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Organic Butternut Pumpkin...

Organic Butternut Pumpkin...

Price €4.15 (SKU: VG 16)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em><strong>Organic Butternut Pumpkin seeds</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 40 seeds. </strong></span></h3> <div>Very versatile with a sweet nutty taste. <span style="font-size:11px;line-height:1.5em;">Delicious as a roast or steamed vegetable or as an alternative to pumpkin in pies, roasts or soups. </span></div> <div> Sow seeds in clumps of 3-5 seeds, spacing each clump 60cm (2ft) apart. Place the seeds on their edges to ensure they don't rot and keep moist. </div> <div> Thin to the strongest seedling in each group when they emerge.</div> <div>Harvest when the stalks become dry.</div> <div>Fruits store for 3-4 months if kept dry not damaged.</div>
VG 16 (40 S)
Organic Butternut Pumpkin seeds
Pumpkin seeds Queensland Blue Seeds Gallery - 6

Pumpkin seeds Queensland Blue

Price €2.05 (SKU: VG 44)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Pumpkin seeds Queensland Blue</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>This popular <strong>Australian heirloom</strong> was introduced to the US in 1932 and is sometimes called the Australian Blue Pumpkin. The Queensland Blue Squash is a striking blue colored, turban shaped fruit with a flavorful, sweet golden colored flesh. It is a great tasting roasting pumpkin or can be used in soups.  This squash produces fruits weighing 5-13 kg. Queensland Blue Squash squash stores well and can be stored in a cool, dry location for 1-6 months.</div>
VG 44 O (10 S)
Pumpkin seeds Queensland Blue Seeds Gallery - 6

Variety from Japan
Japanese Hokkaido Squash Seeds 1.95 - 2

Japanese Hokkaido Squash Seeds

Price €1.95 (SKU: VG 3)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Japanese Hokkaido Squash Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 10-15 (2g) seeds.<br /></strong></span></h2> <div>Red kuri squash (katakana: ウチキクリ) is thick-skinned orange colored winter squash that has the appearance of a small pumpkin without the ridges. Inside the hard outer skin there is a firm flesh that provides a very delicate and mellow chestnut-like flavor. Red kuri squash is a cultivated variety of the species Cucurbita maxima. The variety is listed as follows: C. maxima Duchesne ssp. maxima convar. maxima 'Red Kuri'. Other varieties of this subspecies include 'Hokkaido', 'Red Hokkaido' and 'Sweet Meat' squashes.</div> <div> </div> <div>History</div> <div>It is generally believed that all squash originated in Mesoamerica, but may have been independently cultivated elsewhere, albeit later.</div> <div>Red kuri squash is commonly called Japanese Squash, Orange Hokkaido Squash[5], Baby Red Hubbard Squash, or the Uchiki Kuri Squash. In Japan, the word kuri may refer to either the squash discussed in this article or to Japanese chestnuts. In France it is called Potimarron, and in the United Kingdom it is commonly called Onion Squash.</div> <div>Primarily grown in Japan, California, Florida, Southwestern Colorado, Mexico, Tasmania, Tonga, New Zealand, Chile, Provence and South Africa, red kuri is widely adapted for climates that provide a growing season of 100 days or more. Most of the California, Colorado, Tonga and New Zealand crops are exported to Japan.</div> <div>Red kuri squash consumption has increased since squash appreciation has increased in cuisines worldwide. This is because of the availability of winter and summer varieties throughout the year. Healthier eating has also increased this nutritious vegetable's popularity.</div> <div>Characteristics</div> <div>This hardy squash grows to maturity in full sun and is drought tolerant. Each vine produces multiple teardrop-shaped fruits, usually three. The squash matures after about ninety days after blooming.</div> <div>The squash is hard shelled winter variety with firm yellow flesh. The flesh often has a green tint under the seeds.</div> <div>Culinary uses</div> <div>Red kuri prepared for cooking.</div> <div>Full-flavored, sweet and very fond of butter and fresh herbs, red kuri squash is a perfect ingredient for a variety of soups, stews and casseroles. Make cakes, quick breads, muffins, cookies and pies with its succulent nutty-tasting flesh. Excellent baked, boiled, microwaved, steamed, sautéed or fried, this special squash adds sweet flavor and texture to stir-fries. Its seed cavity is ideal for stuffing.</div> <div>Nutrition</div> <div>Red kuri squash is a good source of fiber. It also provides vitamin A and vitamin C, some of the B vitamins, calcium, potassium, iron, riboflavin and thiamine. Low in calories and sodium, this deep-colored squash also contains beta-carotene.</div> <div>FRESH SEEDS</div> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VG 3 (2g)
Japanese Hokkaido Squash Seeds 1.95 - 2
Table Queen Acorn Squash Seeds  - 2

Table Queen Acorn Squash Seeds

Price €2.25 (SKU: VG 42)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Table Queen Acorn Squash Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This dark green squash is acorn-shaped, hence its name. The golden-orange flesh offers a mildly sweet flavor and a somewhat dry texture. Usually about five to eight inches long and four to five inches across, the hardy rind has deep, characteristic ridges with a splash of yellow-gold, considered a sign of maturity.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional Value</strong></p> <p>Not as rich in beta-carotene as other Winter varieties, acorn squash is an excellent source of dietary fiber and contains vitamin C, vitamin B6, magnesium and manganese plus a substantial amount of potassium.</p> <p><strong>Applications</strong></p> <p>Acorn squash are a hard-skinned, Winter variety. They may be peeled, but are more often cooked with their skin-on. Peel and dice, or cut into slices along the natural ribs; toss with oils, spices or herbs and bake or roast. Serve with or without the skin. Cooked squash may be pureed and added to soups, stews, risotto, cakes or other baked goods. Stuff and bake halves with meats, cheese, grains or other vegetables. Acorn squash will keep at room temperature for many weeks.</p> <p><strong>Geography/History</strong></p> <p>The Acorn squash was a favorite of early civilizations as it could be baked whole in their outdoor clay and brick ovens. Dating back to 4000 B.C., acorn squash, sometimes called Danish squash, is an edible gourd that grows on a vine. Generally considered to be a winter squash, the acorn squash is a member of the same family as summer squash, Cucurbita pepo.</p> <p> </p>
VG 42 (10 S)
Table Queen Acorn Squash Seeds  - 2
Red Turban Squash Seeds Seeds Gallery - 5

Red Turban Squash Seeds

Price €1.95 (SKU: VG 49)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Red Turban Squash Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Turban squash can range in color from mottled green, orange to yellow in color, often displaying all of these colors on a single squash. At its blossom end is a turban-like cap, thus its name. This ornamental and edible variety can measure ten to fifteen inches in diameter and is heavy for its size. Wrapped in a thin but hard shell, the fine-textured orange flesh can vary from mild to sweet depending upon variety. When cooked the flesh has a floury texture that lends itself well to soups and stews.</p> <p>(C. maxima) 95 days.</p> <p><strong>Current Facts</strong><strong><br /></strong>The Turban squash, botanically classified as part of Cucurbita maxima, is a group of squashes known for having a shape similar to that of their namesake. Commonly known types are Turk’s Turban, French Turban, American Turban, and Marina di Chioggia. Due to the Turban squash's bright colors, unique shape, and semi-bland flavor, it is most frequently used today as an ornamental squash. </p> <p><strong>Nutritional Value</strong><strong><br /></strong>Turban squash is an excellent source of vitamin A and offers a good source of vitamin C, calcium, fiber, and potassium, plus notable amounts beta-carotene. </p> <p><strong>Applications</strong><strong><br /></strong>The large size and unique shape of the Turban squash make it a task to cut. Typically the acorn like protrusion is sliced off first then both that and the round cap are cut into wedges or cubes. The cut squash can then be cooked and then once cooled the skin removed. Turban squash shines when baked, roasted, and steamed. Cooked squash can be used whole as an accompaniment to meats and vegetable mains or pureed and added to soups, stews, and sauces as a thickener. The mild flesh of this winter squash pairs well with a wide range of companion ingredients such as pear, apple, chard, corn, kale, parsley, cilantro, nutmeg, cardamom, brown sugar, butter, cream, melting and hard cheeses, toasted nuts, ground beef, bacon, and roasted chicken. To store: keep the whole, uncut, squash in a cool dry place. Care should be taken to not damage the cap of the squash as it is the most delicate part of the Turban squash and where rot is most likely to occur first. Once cut it is best to wrap cut pieces in plastic and store in the refrigerator for up to one week. </p> <p><strong>Ethnic/Cultural Info</strong><br />The Turban squash was known in France as Giraumon Turban and images of it can be found in Vilmorin-Andrieux’s famous album of illustrations, Les Plantes Potagères. A reprint book of his illustrations uses a close-up of the Turban squash featured on plate No. 23 originally illustrated in 1871 as the book’s cover photo. </p> <p><strong>Geography/History</strong><br />The Turban squash is first mentioned in the 1818 publication of Le Bon Jardinier. Prior to 1818, there was no doubt turban shaped varieties though eating quality was so poor that there is little documentation of these varieties. A variety known as the French Turban is said to predate 1820, its flavor was bland and texture watery, so it was predominantly used as an ornamental. This French Turban, however, would go on to be parent along with the hubbard, acorn, and autumnal marrow to the American Turban which offered a much more desirable flavor and texture. Turban squash grows on vines which can reach eight to ten feet in length. Squash tends to be ready for harvest within 115 days of planting and should be harvested before the first hard frost of the season. <strong></strong></p>
VG 49 (5 S)
Red Turban Squash Seeds Seeds Gallery - 5
Small Fruited, Mini Butternut Squash Seeds Seeds Gallery - 5

Small Fruited, Mini...

Price €1.85 (SKU: VG 9)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Small Fruited Mini Butternut Squash Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This adorable small-fruited butternut squash has an exceptionally sweet taste perfect for just one or two servings. Compact vines are space-saving for smaller gardens or those who just want to fit more plants into the space they have. This is another AAS Winners that is perfect for container gardens and will resist powdery mildew later in the season. Culinary tip: pierce the skin then microwave whole squash for about 12 minutes, cut in half, spoon out the seeds, and enjoy!</p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1" style="width:753px;"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" valign="bottom" style="width:749px;"> <p align="center"><strong>AAS Winner Primary Details</strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Award:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;"> <p>AAS Vegetable Award Winner</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Award Type:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;"> <p>National Winner</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Class:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;"> <p>Squash</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Variety Name:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;"> <p>Butterscotch</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Genus:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;"> <p>Cucurbita</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Species:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;"> <p>moschata</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Year:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;"> <p>2015</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Common Name:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;"> <p>Butternut squash</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Type:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;"> <p>Vegetables</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Breeder:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;"> <p>Seeds Gallery</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Close Market Comparison:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;"> <p>Early Butternut, Metro</p> </td> </tr><tr><td colspan="2" valign="bottom" style="width:749px;"> <p align="center"><strong>Plant Needs</strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Duration Type:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;text-align:left;"> <p>Annual</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Light Needs:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;text-align:left;"> <p>Full sun</p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" style="width:247px;text-align:center;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Water Needs:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;text-align:left;"> <p>Normal</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:247px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Season Type:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;text-align:left;"> <p>Warm Season</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:247px;text-align:center;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Staking Required:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:500px;text-align:center;"> <p style="text-align:left;">NO</p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p style="text-align:left;"> </p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1" style="width:747px;height:1022px;"><tbody><tr style="text-align:left;"><td colspan="2" valign="bottom" style="width:743px;height:58px;"> <p align="center"><strong>Plant Characteristics</strong></p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Foliage Color:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p>Green</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Plant Habit:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p>Compact</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Garden Spacing:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p>5-6 square feet per plant (example: 1'x5' or 2'x3')</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Days To Harvest (Sowing Seed):</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p>100 days</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Days To Harvest (Transplant):</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p>85 days</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Fruit Color (Harvest):</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p>Tan</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Fruit Shape:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p>Butternut with straight neck</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;height:58px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Fruit Size:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;height:58px;text-align:left;"> <p>Lenght 15 cm</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;height:58px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Fruit Weight:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;height:58px;text-align:left;"> <p>500-750 g</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;height:76px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Fruit Flavor Description:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;height:76px;text-align:left;"> <p>Uncommonly sweet, with nutty undertones and lightly starchy texture</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;height:58px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">The Number Of Fruits Per Plant:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;height:58px;text-align:left;"> <p>4 or more</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;height:58px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Plant Spread:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;height:58px;text-align:left;"> <p>3 feet</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;height:76px;text-align:left;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Disease Resistances or Tolerances:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;height:76px;text-align:left;"> <p>Powdery mildew</p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td colspan="2" valign="bottom" style="width:743px;height:58px;"> <p align="center"><strong>Home Gardener Use</strong></p> </td> </tr><tr style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;height:58px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Container:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;height:58px;"> <p>YES</p> </td> </tr><tr style="height:58px;"><td valign="top" style="width:251px;text-align:left;height:58px;"> <p align="right" style="text-align:left;">Herb:</p> </td> <td valign="top" style="width:490px;height:58px;"> <p style="text-align:left;">NO</p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p><strong>How to Grow</strong></p> <p>Transplant: Sow 1-2 seeds in 1 1/2-2” cell-type containers or pots, and thin to 1-2 plants/cell with scissors. Harden plants 4-7 days by reducing fertilizer, water, and temperature, moving flats outside if there is no frost danger. Transplant after frost danger, earlier only if plants are to be covered with floating row covers, about 18” apart. Take care not to disturb roots! </p> <p>Direct seed: Sow in late spring when soil is at least 70°F (21°C) and weather settled after all frost danger. Sow 2 seeds/ft., 1" deep, in rows 3' apart. Thin plants 24" apart in the row.</p> <p>Harvest: When stems are drying, fruits have mature color, and skin is hardening, cut stems about 1" from the fruits. Handle fruits very carefully. 1 or 2 light frosts are tolerable, but a hard frost or repeated light frosts will damage fruits. </p> <p>Curing: To dry and toughen skins, expose fruits to the sun for 5-10 days, covering at night when frost is expected. To cure indoors, expose squash to 80-90°F (27-32°C) with ventilation for 3-5 days. </p> <p>Storage: Store at 50-55°F (10-13°C) with 50-75% humidity and good air circulation.</p> <p>Diseases and pests: At time of planting, cover with row cover to protect from insect pests. Control cucumber beetles, squash bugs, and vine borers with azadirachtin or pyrethrin. Control of cucumber beetles early in the season is important, as the insects spread bacterial wilt disease. Prevent disease with crop rotation and good sanitation. </p>
VG 9 (5 S)
Small Fruited, Mini Butternut Squash Seeds Seeds Gallery - 5
Yellow Round Squash - Zucchini Seeds 1.95 - 4

Yellow Round Squash -...

Price €1.95 (SKU: VG 48)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Yellow Round Squash - Zucchini Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Brings many yellow round fruits with a diameter of 12 cm. Particularly delicate and pleasantly aromatic, for gourmets. The apple-sized round fruits of this cultivation are an insider tip among gourmets.</p> <p>Similar to the yellow zucchini or the green fruits of the "Satelite" variety, they are particularly tender and have a wonderfully mild aromatic taste in their youth.</p> <p>With their golden yellow color, they look appealingly delicious in raw food or salads. They also taste sliced and steamed as an accompaniment to meat and Mediterranean grills and fish dishes.</p> <p>The bushy plants are vigorous and carry an astonishingly large amount of fruit when continuously picked.</p> <p><strong>CULTURE:</strong></p> <p>Fertile, well-drained soil with a pH of 5.8–6.8 is best. Plastic mulch and fabric row covers (AG-19 grade) can aide plant establishment and exclude insect pests during the seedling stage. Row covers should be removed when plants begin to flower. Poor fruit development may indicate insufficient pollination. For the highest quality fruit, succession plantings every 2-3 weeks may be needed.</p> <p><strong>PLANT SPACING:</strong></p> <p>Space plants 18-24" apart in rows 6' apart. Wider spacing may allow for easier harvesting.</p>
VG 48 (5 S)
Yellow Round Squash - Zucchini Seeds 1.95 - 4
Long of Naples Squash Seeds 2.05 - 2

Long of Naples Squash Seeds

Price €2.05 (SKU: VG 47)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Long of Naples Squash Seeds</strong></h2><h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2><p>C. moschata 95 days Lunga di Napoli squash is large to extremely large in size, averaging 60-120 centimeters in length and 20-70 pounds in weight, and has an oblong, cylindrical shape with a slightly bulbous end. The smooth skin ripens from yellow to a dark green-grey, and when mature, it also bears orange to light green striations. The thick flesh is dense, firm, a deep, vibrant orange, and the bulbous end encases a small cavity filled with stringy pulp and many flat, cream-colored seeds. When cooked, Lunga di Napoli is smooth and dry with a mild, slightly sweet flavor, similar to butternut squash.</p><p>Lunga di Napoli squash, botanically classified as Cucurbita moschata, is an Italian heirloom variety that grows on a long vining plant and is a member of the Cucurbitaceae family along with pumpkins and gourds. Also known as Piena di Napoli, Courge Pleine d’Alger, Long of Naples, and Courge Pleine di Naples, Lunga di Napoli is a large winter squash that is a part of what has come to be known as the neck group of squashes which contains squash with elongated necks such as butternut, crookneck, and Tahitian. Lunga di Napoli translated means "Long of Naples," and the squash is known for its enormous size, tender texture, and dense flesh.</p><p>Lunga di Napoli squash has been a popular variety in Italy for centuries, specifically in the southern regions. In Campania, Sicily, and Puglia, it is used in the regional soup known as cianfotta or giambotta and is made with chili pepper, eggplant, tomato, pears, and plums. Lunga di Napoli squash is also popularly served fried, chilled, and scapece style dressed in vinegar, oil, garlic, mint, and sugar in Sicily or chili in Campania. The squash is commonly sold in packaged slices in Europe due to its large size, and the seeds are also used as a snack food throughout Italy, served simply toasted and salted.</p><h3><strong>Geography/History</strong></h3><div>Lunga di Napoli squash is a common variety in Italy and the Mediterranean region, and mention of it can be found dating back to 1856 in Vilmorin’s classic illustrated album of French garden vegetables, The Vegetable Garden. Lunga di Napoli squash is then believed to have first appeared in an American seed catalog in 1863 listed by Fearing Burr. Though it has never caught on as a commercially viable squash variety in the United States, it has found popularity among home growers and competitive growers as a result of its ability to grow to massive sizes. Today Lunga di Napoli squash can be found at farmers markets, specialty grocers, and online seed catalogs in Europe, Asia, Australia, and the United States.</div><script type="text/javascript"></script>
VG 47 (10 S)
Long of Naples Squash Seeds 2.05 - 2
FESTIVAL Squash Seeds

FESTIVAL Squash Seeds

Price €1.95 (SKU: VG 15)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;"><strong><em>FESTIVAL Squash Seeds</em></strong></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>100 days. Cucurbita pepo. This trailing variety can be grown up supports if required.</p> <p>It produces fruit the size of large grapefruit which are ideal roasted. Semi-bush plant produces good yields of 2 lb squash that has shades of green, gold, and orange. It has flavorful golden flesh. Great baked or roasted. Alternatively, pierce the skin several times and cook in the microwave for 4-5 minutes and simply serve with butter and freshly ground pepper. This bush type plant is suitable for small gardens. A summer squash variety.</p> <p><strong>On average, they will be 4 1/2 inches wide (11 cm) by 2 1/2 inches (6 cm) tall, and weigh 1 to 2 pounds (450 to 1000g.)</strong></p>
VG 15 (5 S)
FESTIVAL Squash Seeds
Carnival Squash Seeds

Carnival Squash Seeds

Price €1.95 (SKU: VG 14)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Carnival Squash Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Carnival squash is distinguished by its deeply furrowed top-shape and of course, its variegated patterns of orange and green colors. The Carnival squash's thick exterior contains spotted and striped colors of white, orange, yellow and green, depending on its level of maturity. The presence of post-harvest green coloring indicates that the squash is still at its peak maturity. As the squashes ages, it will eventually only maintain orange and cream colors. The raw flesh of the Carnival squash is firm, dry, and pale orange in color with a large and fibrous seed cavity. When cooked its texture is soft and melting with a fragrant aroma and its flavor; slightly nutty, buttery, and sweet with nuances of maple syrup, similar to that of butternut squash.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Seasons/Availability</strong></p> <p>Carnival squash is available in the fall and winter months.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Current Facts</strong></p> <p>Carnival squash, botanically known part of Cucurbita pepo, is a hybrid of the sweet dumpling squash and the acorn squash. Classified as a type of acorn squash and a vegetable gourd the Carnival squash is a relatively new variety of squash and is sought after for its uniquely patterned and colored exterior. The color variance in the rind of the Carnival squash is the result of seasonal temperature variations with warmer temperatures producing Carnival squash with slightly more pronounced green stripes.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Nutritional Value</strong></p> <p>Carnival squash contains potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin C. Additionally they offer some calcium, magnesium, folate, omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Applications</strong></p> <p>The Carnival squash can be used in the same applications as other orange-flesh colored winter squashes such as butternut, acorn, and kabocha. It can be steamed, boiled or sautéed though the most effective way to achieve the squash's optimal flavor and texture is by roasting it. It can be roasted whole, cut in half or into pieces. After roasting Carnival squash can be blended to become soup or sauce. The roasted squash can be added to stews, risottos, curries, or pasta dishes. The squash can also be utilized as an edible vessel, as its size often lends itself to individual sized serving portions. Carnival squash is best highlighted when prepared with the addition of butter and spices such as ginger, garlic, cinnamon, nutmeg, and pepper. It pairs well with pork, lamb, other roasted winter vegetables, maple syrup, toasted walnuts and pecans, and aged cheeses such as pecorino. It is best to store Carnival squash in a cool, dark space for optimal shelf-life. If stored properly uncut squash will keep for up to a month.</p> <p> </p> <p>Ethnic/Cultural Info</p> <p>The Carnival squash was developed by plant breeder Ted Superak of Harris Seeds in North America. The Carnival squash was developed with the intent to improve upon the sweet dumpling squash. A newer squash to the commercial marketplace the Carnival has seen an increase in popularity in the United States as a result of food and lifestyle bloggers writing about finding it and utilizing it as a decorative gourd during holiday seasons and then happily discovering it additionally provides a flavorful eating squash.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Geography/History</strong></p> <p>The Carnival squash is produced from descendants of squashes native to Mexico and was introduced to the market in 1991. It is believed to be a hybrid cross of the sweet dumpling squash and a green acorn variety known as green table queen. Even though considered a winter crop, winter squash such as the Carnival need sunshine and warmer weather to flourish. Seeds should be planted after the last frost of the spring. Squash should be ready for harvest within eighty-five days of planting. Carnival squash plants grow in a semi-bush fashion which makes them an ideal squash for smaller growing spaces.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Featured Restaurants</strong></p> <p>Restaurants currently purchasing this product as an ingredient for their menu.</p> <p>Baci        San Diego CA     619-275-2094</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Recipe Ideas</strong></p> <p>Recipes that include Carnival Squash. One  is easiest, three is harder.</p> <p>Angie's Recipes                               Baked Carnival Squash with Smoked Bacon and Rosemary</p> <p>Happy Vegan Yogini                       Carnival Squash-Roasted Garlic Ravioli</p>
VG 14 (5 S)
Carnival Squash Seeds

Variety from Italy
Winter squash Seeds TROMBETTA DI ALBENGA 2.35 - 1

Winter squash Seeds...

Price €2.35 (SKU: VG 10)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Winter squash Seeds TROMBETTA DI ALBENGA</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Trombetta di Albenga is an Italian heirloom climbing winter squash. It’s a highly valuable variety, with a delicate flavor.</p> <p>The plant is a strong climber, with broad leaves, its fruits are thin, slightly crooked, trumpet-shaped, the skin is pale green when unripe and yellow when ripe.</p> <p>Fruits can grow up to 1 m long, weighing as much as 5kg, but they are usually harvested when 20-30 cm long and used as courgettes. If harvested when 10-15 cm long they are very tender and can be eaten raw. The flesh of the ripe fruits is cooked to prepare puree, soups, ravioli stuffing or cakes. Seeds can be eaten lightly toasted and salted.</p> <p>Produces long, slender, white to pale yellow, 15-inch fruit with a bulb at the bottom. Picked while young and tender, they are delicious and sweet as summer squash. If allowed to mature, this is also great as winter squash. As winter squash, it is used for stuffing in gnocchi and ravioli, &amp; for baking and pies!</p> <p>The mature fruit grows very long. Because of their unique shape and delicious flavor, they are in very high demand at specialty markets but can be a pain to store, for the same reason.</p> <p>Trombetta di Albenga grows as an Annual and is a Vegetable. Being an Annual, it tends to grow best over the course of a single year. Trombetta di Albenga is known for its Vine habit and growing to a height of approximately 2.00 meters (6.50 feet). Expect to bloom to occur in early summer.</p> <p>Italy is believed to be where Trombetta di Albenga originates from.</p> <p>This plant tends to need a moderate amount of maintenance, so ensuring that you are aware of the soil, sun, ph and water requirements for Trombetta di Albenga Winter squash is quite important to ensure you have a happy and healthy plant.</p> </body> </html>
VG 10 (3 S)
Winter squash Seeds TROMBETTA DI ALBENGA 2.35 - 1

Giant plant (with giant fruits)
Squash Seeds Jumbo Pink Banana

Squash Seeds Jumbo Pink Banana

Price €1.95 (SKU: VG 8)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Squash Seeds Jumbo Pink Banana</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 5-10 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A rarely seen winter squash variety in the UK, this is an impressive and reliable producer of huge fruits even in poor UK summers.&nbsp; The vines have the potential to grow to 20ft in any direction but are easily contained by turning them back to the centre.&nbsp; Large, pink banana-shaped fruit are produced in abundance and average 15-20lb but can easily grow to 50-60lb (4ft long) during good summers with care.&nbsp; The fruits are fine flavoured, dry with sweet orange flesh and store well in a cool frost-free location.</p> <p><strong>SUMMER SQUASH / COURGETTE / ZUCCHINI</strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; SOIL / LOCATION</strong></p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A sunny spot protected from strong winds is essential.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The soil should be well-drained and rich in humus, the more the better.&nbsp;&nbsp; When preparing the site; for bush varieties (Courgettes) allow 24in between each plant and for trailing varieties 36 – 48in.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; SOWING AND PLANTING</strong></p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; For an early start (late Mar) place a single seed edgeways 1/2inch deep in seed compost in a 3inch pot.&nbsp; The critical part is temperature, these need at least 65F continuous soil temperature (preferably more to maximise germination rates) until germinated, so a propagator, well-heated greenhouse or airing cupboard is ideal - gradually harden off seedlings after the last frost before planting outdoors.&nbsp; The most common reason for poor / zero germination is low/uneven soil temperature coupled with too much moisture.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Outdoors you can plant from around late May in southern areas if warm ( The larger seed types are still best sown in a pot to guarantee germination and soil temperature which needs to be 65F+).&nbsp; We would also advise planting up to 3 seeds per hole and thinning to the strongest, as you have less time to plant more if any fail. Make sure you protect the seedlings as they emerge, slugs and snails will love them.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; WATERING, WEEDING AND MAINTENANCE TIPS</strong></p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Keep the soil moist – water copiously around the plants, not over them.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Keep weed-free to allow air circulation.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Once the plants start to fruit, feed every 14 days with a tomato type fertilizer, these are greedy plants.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; HARVESTING AND STORAGE TIPS:</strong></p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;These will fruit early and rapidly become prolific, as the bush/vines grow.&nbsp;&nbsp; For most summer squash the key thing is to pick the fruit small and tender and they will keep fruiting all summer until the first frost.&nbsp; A knife is best to remove the fruit.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;If any fruit get to big, cut and discard to encourage new flowers.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Some people are allergic to the tiny bristles/spines on courgette leaves.&nbsp; If in doubt wear gloves.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Leave the last courgettes of the season to swell and they can be harvested as small marrows.</p> <p>· Courgettes/summer squash do not keep well for more than a week; there again you will need to be eating them quick to keep up with production.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; For spaghetti squash – keep harvesting when around 10 inches.&nbsp; These will store for 6-8 weeks max if kept cool and dry.</p> <p><strong>WINTER SQUASH / PUMPKIN</strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; SOIL / LOCATION</strong></p> <p></p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A sunny spot protected from strong winds is essential.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The soil must be well drained and rich in humus, the more the better.&nbsp; I fill each hole at least 12” square with garden compost and paper at the bottom into which goes a single plant. For bush varieties 24in between each plant is fine – 48in for vines.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Many winter Squash / Pumpkins like to sprawl out and need plenty of space. Vining Squash / Pumpkins require a larger area to run, whilst semi-vining and bush varieties of winter squash / courgette can be well contained.&nbsp; If space is tight just keep turning the branches back to the centre to prevent spreading and over-running other plants.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; SOWING AND PLANTING</strong></p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; For an early start (Mid / Late Apr) place a single seed edgeways 1/2inch deep in seed compost in a 3inch pot.&nbsp; The critical part is temperature, these need at least 65F continuous soil temperature (preferably more to maximise germination rates) until germinated, so a propagator, well heated greenhouse or airing cupboard is ideal - gradually harden off seedlings after the last frost before planting outdoors.&nbsp; The most common reason for poor / zero germination is low / uneven soil temperature coupled with too much moisture.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Outdoors from around Jun you can plant direct if the weather is warm, however I would advise planting up to 3 seeds per hole and thinning to the strongest, as you have less time to plant more if any fail. Also the plants will struggle with the shorter growing period if it is a poor wet summer.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; WATERING, WEEDING AND MAINTENANCE TIPS</strong></p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Keep the soil moist – water copiously around the plants, not over them.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Placing a mulch / black polythene before the fruit formation helps later on keeping the fruit clean and ripening.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Keep weed free to allow air circulation.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Once the fruits start to swell feed every 14 days with a tomato type fertilizer, these are greedy plants. Limit larger fruiting varieties to 2-3 fruits (for giant pumpkins 1).</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; HARVESTING AND STORAGE TIPS:</strong></p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The most important part of harvesting is making sure you harvest them before the first frost. As the Squash / Pumpkin approach maturity and are ready to harvest, you’ll notice that the fruit stems will start to dry out and wither. Depending on where you live, you can expect to start harvesting in late Aug to September.</p> <p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Because of the vast varieties of sizes and colours, the rule of thumb for harvesting winter Squash / Pumpkin is when they are a full size and have a deep rich colour. The rinds should be hard to the touch. If you harvest your winter Squashes / Pumpkins too early, they may lack flavour and not keep well.&nbsp; Before the first frost of winter and really wet weather is essential.</p> <p>Cut through the stem and remove the Squash / Pumpkin, leaving about 2 ½ inches of the stem on the fruit. A short stem can lead to rot. This may not be possible with smaller varieties, however. In these cases, preserve as much as the stem as possible. It’s also important not to damage your Squash / Pumpkin when harvesting and storing, as they can go bad more quickly. Try avoiding manually breaking the stem at all costs.</p> <p><strong>Store you Squash / Pumpkin in a dry place with temperatures under 60°F.</strong></p> <p>Winter squashes / Pumpkins are best “cured” before storing. Curing your squash requires storing them in higher temperatures (around 68°F or slightly higher) for at least fifteen days (a windowsill or greenhouse is fine). You can then move them to a cool, dry place. Never store the fruit where there is a risk of freezing.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VG 8 (1g)
Squash Seeds Jumbo Pink Banana
Ornamental squash mix seeds  - 4

Ornamental squash mix seeds

Price €2.20 (SKU: VG 17)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Ornamental squash mix seeds (Cucurbita sp.)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds. </strong></span></h2> <p>Ornamental gourds are the gaily colored, oddly shaped, squash-like, hard-skinned fruits of plants belonging to several genera and species of the Cucurbitaceae family. They are closely related to the edible squashes and pumpkins, but included with Cucurbita are a different group of genera and species such as Lagenaria siceraria, Luffa cylindrica, Benincasa hispida, and others.</p> <p><strong>DESCRIPTION</strong></p> <p>Most of the fancy gourds have long, climbing, or creeping stems. They can be grown on trellises, arbors, and fences, thus making attractive display plantings.</p> <p>However, usually, the fruit rather than the growing plant is considered ornamental. These fruit are generally most useful and attractive as ornaments when the pulp dries and the shell becomes hard. There are many shapes and colors of these fancy gourds. Some are warty, some are smooth, some long, some round, some striped, and some banded. Most of them are not grown as vegetables, although some are edible if eaten at an immature stage, such as the luffa gourd (sometimes called running okra). A few of the edible squashes are quite ornamental when mature, such as the yellow crookneck squash and the turban (Turk's cap) squash.</p> <p>While the number of varieties is quite large, with new kinds being constantly raised from seed, the following kinds are more common.</p> <p><strong>Cucurbita pepovar.ovifera</strong></p> <p>• Pear gourds: Most of this kind are pear-shaped, but vary in color and markings. Some are white and smooth; some have dark and light green stripes; some have two colors, half yellow and half green; some with two colors have bands; others may be found with these different variegations in various combinations.</p> <p>Apple and orange gourds: These small, smooth, round gourds are white or orange and slightly flattened.</p> <p>Flat fancy gourds: These pumpkin shaped gourds are small (only 2-3 inches in diameter) and are orange or mixed with various shades of green.</p> <p>Warty-skinned fancy gourds: Small round gourds with warty surfaces colored white, green, yellow, or orange.</p> <p>Lagenariaspp.</p> <p>Siphon gourds: These have a large, 8 to 12 inch broad base and a long neck that curves back alongside the base toward the ground. They should be grown on the ground rather than trellises to prevent breaking the neck.</p> <p>Calabash pipe gourds: These are shaped much like a summer crookneck squash, except they are smooth-skinned.</p> <p>Dolphin gourd: These are light green and distinctly marked by ridges and unusual configurations. They are often displayed at fairs in Florida.</p> <p>Club gourds: These are long and shaped like bowling pins.</p> <p>Birdhouse gourds: These jug shaped gourds are often made into birdhouses.</p> <p>Bottle gourds: Typically, this kind is a combination of a broad round base, a bottle-neck, and a smaller round neck. There are many sizes, some holding as much as 2 gallons.</p> <p>Others</p> <p>Turk's cap (C. maxima): This 5 to 10 pound edible turban squash has a round orange bottom with the top one-third a protruding cream colored 'acorn' or 'navel'. The rind is relatively soft and fairly smooth.</p> <p>Luffa gourds (Luffa spp.): These are also called running okra and dish-rag gourd. Some fruits have sharp ribs running lengthwise. Luffas are from 1 to 2 feet long, and their best eating quality is when they reach 1 to 2 inches in diameter. When mature, the pulp dries to the consistency of fibrous sponge that may be made into ornamental items such as hats, or used for scrubbing.</p> <p><strong>CULTURE</strong></p> <p>Since they are so closely related to squashes and pumpkins, ornamental gourds may be grown throughout Florida. In North and Central Florida, plant as soon as the danger of killing frost is past. In South Florida, plant seeds in September through March. Gourds do best if grown on a trellis because of their vining nature and for prevention of fruit rots. Hills (1 to 2 seeds each) may be spaced 12 to 24 inches apart at the base of the trellis. If planted in an open garden, allow 4 feet between vines in the row and 4 feet between rows. Plant seed 1 to 2 inches deep.</p> <p><strong>USE</strong></p> <p>Unlike edible squash, which is picked in an immature stage, gourds should be allowed to mature and dry on the vine if possible. Cut specimens with a few inches of stem attached. Use sharp shears to harvest the gourds; never twist them from the plant.</p> <p>Once harvested, the fruits may be washed in mild, warm soapy water then rinsed and dried. A month or two of drying and curing in a dry, warm, airy room may be needed. Sunlight fades colors during drying.</p> <p>During curing, the thin film-like outer skin may be scraped off. Sometimes during curing, mold growths form on the shell in attractive patterns and may be retained for decorative effect.</p> <p>As ornaments, the gourds may be used with natural colors and shape unchanged, or they may be sanded and painted in imaginative colors and designs. The odd shapes of gourds inspire certain modifications, making them into figurines. For example, the calabash gourd is often called penguin gourd since it is easily made into a penguin figurine.</p> <p>In addition to ornamental value, many practical uses are made of them, such as hanging baskets, vases, fruit bowls, dippers, smoking pipes, birdhouses, and toys.</p> </body> </html>
VG 17 (10 S)
Ornamental squash mix seeds  - 4
Ornamental Crookneck Squash Seeds

Ornamental Crookneck Squash...

Price €2.75 (SKU: VG 35)
,
5/ 5
<div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>Ornamental Crookneck Squash Seeds</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Very attractive fall and winter decorations. This unusual and hard-to-find gourd resembles a wrynecks, hence its name! Beautiful fresh or dried for attractive fall and winter decorations. Vines spread 12 ft. Size 12" x 6". Start outdoors after last frost.</p> <p>Ornamental gourds are part of the <em>Cucurbitaceae</em>family and related to edible squashes and pumpkins, but are grown to full maturity and then dried to use for decoration. They're readily available in grocery stores and farmers markets, and several types can be successfully grown in North Florida.</p> <p>Most ornamental gourds can be grown attractively on trellises, arbors, and fences. This saves space and prevents fruit rot.</p> <p>In North and Central Florida, plant as soon as the danger of killing frost is past. Gardeners in South Florida can plant seeds in September through March. Hills (1 to 2 seeds each) may be spaced 12 to 24 inches apart at the base of the trellis. If planted in an open garden, allow 4 feet between vines in the row and 4 feet between rows. Plant seed 1 to 2 inches deep.</p> <p>Unlike edible squash, which are picked in an immature stage, gourds should be allowed to mature and dry on the vine if possible. Use sharp shears to harvest the gourds; never twist them from the plant. Once harvested, the fruits may be washed in warm soapy water then rinsed and dried. A month or two of drying and curing in a dry, warm, airy room may be needed. Sunlight may fade a gourd's color during drying.</p> <p>These fruits may be used with natural colors and shapes unchanged, or they may be sanded and painted in creative colors and designs. Gourds can also be used for practical purposes, such as hanging baskets, vases, fruit bowls, dippers, birdhouses, and toys.</p> </div>
VG 35 (5 S)
Ornamental Crookneck Squash Seeds

Variety from United States of America
DELICATA Squash Seeds

Delicata squash Seeds

Price €1.65 (SKU: VG 24)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2 id="short_description_content"><strong><b>Delicata squash</b> Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Delicata squash</b><span> </span>is a variety of<span> </span>winter squash<sup id="cite_ref-stoner_1-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>with cream-colored cylindrical fruits striped in green or orange that are cooked.<sup id="cite_ref-Robinson_y_Decker-Walters_1997_2-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>As its name suggests, it has characteristically a delicate rind (or skin<sup id="cite_ref-backyard_3-0" class="reference"></sup>). It is also known as<span> </span><b>peanut squash</b>,<span> </span><b>Bohemian squash</b>, or<span> </span><b>sweet potato squash</b>. It is a cultivar of the species<span> </span><i>Cucurbita pepo</i>, which also includes the<span> </span>summer squash<span> </span>varieties<span> </span>pattypan squash,<span> </span>zucchini, and<span> </span>yellow crookneck squash, as well as winter squash varieties including<span> </span>acorn squash,<span> </span>spaghetti squash, and most<span> </span>pumpkins<span> </span>used as<span> </span>Jack-o-lanterns.</p> <p>Delicata squash is easily grown. Seeds are started after all danger of frost is past and the soil is warm or within 3–4 weeks before the predicted last frost date in the area. Seeds directly sown are placed one inch deep, 5-6 to a hill; hills are 6 feet in all directions from other hills. Roughly 105 days after germinating, delicata squash is ready to be harvested. Curing takes approximately a week in a warm, dry place that is protected from frost, such as a garage.</p> <p>Delicata squash is most commonly baked, but can also be microwaved, sautéed, or steamed. It may be stuffed with meat or vegetable mixtures and is known for its ease of cooking and creamy flavor and texture.<span> </span>The seeds of the squash are also eaten, usually after being toasted. This squash is not as rich in<span> </span>beta-carotene<span> </span>as other winter squashes but is a good source of dietary<span> </span>fiber<span> </span>and<span> </span>potassium, as well as smaller amounts of<span> </span>vitamins C<span> </span>and<span> </span>B,<span> </span>magnesium, and<span> </span>manganese.</p> <p>Indigenous to<span> </span>North<span> </span>and<span> </span>Central America, squash was introduced to early European settlers by<span> </span>Native Americans. "'Delicata' was first introduced by a seedsman in the USA in 1894 (Tapley et al. 1937), but a fruit very much like those of this cultivar was illustrated by Naudin (1856)." (Paris 1989). As a cultivar, is "more or less unique and is not readily classifiable in any one modern group" (Paris 198). The standard delicata is vinous; however, bush varieties have arisen including 'Bush Delicata'<span> </span>and seed sellers offer varieties with more sweetness as 'Sugar Loaf<span> </span>and 'Honey Boat'.<span> </span>Delicata squash almost disappeared after the Great Depression, and wasn't widely grown due to its susceptibility to mildew diseases.<span> </span>This was changed in the early 2000s, when a group at Cornell University's Department of Plant Breeding, led by<span> </span>Molly Jahn, bred a non-hybrid open-pollinated variety, Cornell's Bush Delicata that was resistant to most known squash diseases, and won the 2002 All-America Selection (AAS), a seed-industry award and is now the primary commercial cultivar.</p> </body> </html>
VG 24 (5 S)
DELICATA Squash Seeds