailbush</p> <p>Pre-treatment: required</p> <p>Zone Hardiness Cold: 4</p> <p>Zone Hardiness warm: 7</p> <p>Plant Type: Small Shrub</p> <p>Height / Width: 1-2m/2-3m</p> <p>Growth rate: medium</p> <p>Vegetation type: decidious</p> <p>Leaf /Flower color: green/yellow-green</p> <p>Light</p> <p>Conditions : Light Conditions </p> <p>Unless a site is completely exposed, light conditions will change during the day and even during the year. The northern and eastern sides of a house receive the least amount of light, with the northern exsposure being the shadiest. The western and southern sides of a house receive the most light and are conidered the hottest exposures due to intense afternoon sun.</p> <p>You will notice that sun and shade patterns change during the day. The western side of a house may even be shady due to shadows cast by large trees or a structure from an adjacent property. If you have just bought a new home or just beginning to garden in your older home, take time to map sun and shade throughout the day. You will get a more accurate feel for your site's true light conditions.</p> <p>Conditions : Full to Partial Sun </p> <p>Full sunlight is needed for many plants to assume their full potential. Many of these plants will do fine with a little less sunlight, although they may not flower as heavily or their foliage as vibrant. Areas on the southern and western sides of buildings usually are the sunniest. The only exception is when houses or buildings are so close together, shadows are cast from neighboring properties. Full sun usually means 6 or more hours of direct unobstructed sunlight on a sunny day. Partial sun receives less than 6 hours of sun, but more than 3 hours. Plants able to take full sun in some climates may only be able to tolerate part sun in other climates. Know the culture of the plant before you buy and plant it!</p> <p>Watering</p> <p>Conditions : Moist and Well Drained </p> <p>Moist and well drained means exactly what it sounds like. Soil is moist without being soggy because the texture of the soil allows excess moisture to drain away. Most plants like about 1 inch of water per week. Amending your soil with compost will help improve texture and water holding or draining capacity. A 3 inch layer of mulch will help to maintain soil moisture and studies have shown that mulched plants grow faster than non-mulched plants.</p> <p>Planting</p> <p>How-to : Planting Shrubs </p> <p>Dig a hole twice the size of the root ball and deep enough to plant at the same level the shrub was in the container. If soil is poor, dig hole even wider and fill with a mixture half original soil and half compost or soil amendment.</p> <p>Carefully remove shrub from container and gently separate roots. Position in center of hole, best side facing forward. Fill in with original soil or an amended mixture if needed as described above. For larger shrubs, build a water well. Finish by mulching and watering well.</p> <p>If the plant is balled-and-burlapped, remove fasteners and fold back the top of natural burlap, tucking it down into hole, after you've positioned shrub. Make sure that all burlap is buried so that it won't wick water away from rootball during hot, dry periods. If synthetic burlap, remove if possible. If not possible, cut away or make slits to allow for roots to develop into the new soil. For larger shrubs, build a water well. Finish by mulching and watering well.</p> <p>If shrub is bare-root, look for a discoloration somewhere near the base; this mark is likely where the soil line was. If soil is too sandy or too clayey, add organic matter. This will help with both drainage and water holding capacity. Fill soil, firming just enough to support shrub. Finish by mulching and watering well.</p> <p>Problems</p> <p>Diseases : Verticillium or Fusarium Wilt </p> <p>Wilts may be contracted through infected seed, plant debris, or soil. This fungus begins and multiplies during the cool, moist season, becoming obvious when weather turns warm and dry. Plants wilt because the fungus damages their water conducting mechanisms. Overfertilization can worsen this problem. Able to overwinter in soil for many years, it is also carried and harbored in common weeds.</p> <p>Prevention and Control: If possible, select resistant varieties. Keep nitrogen-heavy fertilizers to a minimum as well as over-irrigating as they encourage lush growth. Practice crop rotation and prune out or better yet remove infected plants.</p> <p>Fungi : Powdery Mildew </p> <p>Powdery Mildew is usually found on plants that do not have enough air circulation or adequate light. Problems are worse where nights are cool and days are warm and humid. The powdery white or gray fungus is usually found on the upper surface of leaves or fruit. Leaves will often turn yellow or brown, curl up, and drop off. New foliage emerges crinkled and distorted. Fruit will be dwarfed and often drops early.</p> <p>Prevention and Control: Plant resistant varieties and space plants properly so they receive adequate light and air circulation. Always water from below, keeping water off the foliage. This is paramount for roses. Go easy on the nitrogen fertilizer. Apply fungicides according to label directions before problem becomes severe and follow directions exactly, not missing any required treatments. Sanitation is a must - clean up and remove all leaves, flowers, or debris in the fall and destroy.</p> <p>Pest : Caterpillars </p> <p>Caterpillars are the immature form of moths and butterflies. They are voracious feeders attacking a wide variety of plants. They can be highly destructive and are characterized as leaf feeders, stem borers, leaf rollers, cutworms and tent-formers.</p> <p>Prevention and Control: keep weeds down, scout individual plants and remove caterpillars, apply labeled insecticides such as soaps and oils, take advantage of natural enemies such as parasitic wasps in the garden and use Bacillus thuringiensis (biological warfare) for some caterpillar species.</p> <p>Fungi : Leaf Spots </p> <p>Leaf spots are caused by fungi or bacteria. Brown or black spots and patches may be either ragged or circular, with a water soaked or yellow-edged appearance. Insects, rain, dirty garden tools, or even people can help its spread.</p> <p>Prevention and Control: Remove infected leaves when the plant is dry. Leaves that collect around the base of the plant should be raked up and disposed of. Avoid overhead irrigation if possible; water should be directed at soil level. For fungal leaf spots, use a recommended fungicide according to label directions.</p> <p>Pest : Scale Insects </p> <p>Scales are insects, related to mealybugs, that can be a problem on a wide variety of plants - indoor and outdoor. Young scales crawl until they find a good feeding site. The adult females then lose their legs and remain on a spot protected by its hard shell layer. They appear as bumps, often on the lower sides of leaves. They have piercing mouth parts that suck the sap out of plant tissue. Scales can weaken a plant leading to yellow foliage and leaf drop. They also produce a sweet substance called honeydew (coveted by ants) which can lead to an unattractive black surface fungal growth called sooty mold.</p> <p>Prevention and Control: Once established they are hard to control. Isolate infested plants away from those that are not infested. Cosnult your local garden center professional or Cooperative Extension office in your county for a legal recommendation regarding their control. Encourage natural enemies such as parasitic wasps in the garden.</p> <p>Miscellaneous</p> <p>Conditions : Deer Tolerant </p> <p>There are no plants that are 100% deer resistant, but many that are deer tolerant. There are plants that deer prefer over others. You will find that what deer will or will not eat varies in different parts of the country. A lot of it has to do with how hungry they are. Most deer will sample everything at least once, decide if they like it or not and return if favorable. A fence is the good deer barrier. You may go for a really tall one (7 to 8 feet), or try 2 parallel fences, (4 to 5 feet apart). Use a wire mesh fence rather than board, since deer are capable of wiggling through a 12 inch space.</p> <p>Conditions : Pollution Tolerant </p> <p>Air pollution is becoming a bigger problem each day. Pollutants in our air damage plants. The plants are damaged by absorbing sulfur dioxide, ozone, peroxyacetyl nitrate, ethylene, and nitrogen dioxide through their pores. Cell membrane damage may result in leaf drop, blotched or burnt looking leaves, or off-colored tissue between veins. Vehicles and industrial processes are the key culprits and conditions worsen on hot summer days. Though planting only pollution tolerant plants is not the solution to this problem, it is a visual bandaid. Your Cooperative Extension Service may have a list of plants that are more pollution tolerant in your area. </p> <p>Conditions : Rabbit Tolerant </p> <p>As cute as they are, rabbits can really damage a vegetable garden. Young, tender lettuce plants seem to be their favorite. If a free-roaming dog is not a possiblility for you, consider installing raised vegetable beds and covering tender shoots with netting. If you have ample room, you can opt to plant enough for you and the bunnies. Scents don't always repel animals, as they get used to them and are often washed off in the rain. </p> <p>Conditions : Slope Tolerant </p> <p>Slope tolerant plants are those that have a fibrous root system and are often plants that prefer good soil drainage. These plants assist in erosion control by stabilizing/holding the soil on slopes intact. </p> <p>Conditions : Wind Tolerant </p> <p>Plants that are wind tolerant usually have flexible, strong branches that are not brittle. Wind tolerant plants often have thick or waxy leaves that control moisture loss from whipping winds. Native plants are often the best adapted to not only wind, but also soil and other climatic conditions. </p> <p>Conditions : Fall Color </p> <p>Fall color is the result of trees or shrubs changing colors according to complex chemical formulas present in their leaves. Depending on how much iron, magnesium, phosphorus, or sodium is in the plant, and the acidity of the chemicals in the leaves, leaves might turn amber, gold, red, orange or just fade from green to brown. Scarlet oaks, red maples and sumacs, for instance, have a slightly acidic sap, which causes the leaves to turn bright red. The leaves of some varieties of ash, growing in areas where limestone is present, will turn a regal purplish-blue.</p> <p>Although many people believe that cooler temperatures are responsible for the color change, the weather has nothing to do with it at all. As the days grow shorter and the nights longer, a chemical clock inside the trees starts up, releasing a hormone which restricts the flow of sap to each leaf. As fall progresses, the sap flow slows and chlorophyll, the chemical that gives the leaves their green color in the spring and summer, disappears. The residual sap becomes more concentrated as it dries, creating the colors of fall. </p> <p>Glossary : Deciduous </p> <p>Deciduous refers to those plants that lose their leaves or needles at the end of the growing season.</p> <p>Glossary : Shrub </p> <p>Shrub: is a deciduous or evergreen woody perennial that has multiple branches that form near its base. </p> <p>Glossary : Heat Zone </p> <p>The 12 zones of the AHS Heat Zone map indicate the average number of days each year that a given region experiences ""heat days"" or temperatures over 86 degrees F(30 degrees Celsius). That is the point at which plants begin suffering physiological damage from heat. The zones range from Zone 1 (less than one heat day) to Zone 12 (more than 210 heat days). The AHS Heat Zone, which deals with heat tolerance, should not be confused with the USDA Hardiness Zone system which deals with cold tolerance. For example: Seattle, Washington has a USDA Hardiness Zone of 8, the same as Charleston, South Carolina; however Seattle's Heat Zone is 2 where Charleston's Heat Zone is 11. What this says is that winter temperature in the two cities may be similar, but because Charleston has significantly warmer weather for a longer period of time, plant selection based on heat tolerance is a factor to consider. </p> <p>Glossary : Plant Characteristics </p> <p>Plant characteristics define the plant, enabling a search that finds specific types of plants such as bulbs, trees, shrubs, grass, perennials, etc. </p> <p>Glossary : Medium Shrub </p> <p>A medium shrub is generally between 3 and 6 feet tall. </p> <p>Glossary : Flower Characteristics </p> <p>Flower characteristics can vary greatly and may help you decide on a ""look or feel"" for your garden. If you're looking for fragrance or large, showy flowers, click these boxes and possibilities that fit your cultural conditions will be shown. If you have no preference, leave boxes unchecked to return a greater number of possibilities. </p> <p>Glossary : Foliage Characteristics </p> <p>By searching foliage characteristics, you will have the opportunity to look for foliage with distinguishable features such as variegated leaves, aromatic foliage, or unusual texture, color or shape. This field will be most helpful to you if you are looking for accent plants. If you have no preference, leave this field blank to return a larger selection of plants. </p> <div> </div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">pour over with hot water + Soak about 24 hrs</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Just lightly cover with substrate</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">min. 20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">until it germinates </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <div><span style="color: #008000;"><em> </em></span></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table>
V 49 (5 S)
Skunkbush Sumac Seeds (rhus trilobata) 1.9 - 1

This product is best seller product

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Kumquats or cumquats Seeds...

Kumquats or cumquats Seeds...

Price €2.95 (SKU: V 50)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Kumquats or cumquats Seeds - exotic tropical fruit</strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Kumquats or cumquats are a group of small fruit-bearing trees in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, either forming the genus Fortunella, or placed within Citrus sensulato. The edible fruit closely resembles that of the orange (Citrus sinensis), but it is much smaller and ovular, being approximately the size and shape of an olive. The English name "kumquat" derives from the Cantonese pronunciation gam1 gwat1 (given in Jyutping romanization).</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">They are slow-growing evergreen shrubs or short trees, from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (8 to 15 ft) tall, with dense branches, sometimes bearing small thorns. The leaves are dark glossy green, and the flowers white, similar to other citrus flowers, borne singly or clustered in the leaf-axils. Depending on size, the kumquat tree can produce hundreds or even thousands of fruits each year.[1] The tree can be hydrophytic, with the fruit often found floating on water near shore during the ripe season.[citation needed]</span></p> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">The plant is native to south Asia and the Asia-Pacific region. The earliest historical reference to kumquats appears in literature of China in the 12th century. They have long been cultivated in Japan, Taiwan, the Philippines, and southeast Asia. They were introduced to Europe in 1846 by Robert Fortune, collector for the London Horticultural Society, and shortly thereafter into North America.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Classification</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Carl Peter Thunberg originally classified the kumquats as Citrus japonica in his 1784 book Flora Japonica. In 1915, Walter T. Swingle reclassified them in a segregate genus, Fortunella, named in honor of Robert Fortune. Seven species of Fortunella have generally been recognized—F. japonica, F. margarita, F. crassifolia, F. hindsii, F. obovataand F. polyandra, as well as the recently described F. bawangica . The Flora of China returns the kumquat to Citrus and combines the species into the single species as Citrus japonica.[2]</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Varieties :</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Round kumquat</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">The round kumquat (also Marumi kumquat or Morgani kumquat) is an evergreen tree, producing edible golden-yellow colored fruit. The fruit is small and usually round but can be oval shaped. The peel has a sweet flavor but the fruit has a sour center. The fruit can be eaten cooked but is mainly used to make marmalade and jelly. It is grown as an ornamental plant and can be used in bonsai. This plant symbolizes good luck in China and other Asian countries, where it is sometimes given as a gift during the Lunar New Year. It's more commonly cultivated than most other kumquats as it is cold tolerant. It can be kept as a houseplant.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">When the kumquats are divided into multiple species the name Fortunella japonica (Citrus japonica) is retained by this group.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Oval kumquat</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Fortunella margarita, also known as the oval kumquat or the Nagami kumquat, is a close relative to Citrus species. It is a small evergreen tree, that can reach more than 12 ft (4 m) high and 9 ft (3 m) large. It is native to southeastern Asia, and more precisely to China. The oval kumquat has very fragrant citrus-like white flowers, and small edible oval orange fruits. The oval kumquat is an ornamental little tree, with showy foliage, flowers and fruits. It is also fairly frost-hardy, and will withstand negative temperatures such as 14 °F (-10 °C), and even a little lower for very brief periods. It can be grown in USDA hardiness zones 9 and warmer, but can also be tried in sheltered places, in USDA hardiness zone 8. Unlike most citrus species, the oval kumquat has a shorter growth period, and goes into dormancy fairly earlier in autumn. This partly explains its better frost hardiness.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Characteristics</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">The evergreen leaves of oval kumquats are deep-green and relatively small. They can reach up to 3 in (7 cm) long and 1.5 in (3.5 cm) wide. The white flowers of the oval kumquat are similar to the citrus flowers. They are strongly perfumed, and they appear relatively late in the growing season, generally late spring.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">The oval kumquat is a fruit that looks like any citrus fruit, with an orange rind. The fruits are oblong, up to 2 in (5 cm) long. Unlike the common citrus, which have a rind which is inedible raw, oval kumquats have an edible sweet rind. The flesh, however, is not as sweet as the rind, and the juice is quite acidic and sour, with a lemon-like flavor. This fruit is generally eaten fresh, with its rind. It can also be processed into preserves, jams, and other products.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Cultivation</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">The oval kumquat needs a well-drained and fertile ground. It dislikes alkaline soils. The oval kumquat is susceptible to common citrus pests and diseases.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Jiangsu kumquat</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">The Jiangsu kumquat or Fukushu kumquat bears edible fruit that can be eaten raw. The fruit can be made into jelly and marmalade. The fruit can be round or bell shaped; it is bright orange when fully ripe. It may also be distinguished from other kumquats by its round leaves that make this species unique within the genus. It is grown for its edible fruit and as an ornamental plant. It cannot withstand frost.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">When the kumquats are divided into multiple species the name Fortunella obovata (Citrus obovata) is used for this group.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Cultivation and uses</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Kumquats are cultivated in China, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, Southeast Asia, Japan, the Middle East, Europe (notably Corfu, Greece), southern Pakistan, and the southern United States (notably Florida, Louisiana, Alabama) and California.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">They are much hardier than other citrus plants such as oranges. The 'Nagami' kumquat requires a hot summer, ranging from 25 °C to 38 °C (77 °F to 100 °F), but can withstand frost down to about −10 °C (14 °F) without injury. They grow in the tea hills of Hunan, China, where the climate is too cold for other citrus fruits, even the Mikan (also known as the Satsuma) orange. The trees differ also from other citrus species in that they enter into a period of winter dormancy so profound that they will remain in it through several weeks of subsequent warm weather without putting out new shoots or blossoms. Despite their ability to survive low temperatures, kumquat trees grow better and produce larger and sweeter fruits in warmer regions.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Uses</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Kumquats are often eaten raw. As the rind is sweet and the juicy center is sour, the raw fruit is usually consumed either whole—to savor the contrast—or only the rind is eaten. The fruit is considered ripe when it reaches a yellowish-orange stage and has just shed the last tint of green.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Culinary uses include candying and kumquat preserves, marmalade, and jelly. Kumquats can also be sliced and added to salads. In recent years kumquats have gained popularity as a garnish for cocktail beverages, including the martini as a replacement for the more familiar olive. A kumquat liqueur mixes the fruit with vodka or other clear spirit. Kumquats are also being used by chefs to create a niche for their desserts and are common in European countries.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">The Cantonese often preserve kumquats in salt or sugar. A batch of the fruit is buried in dry salt inside a glass jar. Over time, all the juice from the fruit is diffused into the salt. The fruit in the jar becomes shrunken, wrinkled, and dark brown in color, and the salt combines with the juice to become a dark brown brine. A few salted kumquats with a few teaspoons of the brine/juice may be mixed with hot water to make a remedy for sore throats.[citation needed] A jar of such preserved kumquats can last several years and still keep its flavor.[citation needed]</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">In the Philippines and Taiwan, kumquats are a popular addition to green tea and black tea, either hot or iced.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 10pt;">In Vietnam, kumquat bonsai trees (round kumquat plant) are used as a decoration for the Tết (Lunar New Year) holiday. Kumquat fruits are also boiled or dried to make a candied snack called mứt quất.</span></div> <div> <div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; all year round &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;">0.5-1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;">min. 20° C.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;">Until it Germinates 7days - 2 Months</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000; font-size: 10pt;">Seeds Gallery 05.11.2012.</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </div> </div>
V 50 N
Kumquats or cumquats Seeds (Fortunella margarita)

Plant resistant to cold and frost
American Highbush Cranberry Seeds Viburnum trilobum Shrub 1.95 - 1

American cranberry bush...

Price €2.45 (SKU: V 52)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>American cranberry bush Seeds (Viburnum trilobum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Hardy, Adaptable, Easy to Grow, Showy Flowers, Fall Color, Showy Edible Fruits, Attracts Birds and Butterflies, Wildlife Food/Shelter, Hedge/Shrub Border, Bonsai, Cold, Heat, Drought and Wind Tolerant.</p> <p>American Highbush Cranberry is not related to true cranberries; the name comes from its tart, edible red fruits.</p> <p>The American Highbush Cranberry is native to swampy woods, bogs, lake margins, pastures, thickets, slopes, and moist low places from New Brunswick to British Columbia south to New York, the Great Lakes, South Dakota, and Oregon. It is a deciduous shrub with a rounded, upright spreading and sometimes arching habit. It typically grows to 10 to 15 feet tall. The leaves are three-lobed, maple-like, shiny dark green turning an attractive yellow red or reddish-purple in the fall. In spring it features an outer ring of 3/4 inch white sterile flowers surrounding the fertile but inconspicuous inner flowers, in a 3-inch flat-topped cluster. The flowers are followed by drooping clusters of cranberry-like bright red 1/4 inch edible berries (drupes) in the fall. The berries are edible fresh off the shrub and are much less bitter than those berries found on Viburnum opulus.</p> <p>The berries are sometimes used to make jams and jellies.</p> <p><b><span>Zone:</span></b><span> 3 to 8</span></p> <p><b><span>Growth Rate:</span></b><span> Medium</span></p> <p><b><span>Plant Type:</span></b><span> Deciduous Fruiting Shrub</span></p> <p><b><span>Family:</span></b><span> </span><span lang="EN">Adoxaceae</span></p> <p><b><span>Native Range:</span></b><span> Northern North America<br /><b>Height:</b> 8 to 15 feet<br /><b>Spread:</b> 10 to 15 feet<br /><b>Shape:</b> Rounded with upright-spreading to irregular and arching branching.</span></p> <p><b><span>Bloom Time:</span></b><span> </span><span>April - May</span></p> <p><b><span>Bloom Color:</span></b><span> </span><span>White<br /><b>Flower/Fruit:</b> Small white flowers held in flat clusters followed by bright red 1/4 inch edible berries.</span></p> <p><b><span>Sun:</span></b><span> </span><span>Full sun to part shade</span></p> <p><b><span>Fall Color:</span></b><span> Yellow red or reddish-purple</span></p> <p><b><span>Drought Tolerance:</span></b><span> Moderate to High</span></p> <p><b><span>Water:</span></b><span> </span><span>Medium to wet<br /><b>Maintenance:</b> Low</span></p> <p><a name="lbl_culture"></a><b><span>Site Requirements/</span></b><span><b> Soil Tolerances</b></span><span>: Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Prefers loams with consistent moisture, but tolerates a wide range of soils. Sometimes grows in wet or boggy soils in its native habitat.</span></p> <p><span><b>Culture:</b></span><span> Very tough and easy to grow. Occasional pruning to remove oldest stems may be helpful.</span></p> <p><b><span>Uses</span></b><span> Shrub borders or foundations. Woodland margins. Hedge or screen.</span></p> <h3><b><span>Sowing </span></b><b><span lang="EN">Viburnum trilobum<span> </span></span></b><b><span>Seeds:</span></b></h3> <p><span lang="EN">American Highbush Cranberry</span><span> seed </span><span>needs a warm spell then a cold spell in order to mature the embryo and reduce the seed coat.</span></p> <p><span>For best results, please follow the instructions in the order provided.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Scarify:</span></strong><strong><span> Soak </span></strong><span>24 hours</span></p> <p><strong><span>Stratify</span></strong><strong><span> </span></strong><span>Warm 90 Days,<strong> then Cold 60 days, 40 Degrees F in a Moist Medium.</strong></span></p> <p><strong><span>Germination:</span></strong><strong><span> Sow 1/4” deep</span></strong></p> <p><span>For more information about seed pretreatment and growing trees and shrubs from seed, please download this .pdf:</span></p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/documents/1449/fcpg018.pdf " target="_blank" rel="noopener">https://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/documents/1449/fcpg018.pdf </a></strong></p> </body> </html>
V 52 (10 S)
American Highbush Cranberry Seeds Viburnum trilobum Shrub 1.95 - 1

Plant resistant to cold and frost
American Cranberry Seeds (Vaccinium macrocarpon)

American Cranberry Seeds...

Price €2.25 (SKU: V 54)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>American Cranberry Seeds (Vaccinium macrocarpon)</strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <div>Hardy, Edible Fruits, Fall Colors, Attracts Birds, Wildlife Food/Shelter, Low Growing Ground Cover, Cold Tolerant</div> <div>The American Cranberry is a low trailing, mat forming, evergreen shrub of bogs. This species is the source of the commercial cranberry. Plants typically grow 12 inches tall with a 3 to 4 foot spread and have small, glossy, leathery dark green leaves to 3/4 inch across, bronzy in spring and dark-green in summer, then turning a variety of colors in fall. Leaves turn bronze in winter. In spring thru summer, the American Cranberry features fuchsia-pink bell-shaped flowers in nodding clusters. The flowers are unique, with four turned-back petals, looking a bit like hats and beak-like stamens. Blooming is followed by edible, round, bright red berries that mature in September thru October. If massed, plants can form a carpet of green foliage. This plant can be grown for the food crop, as an ornamental or both.</div> <div>Other Names: American Cranberry, Commercial Cranberry</div> <div>Zone: 2 to 7</div> <div>Growth Rate: Less than 12 inches annually</div> <div>Plant Type: Low growing, fruiting ground cover</div> <div>Family: Ericaceae</div> <div>Native Range: United States</div> <div>Height: 0.75 to 1 foot</div> <div>Spread: 3 to 4 feet</div> <div>Shape: Low, prostrate mat</div> <div>Bloom Time: May - June  </div> <div>Bloom Color: Fuchsia pink</div> <div>Flower/Fruit: Pinkish white flowers are unique, with four turned-back petals, looking a bit like hats followed by edible bright red cranberries.</div> <div>Sun: Full Sun</div> <div>Fall Color: Evergreen to Bronze</div> <div>Drought Tolerance: Low</div> <div>Water: Medium to Wet</div> <div>Maintenance: Low</div> <div>Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Cranberry prefers a cooler climate and moist to wet soil. Best grown in damp, acidic (pH 4.0-5.2), organically rich, well-drained soil in full sun.</div> <div>Culture: Plant 2 feet apart. Self-pollinating.</div> <div>Uses: Grow in the fruit or vegetable garden for the food crop. Ornamentally, may be grown as a small scale ground cover for sunny areas or in the shrub or mixed border in front of other acid-loving plants such as azaleas and rhododendrons.</div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">soak in water for 24  hours</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">3-3 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Surface Sow, Requires light for germination</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">min. 20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">until it germinates </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table>
V 54 (10 S)
American Cranberry Seeds (Vaccinium macrocarpon)
Manchurian Apricot Seeds Prunus Armeniaca  - 5

Manchurian Apricot Seeds...

Price €4.50 (SKU: V 56)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Manchurian Apricot Seeds (Prunus armeniaca var. mandshurica)</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 10 seeds.</span> </strong></h2> <p>(The seeds are already stratified) Small fast-growing tree. Rounded, spreading form, winterhardy, and drought-resistant. Native to Manchuria and Korea. Attractive white flowers, golden-orange fall color, and edible fruit. Early flowering makes fruit production susceptible to spring frost damage. The largest tree in North Dakota is 26 feet tall with a canopy spread of 32 feet. Leaves and Buds Bud Arrangement - Alternate. Bud Color - Brownish. Bud Size - Small. Leaf Type and Shape - Simple, broad-ovate to broad elliptic. Leaf Margins - Sharply and doubly serrate, with narrow, elongated teeth.</p> <div>Leaf Surface - Glossy, smooth above; axillary tufts of hairs, below. Leaf Length - 2 to 4½ inches. Leaf Width - 1½ to 3½ inches. Leaf Color - Light green on both surfaces; yellow to orange fall color. Flowers and Fruits Flower Type - Solitary, about 1 inch across. Flower Color - Varying from almost white to pink. Fruit Type - Subglobose, peach-like drupe, can be eaten but is best suited for preserves. Fruit Color - Fruits are yellow sometimes with a blush of red.</div> <div>Form Growth Habit - Spreading. Texture - Medium, summer; medium, winter. Crown Height - 10 to 15 feet. Crown Width - 12 to 18 feet. Bark Color - Reddish-brown to cinnamon-brown. Root System - Medium in-depth, and spread. Environmental Requirements Soils Soil Texture - Grows best in loam soils. Soil pH - 6.0 to 7.5. Windbreak Suitability Group - 1, 3, 4, 4C, 5. Cold Hardiness USDA Zone 3. Water Moderately drought tolerant. Will not withstand ponding or saturated soils. Light Full sun. Uses Conservation/Windbreaks Small tree for farmstead windbreaks. Wildlife Nesting site for songbirds. Rabbits and other rodents can cause serious injury during winter. Agroforestry Products Food - Used fresh, processed and dried. Medicinal - A source of phloretin, an antibiotic. Used in cosmetics, soaps, and cold creams. Some Prunus species have been used for coughs, colds, gout and cancer research. Urban/Recreational</div> <div>Used as a specimen or as a screen. Fruits may be objectionable if used as a boulevard tree. Cultivated Varieties Mandan Apricot (Prunus armeniaca var. mandshurica ‘Mandan’) - Released by USDA, Northern Great Plains Research Station, Mandan, North Dakota. A cultivar</div> <div>seed strain. Moongold/Sungold Apricot (P. x ‘Moongold’ and ‘Sungold’) - Released by the University of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota. Siberian Apricot (P. armeniaca var. sibirica) Related Species</div> <div>American Plum (Prunus americana) Pests No major pest problems. Extracts of Prunus species are toxic to some insect pests</div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">soak in water for 24  hours</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">3 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">all year round&gt; Autumn / Winter preferred</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">1-1,5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">min. 20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">until it germinates </span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table>
V 56
Manchurian Apricot Seeds Prunus Armeniaca  - 5

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Blue Sausage Seeds Fruit...

Blue Sausage Seeds Fruit...

Price €1.90 (SKU: V 57)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Blue Sausage Seeds Fruit Shrub Decaisnea fargesii</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #e03e2d;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Dead Man's Fingers, Blue Sausage Fruit, Decaisnea fargesii</p> <p>Hardy, Easy to Grow, Fast Growth, Showy Ornamental Fruit, Fall Color, Edible Fruits, Attracts Birds, Wildlife Food/Shelter</p> <p>Decaisnea fargesii or Dead Man's Fingers is an upright, multi-stemmed, deciduous shrub and noted for its showy ornamental edible fruit. Decaisnea belongs to the chocolate vine family and is native from the Himalayas to western China. This shrub typically grows to 20 feet tall and as wide. Theleaves are bright green odd-pinnate, which can be as long as 3 feet, emerging in mid-spring. The flowers are up to 2 inch, bright green-yellow, petal-less, blooming on pendent panicles, up to 18 inches long. Although individual flowers are not particularly showy, the large racemes in bloom are interesting and attractive. Flowers give way to the piece de resistance: cylindrical, bean like seed pods up to 6 inches long that ripen to dull metallic blue in fall. It is these fruits (actually fleshy follicles) that distinguish this plant. The common names of Dead Man's Fingers, Blue Sausage Fruit, Blue Cucumber Shrub and Blue Bean Tree all convey the general message that the fruits are quite interesting and unique. Fruits will split open at maturity to reveal a large mass of seeds imbedded in edible pulp with a sweet taste, but rather insipid. Lepchas (aboriginal inhabitants of Sikkim) relish this fruit, but it is not eaten much outside its native geographic range. Dead Man's Fingers is a surprisingly apt description of what the over-ripe fruit looks, and dare we say, feels like. This is a beautiful plant in its own right, but it really shines as an annual source of excellent Halloween decorations.</p> <p>This species was discovered by Pere Paul Guillaume Farges (1844-1912) who lived in China and collected and recorded plants there from 1867 until his death. Decaisnea was originally considered to have only two species, D. insignis and D. fargesii, with the only difference between the two being that the former had yellow green fruit and the latter had blue fruit. Today, some experts continue to list two different species (see Royal Horticultural Society), but others have combined both species into D. insignis (see Flora of China).</p> <p>Other Names: Blue Sausage Fruit Tree, Blue Bean Tree, Dead Man’s Fingers, Decaisnea insignis, Blue Cucumber Shrub</p> <p>Zone: Winter hardy to USDA Zone 6-9, but may be grown further north into USDA Zone 5 where it may die to the ground in winter with roots surviving to produce new growth in spring.</p> <p>Growth Rate: Fast</p> <p>Plant Type: Deciduous shrub or small tree</p> <p>Family: Lardizabalaceae</p> <p>Native Range: Western China</p> <p>Height: 12 to 20 feet</p> <p>Spread: 12 to 20 feet</p> <p>Shape: Upright, multi-stemmed</p> <p>Bloom Time: May - June &nbsp;</p> <p>Bloom Color: Yellow-green</p> <p>Flower/Fruit: Yellow-green flowers in drooping racemes followed by exceptional metallic blue bean-like fruit pods.</p> <p>Sun: Full Sun to Part Shade</p> <p>Fall Color: Yellow</p> <p>Drought Tolerance: Low</p> <p>Water: Medium</p> <p>Maintenance: Medium</p> <p>Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: This shrub is not very hard to grow in cooler temperate climates, in a fertile, well-drained soil and it is quite frost hardy. It is intolerant of drought and hot summer climates. Keep soils consistently moist.</p> <p>Culture: Best protected from cold winds.</p> <p>Uses: Best in shrub borders or woodland gardens. Excellent Halloween decorations.</p> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">soak in water for 24&nbsp; hours</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">3 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Cover lightly with&nbsp;the substrate</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">min. 20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">until it germinates (2-8 weeks)</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 57 (5 S)
Blue Sausage Seeds Fruit Shrub Decaisnea fargesii
Sea Buckthorn Seeds...

Sea Buckthorn Seeds...

Price €1.85 (SKU: V 58)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Sea Buckthorn Seeds (hippophae rhamnoides)</strong></h2><h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2><p><i><b>Hippophae</b></i><span> </span>is a genus of<span> </span><b>sea buckthorns</b>,<span> </span>deciduous<span> </span>shrubs<span> </span>in the family<span> </span>Elaeagnaceae. The name sea buckthorn may be<span> </span>hyphenated<sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>to avoid confusion with the<span> </span>buckthorns(<i>Rhamnus</i>, family<span> </span>Rhamnaceae). It is also referred to as<span> </span><b>sandthorn</b>,<span> </span><b>sallowthorn</b>,<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>or<span> </span><b>seaberry</b>.<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>It produces orange-yellow berries, which have been used over centuries as food,<span> </span>traditional medicine, and<span> </span>skin treatment<span> </span>in Mongolia, Russia, and northern Europe, which are its origin regions.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-0" class="reference"></sup></p><p>It is an exceptionally hardy plant able to withstand winter temperatures as low as −43 °C (−45 °F).<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-1" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>Because<span> </span><i>Hippophae</i><span> </span>develops an aggressive and extensive root system, it is planted to inhibit<span> </span>soil erosion<span> </span>and is used in<span> </span>land reclamation<span> </span>for its<span> </span>nitrogen fixing<span> </span>properties,<span> </span>wildlife habitat, and soil enrichment.<sup id="cite_ref-li01_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup><span> </span><i>Hippophae</i><span> </span>berries and leaves are manufactured into various human and animal food and<span> </span>skincare<span> </span>products</p><h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Taxonomy_and_name">Taxonomy and name</span></h2><p><i>Hippophae</i><span> </span>is a small<span> </span>genus<span> </span>of Elaeagnaceae having a terminal<span> </span>taxon<span> </span>with seven<span> </span>species<span> </span>recognized, as of 2002.<sup id="cite_ref-swenson_6-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span><i>Hippophae rhamnoides</i><span> </span>is a highly variable species with eight subspecies.<sup id="cite_ref-swenson_6-1" class="reference"></sup></p><p>In ancient times, leaves and young branches from sea buckthorn were supposedly fed as a remedy to horses to support weight gain and appearance of the coat, leading to the name of the genus,<span> </span><i>Hippophae</i><span> </span>derived from<span> </span><i>hippo</i><span> </span>(horse), and<span> </span><i>phaos</i><span> </span>(shining).<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-3" class="reference"></sup></p><h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Distribution">Distribution</span></h2><div class="thumb tright"><div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Sea Buckthorn Seeds (hippophae rhamnoides)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e1/Ripe_berries_of_sea-buckthorn._Selenginsky_district%2C_Buryatia%2C_Russia.jpg/220px-Ripe_berries_of_sea-buckthorn._Selenginsky_district%2C_Buryatia%2C_Russia.jpg" width="220" height="276" class="thumbimage" title="Sea Buckthorn Seeds (hippophae rhamnoides)" /><div class="thumbcaption"><div class="magnify"></div>Ripe berries of sea-buckthorn. Selenginsky district, Buryatia, Russia</div></div></div><p><i>Hippophae rhamnoides</i>, the common sea buckthorn, is the most widespread of the species in the genus, with the ranges of its eight subspecies extending from the<span> </span>Atlantic<span> </span>coasts of Europe across to northwestern Mongolia and northwestern China.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-4" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-Bartish_7-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>In western Europe, it is largely confined to sea coasts where salt spray off the sea prevents other larger plants from outcompeting it. In central Asia, it is more widespread in dry<span> </span>semi-desert<span> </span>sites where other plants cannot survive the dry conditions.</p><p>In central Europe and Asia, it also occurs as a<span> </span>sub-alpine<span> </span>shrub above the<span> </span>tree line<span> </span>in mountains, and other sunny areas such as<span> </span>river banks<span> </span>where it has been used to stabilize<span> </span>erosion.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-5" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>They are tolerant of<span> </span>salt<span> </span>in the air and soil, but demand full sunlight for good growth and do not tolerate shady conditions near larger trees. They typically grow in dry, sandy areas.</p><p>More than 90% or about 1,500,000 ha (5,800 sq mi) of the world's natural sea buckthorn<span> </span>habitat<span> </span>is found in<span> </span>China,<span> </span>Mongolia,<span> </span>Russia,<span> </span>northern Europe, and<span> </span>Canada, where the plant is used for soil, water and wildlife conservation, anti-desertification<span> </span>purposes, and consumer products.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-6" class="reference"></sup></p><p>Sea buckthorn USDA<span> </span>hardiness zones<span> </span>are about 3 through 7.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-7" class="reference"></sup></p><h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2><p>The shrubs reach 0.5–6 metres (1.6–19.7 ft) tall, rarely up to 10 metres (33 ft) in central Asia. The leaf arrangement can be alternate or opposite.<sup id="cite_ref-swenson_6-2" class="reference"></sup></p><ul><li><i>Hippophae goniocarpa</i><span> </span>grows in mountainous regions in Nepal and China on mountain slopes, river banks, flood lands and valley terraces. The growth altitude is typically between 2650 and 3700 m. The species is divided into two distinct subspecies,<span> </span><i>H. goniocarpa</i><span> </span>subsp.<span> </span><i>litangensis</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>H. goniocarpa</i><span> </span>subsp.<span> </span><i>goniocarpa</i>.<span> </span><i>H. goniocarpa</i><span> </span>subsp.<span> </span><i>litangensis</i><span> </span>differs from the typical subspecies by the young branchlets and the lower surface of leaves.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>The Latin<span> </span>specific epithet<span> </span><i>goniocarpa</i><span> </span>refers to goniocarpus -a -um with angular fruits.<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[</sup></li><li><i>Hippophae gyantsensis</i></li><li><i>Hippophae litangensis</i></li><li><i>Hippophae neurocarpa</i></li><li><i>Hippophae rhamnoides</i>: Common sea buckthorn has dense and stiff branches, and are very thorny. The<span> </span>leaves<span> </span>are a distinct pale silvery-green, lanceolate, 3–8 cm (1.2–3.1 in) long, and less than 7 mm (0.28 in) broad. It is<span> </span>dioecious, with separate male and female plants. The male produces brownish flowers which produce wind-distributed<span> </span>pollen. The female plants produce orange<span> </span>berries<span> </span>6–9 mm (0.24–0.35 in) in diameter, soft, juicy, and rich in oils. The roots distribute rapidly and extensively, providing a nonleguminous<span> </span>nitrogen fixation<span> </span>role in surrounding soils.</li><li><i>Hippophae salicifolia</i><span> </span>(willow-leaved sea buckthorn) is restricted to the<span> </span>Himalayas, to the south of the common sea buckthorn, growing at high altitudes in dry valleys; it differs from<span> </span><i>H. rhamnoides</i><span> </span>in having broader (to 10 mm (0.39 in)) and greener (less silvery) leaves, and yellow berries. A wild variant occurs in the same area, but at even higher altitudes in the alpine zone.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (April 2007)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup><span> </span>It is a low shrub not growing taller than 1 m (3.3 ft) with small leaves 1–3 cm (0.39–1.18 in) long.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (July 2017)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></li><li><i>Hippophae tibetana</i></li></ul><div class="thumb tright"><div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Sea Buckthorn Seeds (hippophae rhamnoides)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fa/Hippopha%C3%AB-rhamnoides.JPG/220px-Hippopha%C3%AB-rhamnoides.JPG" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" title="Sea Buckthorn Seeds (hippophae rhamnoides)" /><div class="thumbcaption"><div class="magnify"></div>Common sea buckthorn</div></div></div><h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Varieties">Varieties</span></h3><p>During the<span> </span>Cold War, Russian and East German horticulturists developed new varieties with greater nutritional value, larger berries, different ripening months and branches that are easier to harvest. Over the past 20 years, experimental crops have been grown in the United States, one in<span> </span>Nevada<span> </span>and one in<span> </span>Arizona, and in several provinces of Canada.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference"></sup></p><h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Genetics">Genetics</span></h3><p>A study of nuclear<span> </span>ribosomal<span> </span>internal transcribed spacer<span> </span>sequence data<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>showed that the genus can be divided into three<span> </span>clades:</p><ul><li><i>H. tibetana</i></li><li><i>H. rhamnoides</i><span> </span>with the exception of<span> </span><i>H. rhamnoides</i><span> </span>ssp.<span> </span><i>gyantsensis</i><span> </span>(=<i>H. gyantsensis</i>)</li><li>remaining species</li></ul><p>A study using<span> </span>chloroplast<span> </span>sequences and morphology,<sup id="cite_ref-Bartish_7-1" class="reference">[7]</sup><span> </span>however, recovered only two clades:</p><ul><li><i>H. tibetana</i>,<span> </span><i>H. gyantsensis</i>,<span> </span><i>H. salicifolia</i>,<span> </span><i>H. neurocarpa</i></li><li><i>H. rhamnoides</i></li></ul><h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Natural_history">Natural history</span></h2><p>The fruit is an important winter food resource for some birds, notably<span> </span>fieldfares.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (April 2015)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></p><p>Leaves are eaten by the<span> </span>larva<span> </span>of the coastal race of the<span> </span>ash pug<span> </span>moth and by larvae of other<span> </span>Lepidoptera, including<span> </span>brown-tail,<span> </span>dun-bar,<span> </span>emperor moth,<span> </span>mottled umber, and<span> </span><i>Coleophora<span> </span>elaeagnisella</i>.</p><h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2><div class="thumb tright"><div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Sea Buckthorn Seeds (hippophae rhamnoides)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fd/Hipp%C3%B3phae_rhamno%C3%ADdes.JPG/220px-Hipp%C3%B3phae_rhamno%C3%ADdes.JPG" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" title="Sea Buckthorn Seeds (hippophae rhamnoides)" /><div class="thumbcaption"><div class="magnify"></div>Common sea buckthorn</div></div></div><h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Products">Products</span></h3><p>Sea buckthorn berries are edible and nutritious, though<span> </span>astringent,<span> </span>sour, and oily<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>unless 'bletted' (frosted<span> </span>to reduce the astringency) and/or mixed as a drink with sweeter substances such as<span> </span>apple<span> </span>or<span> </span>grape<span> </span>juice. Additionally,<span> </span>malolactic fermentation<span> </span>of sea buckthorn juice reduces sourness, enhancing its sensory properties. The mechanism behind this change is transformation of<span> </span>malic acid<span> </span>into<span> </span>lactic acid<span> </span>in microbial metabolism.<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference"></sup></p><p>When the berries are pressed, the resulting sea buckthorn juice separates into three layers: on top is a thick, orange cream; in the middle, a layer containing sea buckthorn's characteristic high content of saturated and<span> </span>polyunsaturated fats; and the bottom layer is<span> </span>sediment<span> </span>and juice.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-8" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-seglina_14-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>Containing fat sources applicable for cosmetic purposes, the upper two layers can be processed for skin creams and<span> </span>liniments, whereas the bottom layer can be used for edible products such as<span> </span>syrup.<sup id="cite_ref-seglina_14-1" class="reference"></sup></p><p>Besides juice, sea buckthorn fruit can be used to make<span> </span>pies,<span> </span>jams,<span> </span>lotions,<span> </span>teas,<span> </span>fruit wines, and<span> </span>liquors.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-9" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>The juice or pulp has other potential applications in foods, beverages, or cosmetics products.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-10" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>Fruit drinks were among the earliest sea buckthorn products developed in China. Sea buckthorn-based juice is common in<span> </span>Germany<span> </span>and<span> </span>Scandinavian countries. It provides a beverage rich in<span> </span>vitamin C<span> </span>and<span> </span>carotenoids.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-11" class="reference"></sup></p><p>For its troops confronting low winter temperatures (see<span> </span>Siachen), India's<span> </span>Defence Research Development Organization<span> </span>established a factory in<span> </span>Leh<span> </span>to manufacture a multivitamin herbal beverage based on sea buckthorn juice.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference"></sup></p><p>The seed and pulp oils have nutritional properties that vary under different processing methods.<sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup><span> </span>Sea buckthorn oils<span> </span>are used as a source for ingredients in several commercially available<span> </span>cosmetic<span> </span>products and<span> </span>nutritional supplements.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-12" class="reference"></sup></p><h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Landscape_uses">Landscape uses</span></h3><p>Sea buckthorn may be used as a<span> </span>landscaping<span> </span>shrub with an aggressive<span> </span>basal shoot<span> </span>system used for barrier hedges and windbreaks, and to stabilize riverbanks and steep slopes.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-13" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>They have value in northern climates for their landscape qualities, as the colorful berry clusters are retained through winter.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-14" class="reference">[4]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-li01_5-1" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference">[17]</sup><span> </span>Branches may be used by florists for designing ornaments.</p><p>In northwestern China, sea buckthorn shrubs have been planted on the bottoms of dry riverbeds to increase water retention of the soil, thus decreasing sediment loss.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-15" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>Because of increased moisture conservation of the soil and nitrogen-fixing capabilities of sea buckthorn, vegetation levels have increased in areas where sea buckthorn have been planted.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup><span> </span>Sea buckthorn was once distributed free of charge to Canadian prairie farmers by<span> </span>PFRA<span> </span>to be used in<span> </span>shelterbelts.<sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup></p><h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Folk_medicine_and_research">Folk medicine and research</span></h2><p>Sea buckthorn has been used over centuries in traditional medicine.<sup id="cite_ref-Li_4-16" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>Although seabuckthorn fruit<span> </span>extracts<span> </span>are under preliminary research for their<span> </span>pharmacological<span> </span>effects, there is no<span> </span>high-quality clinical evidence<span> </span>for the ability of<span> </span><i>Hippophae</i><span> </span>products to lower the risk of human diseases,<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_21-0" class="reference">[21]</sup><span> </span>and are not approved as<span> </span>prescription drugs<span> </span>by any national<span> </span>regulatory agency, as of 2019. Berry oil from seeds or fruit pulp, either taken orally as a<span> </span>dietary supplement<span> </span>or applied<span> </span>topically, is believed to be a skin softener or medicine, but there is inadequate clinical evidence of its effectiveness.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_21-1" class="reference">[21]</sup><span> </span>There have been no systematic studies of<span> </span>toxicity<span> </span>and safety for any<span> </span><i>Hippophae</i><span> </span>product.<sup id="cite_ref-drugs_21-2" class="reference">[21]</sup><span> </span>The fruit of sea buckthorn contains very high amounts of oxalic acid, as well as small amounts of vitamin B12, which is rare in plants.<sup id="cite_ref-22" class="reference">[22]</sup></p><h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Organizations">Organizations</span></h2><p>In 2005, the "EAN-Seabuck" network between<span> </span>European Union<span> </span>states, China, Russia and<span> </span>New Independent States<span> </span>was funded by the<span> </span>European Commission<span> </span>to promote sustainable crop and consumer product development. In Mongolia, there is an active National Association of Seabuckthorn Cultivators and Producers.</p><p>The International Seabuckthorn Association, formerly the International Center for Research and Training on Seabuckthorn (ICRTS), was formed jointly in 1988 by the China Research and Training Center on Seabuckthorn, the Seabuckthorn Office of the Yellow River Water Commission, and the Shaanxi Seabuckthorn Development Office. From 1995 to 2000, ICRTS published the research journal,<span> </span><i>Hippophae</i>, which appears to be no longer active.</p><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p></td></tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p></td><td valign="top"><p><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p></td></tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p></td><td valign="top"><p><span style="color:#008000;">soak in water for 24  hours</span></p></td></tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p></td><td valign="top"><p><span style="color:#008000;">3 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p></td></tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p></td><td valign="top"><p><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p></td></tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p></td><td valign="top"><p><span style="color:#008000;">1 cm</span></p></td></tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p></td><td valign="top"><p><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p></td></tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p></td><td valign="top"><p><span style="color:#008000;">min. 20 ° C</span></p></td></tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p></td><td valign="top"><p><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p></td></tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p></td><td valign="top"><p><span style="color:#008000;">until it germinates </span></p></td></tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p></td><td valign="top"><p><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p></td></tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"><p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p></td><td valign="top"><p><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p></td></tr></tbody></table>
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Sea Buckthorn Seeds (hippophae rhamnoides)