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Plant resistant to cold and frost
Wild Garlic, Bear's Garlic Seeds (Allium ursinum) 3 - 1

Wild Garlic, Bear's Garlic...

Price €2.35 (SKU: MHS 15)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Wild Garlic, Bear's Garlic Seeds (Allium ursinum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 50 (0.288g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Allium ursinum – known as ramsons, buckrams, wild garlic, broad-leaved garlic, wood garlic, bear leek, or bear's garlic – is a wild relative of chives native to Europe and Asia. The Latin name is due to the brown bear's taste for the bulbs and its habit of digging up the ground to get at them, they are also a favourite of wild boar. In Europe, where ramsons are popularly harvested from the wild, similarity to poisonous plants such as lily of the valley or Colchicum autumnale regularly leads to cases of poisoning.</p> <p>Allium ursinum is a bulbous, perennial herbaceous monocot, that reproduces primarily by seed. The narrow bulbs are formed from a single leaf base and produce bright green entire, elliptical leaves up to 25 cm long x 7 cm wide with a petiole up to 20 cm long. The inflorescence is an umbel of six to 20 white flowers only, lacking the bulbils produced by some other Allium species such as Allium vineale (crow garlic) and Allium oleraceum (field garlic). :394 :902 The flowers are star-like with six white tepals, about 16–20 mm in diameter, with stamens shorter than the perianth.</p> <p>It flowers in the British Isles from April to June, :394 starting before deciduous trees leaf in the spring. The flower stem is triangular in cross-section and the leaves are broadly lanceolate similar to those of the lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis).</p> <p><strong>Distribution</strong></p> <p>It is native to temperate regions of Europe, from Britain east to the Caucasus. It is common in much of the lowland British Isles with the exception of the far north of Scotland, Orkney, Shetland, and the Channel Islands.</p> <p><strong>Habitat</strong></p> <p>A. ursinum is widespread across most of Europe. It grows in deciduous woodlands with moist soils, preferring slightly acidic conditions. In the British Isles, colonies are frequently associated with bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta), especially in ancient woodland. It is considered to be an ancient woodland indicator species</p> <p><strong>Edibility</strong></p> <p>The leaves of A. ursinum are edible; they can be used as salad, herb, boiled as a vegetable, in soup, or as an ingredient for a sauce that may be a substitute for pesto in lieu of basil. The stems are preserved by salting and eaten as a salad in Russia. A variety of Cornish Yarg cheese has a rind coated in wild garlic leaves. The bulbs and flowers are also edible. It is used for preparing herbed cheese, a Van speciality in Turkey.</p> <p>The leaves are also used as fodder. Cows that have fed on ramsons give milk that tastes slightly of garlic, and butter made from this milk used to be very popular in 19th-century Switzerland.</p> <p>The first evidence of the human use of A. ursinum comes from the Mesolithic settlement of Barkær (Denmark), where an impression of a leaf has been found. In the Swiss Neolithic settlement of Thayngen-Weier (Cortaillod culture), a high concentration of pollen from A. ursinum was found in the settlement layer, interpreted by some as evidence for the use of A. ursinum as fodder.</p> <p><strong>Similarity to poisonous plants</strong></p> <p>The leaves of A. ursinum are easily mistaken for lily of the valley, sometimes also those of Colchicum autumnale and Arum maculatum. All three are poisonous. Grinding the leaves between the fingers and checking for a garlic-like smell can be helpful, but if the smell remains on the hands, one can easily mistake a subsequent poisonous plant for bear garlic. When the leaves of A. ursinum and Arum maculatum first sprout, they look similar but unfolded Arum maculatum leaves have irregular edges and many deep veins, while ramsons leaves are convex with a single main vein. The leaves of lily of the valley are paired, dull green and come from a single reddish-purple stem, while the leaves of A. ursinum emerge individually and are bright green.</p> <h3><strong>Sowing:</strong></h3> <p>Sow in late winter/late spring and late summer/autumn. The seeds need moist loamy soil with a damp shady environment. Sow either in situ or in a cold frame. It takes 200 seeds per square meter.</p> <h3><strong>Sowing Indoors:</strong></h3> <p>Wild Garlic sets seed profusely and germinates well. Plants should be large enough for planting out by the third year.</p> <h3><strong>Sowing Direct:</strong></h3> <p>Scatter the seed on bare soil under trees. Lightly roll the soil but do not rake over. Seeds can be sown at a rate of up to 200 seeds per square meter.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 15 (10 S)
Wild Garlic, Bear's Garlic Seeds (Allium ursinum) 3 - 1
Kamus Leek Seeds – Allium Porrum

4000 Seeds Kamus Leek...

Price €9.95 (SKU: MHS 148 (10g))
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>4000 Seeds Kamus Leek (Allium Porrum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 4000 (10g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <div>Leek, which is in the same family as onions and garlic, has a similar taste to the other familiar vegetables in this family. Usually used as a fundamental ingredient in soups and broths; this tasty vegetable adds a wonderful oniony, earthy taste to any hearty meal.</div> <div> <p>This is a very resilient plant, and can withstand winter weather easily, until they are ready to be harvested.</p> <p class="">From sowing these seeds, until full maturity, normally takes approximately 4 months, with germination taking 2-3 weeks.<br><br></p> </div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round&nbsp;</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">+16 / +25°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-3 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <div></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <div id="idTab5" class="block_hidden_only_for_screen"> <p class="align_center">No customer comments for the moment.</p> <p class="align_center">Only registered users can post a new comment.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 148 (10g)
Kamus Leek Seeds – Allium Porrum

Giant plant (with giant fruits)

Coming Soon
Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs 4.5 - 8

Giant leek Allium Sensation...

Price €5.95 (SKU: F 83 GAB)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs</strong></span><br /><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>The price is for package of 3 bulbs.</strong></span></h2> <div><span style="font-size:11pt;">These flowers are absolutely huge! They measure a whopping 6 - 8" wide! This variety of Allium makes an excellent dried flower. They are also a favorite of bees.</span></div> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;"><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Allium giganteum, also known as Giant Onion, is a perennial bulbous plant of the onion genus, used as a flowering garden plant, and growing to 2 metres. It is the tallest ornamental Allium in common cultivation. In early to midsummer, small globes of intense purple flower heads (umbels) appear, followed by attractive seed heads. A popular cultivar, 'Globemaster', is shorter (80 centimetres (31 in)) but produces much bigger, deep violet, flower heads (15–20 centimetres (5.9–7.9 in)). Both varieties have been granted the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">NAME: Giant Allium ‘Globemaster’</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">SCIENTIFIC NAME: Allium Giganteum</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">COLOR: Purple 6 - 8” round flower heads</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT SEEDS: Outdoors after frost / Indoors weeks before last frost</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">BLOOM TIME: Late Spring - Mid Summer</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">HARDINESS ZONE: 4 - 9</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT HEIGHT: 36 - 48”</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">PLANT SPACING: 12 - 15”</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">LIGHT REQUIREMENTS: Sun</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">SOIL &amp; WATER PREFERENCES: Average</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Always use sterilized planting soil.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Moisten planting media, place the fine seeds on the soil and cover them lightly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Stratify the seeds by placing the pot in a plastic bag at approx. 5°C.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">After 3-4 weeks place the pot to germination temperature, approx. 15°C.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt;">Within 1-? months the seeds will germinate, germination can be very slow.</span></p>
F 83 GAB
Giant leek Allium Sensation Mix - bulbs 4.5 - 8
Leek Seeds “Elefant” (Allium Porrum)

Leek Seeds “Elefant”...

Price €1.95 (SKU: MHS 149)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Leek Seeds “Elefant” (Allium Porrum)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 300 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Hardy and reliable, long thick tasty shanks. A good over-winter variety with excellent flavour. The more soil that is drawn up around the plant, the longer the white shank will be. Good source of vitamin C, iron and folate.</p> <p><strong>S<span>ow &amp; Grow</span></strong></p> <p><span>Outdoors: sow thinly March-April, in a seed bed, 1.5cm (½") deep, directly into finely-prepared, well-cultivated, fertile soil, which has already been watered. Seedlings usually appear in 14-28 days. Water well until plants are established. Transplant, 15cm (6") apart, into 15cm (6") deep holes made with a dibber. Allow 30cm (1') between rows. Water seedlings, but do not fill holes with soil. Or sow indoors, January-February, 0.5cm (¼") deep, in a tray of compost. Water well and place in a cold frame or unheated greenhouse. Keep moist. Transplant 5cm (2") apart to other trays, when large enough to handle. Gradually accustom young plants to outside conditions (avoid frosts) before planting out, May-July, into well-cultivated, fertile soil. Harvest: October-March.</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 149 (300 S)
Leek Seeds “Elefant” (Allium Porrum)
Kamus Leek Seeds – Allium Porrum

Kamus Leek Seeds – Allium...

Price €1.75 (SKU: MHS 148)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Kamus Leek Seeds – Allium Porrum</strong></h2> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 320 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>Leek, which is in the same family as onions and garlic, has a similar taste to the other familiar vegetables in this family. Usually used as a fundamental ingredient in soups and broths; this tasty vegetable adds a wonderful oniony, earthy taste to any hearty meal.</div> <div> <p>This is a very resilient plant and can withstand winter weather easily until they are ready to be harvested. <br><br>From sowing these seeds, until full maturity, normally takes approximately 4 months, with germination taking 2-3 weeks.</p> <p></p> </div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round&nbsp;</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">+16 / +25°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-3 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <div></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <div id="idTab5" class="block_hidden_only_for_screen"> <p class="align_center">No customer comments for the moment.</p> <p class="align_center">Only registered users can post a new comment.</p> </div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 148 (1g)
Kamus Leek Seeds – Allium Porrum

Variety from Serbia
Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar

Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar

Price €1.70 (SKU: MHS 150)
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5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 100 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Kupusinski jabučar is old Serbian variety, and one of the favorite old varieties The fruit bulb is apple-shaped (hence the name Kupusinski jabučar), with a solid, well-closed neck. Sheath leaves are dark yellow in color. This variety can be stored for a long time, without to lose taste.</p> <p>"Kupusinski jabučar" translated to English "Apple Onion aus Kupusina" (Kupusina is Village in Serbia).</p> <p>The medium-hot variety is grown successfully from seeds. The average mass of the fruit bulb is 80-120 g. </p> <p>The dry matter content is 12-14%. It yields about 300 mc/ha.</p> <p> <script type="text/javascript"></script> </p>
MHS 150 (100 S)
Onion Seeds Kupusinski Jabucar

Giant plant (with giant fruits)

Variety from Russia

Variety from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Variety from Serbia

Variety from Greece

Variety from Italy

Coming Soon
Become our seed supplier Seeds Gallery - 1

Become our seed supplier

Price €0.00 (SKU: )
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Become our seed supplier</strong></h2> <h2><strong>What does it take to become our seed supplier?</strong></h2> <p>In order to become our supplier, you need to have a video and pictures of the fruits of the plants you offer us, with your personal details and a date on paper that will be clearly visible (with your name and email address you use for PayPal).</p> <p>If it is a vegetable (tomato, pepper, cucumber ...) you need to know the exact name of the variety, because if you use any other name and we cannot find the information on the internet, then we are not interested in those seeds.</p> <p>You will need to send us a smaller amount of seed (20) so that we can perform seed germination testing. After that, we can arrange a further purchase of the seed from you.</p> <p>We make payments exclusively through PayPal (there is no other payment option).</p> </body> </html>
Become our seed supplier Seeds Gallery - 1

Variety from Spain
Spanish Roja Garlic

Spanish Roja Garlic

Price €2.35 (SKU: P 416 SRG)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Spanish Roja Garlic Cloves</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for 10 Garlic cloves</strong></span></h2> <p>Spanish Roja garlic is medium in size, averaging 5-7 centimeters in diameter with 8 to 9 cloves bound in a single layer around the scape. The outer wrappers are white, flaky, thin and peel easily. The inner clove wrappers range from tan to violet-blushed and encapsulate large ivory cloves that have a subtly sweet, hot, and robust flavor that lingers for a long time. When cooked, Spanish Roja garlic develops a deep, rich, and complex flavor.</p> <p>Spanish Roja garlic, botanically classified as Allium sativum var. ophioscorodon, is a rocambole, which is the most common hard neck variety. Also known as Greek or Greek Blue garlic, Spanish Roja garlic is sometimes difficult to find, but is sought after for its superior flavor and is consistently ranked high in tastings among garlic connoisseurs and growers.</p> <p>Spanish Roja garlic is an excellent source of vitamin B6, vitamin C, and manganese. It is also known for its allicin content which has anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties.</p> <p>Spanish Roja garlic can be used in both raw and cooked dishes. It is assertive and hot when raw so use sparingly. Chopping coarsely, mincing, and pureeing will release more of its oils providing a sharper flavor than slicing or leaving it whole. A popular raw method is to crush or mix the garlic with olive oil and lemon or with vinegar to create a vegetable and salad dressing. It can also be mixed with butter and brushed on to freshly cooked corn as a rich summer dish. For cooked applications, roast or sauté Spanish Roja garlic for a multidimensional and richer flavor experience. Complimentary pairings for Spanish Roja garlic include acidic fruits and vegetables, fresh herbs, cream, robust cheeses, olive oil, soy sauce, starchy pasta, grilled steak, roasted meats, and seafood. Spanish Roja garlic will keep up to five months when stored unpeeled in a cool and dry place.</p> <p>Spanish Roja is listed on Slow Food USA's Ark of Taste, a catalog of important heirloom foods that works to raise awareness of their existence and encourage others to produce them. Spanish Roja is not endangered nor at risk, a common characteristic of items listed on the Ark of Taste, but it is listed because it is only produced on a small scale and is often overlooked. Spanish Roja is difficult to produce on a large scale due to its demand by hand-harvesting procedures and short shelf life. This prevents it from being distributed to large commercial retailers and centralizes it to remaining specialty garlic.</p> <p>Spanish Roja garlic is an heirloom variety that is believed to have originated in Spain. Spanish Roja would eventually travel to the New World and become a true heirloom variety of North America. It was first cultivated in northwest Oregon in the late 1800s and then spread to Washington and other areas of the Pacific Northwest. Today, Spanish Roja is available in small quantities in home gardens and farmers' markets in the United States.</p> </body> </html>
P 416 SRG
Spanish Roja Garlic

Variety from Hungary
Purple Onion Seeds Tetenyi...

Purple Onion Seeds Tetenyi...

Price €1.75 (SKU: MHS 151)
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5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Purple Onion Seeds Tetenyi Rubin</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 50 seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>High-yielding, medium-fruited (130-140 days) red onions with very good yield. The spherical neck is well closed. The skin is dark purple, the flesh is moderately loose, the taste is pleasant and slightly spicy. Use for fresh onions, salads.</p> <p>The onion has good moisture tolerance and can, therefore, survive cool and wet summers without any problems.</p> <p>Plant 15 cm apart, 2 cm below surface Harvest when tops die off. The crop can be stored in a cool dry place, or diced and frozen. Perennial zones 3-9. </p>
MHS 151 (50 S)
Purple Onion Seeds Tetenyi Rubin

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Society Garlic Seeds...

Society Garlic Seeds...

Price €1.95 (SKU: MHS 85)
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5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Society Garlic Seeds (Tulbaghia violacea)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for a Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Tulbaghia violacea</b></i>, also known as<span> </span><b>society garlic</b>, is a<span> </span>species<span> </span>of<span> </span>flowering plant<span> </span>in the<span> </span>family<span> </span>Amaryllidaceae,<span> </span>indigenous<span> </span>to southern Africa (KwaZulu-Natal<span> </span>and<span> </span>Cape Province), and reportedly naturalized in Tanzania and Mexico.<sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>Growing to 60 cm (24 in) tall by 25 cm (10 in) wide, it is a clump-forming<span> </span>perennial<span> </span>with narrow leaves and large clusters of fragrant, violet flowers from midsummer to autumn (fall).</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p>When grown as an ornamental, this plant requires some protection from winter frosts. This species<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>and the<span> </span>cultivars<span> </span>‘Purple Eye’<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup><span> </span>and ‘Silver Lace’, with cream-margined leaves,<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup><span> </span>have all gained the<span> </span>Royal Horticultural Society’s<span> </span>Award of Garden Merit.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Medicinal_uses">Medicinal uses</span></h2> <p><i>Tulbaghia violacea</i><span> </span>is used locally as a herbal remedy/medicine to treat several ailments. Recently it was demonstrated to have<span> </span>androgenic<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>and anti-cancer<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>properties in vitro.</p> <p><i>Tulbaghia violacea</i><span> </span>exhibited<span> </span>antithrombotic<span> </span>activities which were higher than those found in<span> </span>garlic.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Odor">Odor</span></h2> <p>It may smell like marijuana or skunk to those familiar with either smell.<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>There have been instances in which concerned neighbors have contacted the authorities about the smell of cannabis in the neighborhood only to find out that the culprit was actually lemon verbena or society garlic.</p>
MHS 85 (10 S)
Society Garlic Seeds (Tulbaghia violacea)
Shallot Long French Onion...

Shallot Long French Onion...

Price €1.95 (SKU: MHS 152)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Shallot Long French Onion Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for package with 100 (0,35 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>An excellent, slightly elongated shallot, with copper-colored skins and great tasting pink-tinged flesh. Each bulb yields 8-20 bulbs at harvest. Plant from mid-January onwards. RHS Award of Garden Merit winner.</p> <p>Grown in Brittany, in the heart of France’s main shallot growing region, these superb certified varieties are of superior quality and will produce an outstanding crop for you.</p> <p><span><span>Hardiness:</span></span><span><span>-5 degrees</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Height:</span></span><span><span>31-40cm</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Spread:</span></span><span><span>11-20cm</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>RHS Award of Garden Merit: </span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Beds &amp; Borders: </span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Prefers Full Sun: </span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <h1 class="title style-scope ytd-video-primary-info-renderer"><a href="https://youtu.be/GGEb4C2bb9s" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Harvesting Shallots &amp; Potatoes &amp; Leeks</a></h1> <h2><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></h2> <p>The <b>shallot</b> is a type of onion, specifically a botanical variety of the species <i>Allium cepa</i>.</p> <p>The shallot was formerly classified as a separate species, <i>A. ascalonicum</i>, a name now considered a synonym of the currently accepted name.</p> <p>Its close relatives include the garlic, leek, chive, and Chinese onion.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Names">Names</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"> <div class="thumbcaption">Shallots are called "small onions" in South India and are used extensively in cooking there.</div> </div> </div> <p>Shallots probably originated in Central or Southwest Asia, travelling from there to India and the eastern Mediterranean. The name "shallot" comes from Ashkelon, an ancient Canaanite city,<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup> where people in classical Greek times believed shallots originated.<sup id="cite_ref-Field_Guide_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <p>The name <i>shallot</i> is also used for the Persian shallot <i>(A. stipitatum)</i>, from the Zagros Mountains in Iran and Iraq. The term <i>shallot</i> is further used for the French red shallot (<i>Allium cepa</i> var. <i>aggregatum</i>, or the <i>A. cepa</i> Aggregatum Group) and the French gray shallot or griselle (<i>Allium oschaninii</i>), a species referred to as "true shallot";<sup id="cite_ref-Field_Guide_6-1" class="reference">[6]</sup> it grows wild from Central to Southwest Asia. The name <i>shallot</i> is also used for a scallion in New Orleans and among English-speaking people in Quebec while the term <i>French shallot</i> refers to the plant referred to on this page.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup> Anglophone Quebecers and British English speakers stress the second syllable of <i>shallot</i>.</p> <p>The term <i>eschalot</i>, derived from the French word <i>échalote</i>, can also be used to refer to the shallot.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description_and_cultivation">Description and cultivation</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/A._cepa_var._aggregatum_conreu.JPG/150px-A._cepa_var._aggregatum_conreu.JPG" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallot plant (<i>A. cepa var. aggregatum</i>) growing in Castelltallat, Spain</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9c/2005onion_and_shallot.PNG/150px-2005onion_and_shallot.PNG" width="150" height="66" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Onion and shallot output in 2005</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e2/Shallot_whole_plant.jpg/220px-Shallot_whole_plant.jpg" width="220" height="60" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Whole shallot plants, consist of roots, bulbs, leaves, stalks, and flowers</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Shallot_seeds.png/150px-Shallot_seeds.png" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallot seeds</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fe/Shallot_%28Sambar_Onion%29_%281%29.JPG/150px-Shallot_%28Sambar_Onion%29_%281%29.JPG" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallots on sale in India</div> </div> </div> <p>Like garlic, shallots are formed in clusters of offsets with a head composed of multiple cloves. The skin colour of shallots can vary from golden brown to gray to rose red, and their off-white flesh is usually tinged with green or magenta.</p> <p>Shallots are extensively cultivated for culinary uses, propagated by offsets. In some regions ("long-season areas"), the offsets are usually planted in autumn (September or October in the Northern Hemisphere).<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[9]</sup> In some other regions, the suggested planting time for the principal crop is early spring (typically in February or the beginning of March in the Northern Hemisphere).</p> <p>In planting, the tops of the bulbs should be kept a little above ground, and the soil surrounding the bulbs is often drawn away when the roots have taken hold. They come to maturity in summer, although fresh shallots can now be found year-round in supermarkets. Shallots should not be planted on ground recently manured.</p> <p>In Africa, shallots are grown in the area around Anloga in southeastern Ghana.</p> <p>Shallots suffer damage from leek moth larvae, which mine into the leaves or bulbs of the plant.</p> <p></p> </body> </html>
MHS 152 (100 S)
Shallot Long French Onion Seeds
Shallot Rossa lunga di...

Shallot Rossa lunga di...

Price €1.95 (SKU: MHS 153)
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Shallot Rossa lunga di Firenze Onion Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for package with 100 (0,34 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>An excellent, slightly elongated shallot, with copper-colored skins and great tasting pink-tinged flesh. Each bulb yields 8-20 bulbs at harvest. Plant from mid-January onwards. RHS Award of Garden Merit winner.</p> <p>Grown in Brittany, in the heart of France’s main shallot growing region, these superb certified varieties are of superior quality and will produce an outstanding crop for you.</p> <p><span><span>Hardiness:</span></span><span><span>-5 degrees</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Height:</span></span><span><span>31-40cm</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Spread:</span></span><span><span>11-20cm</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>RHS Award of Garden Merit: </span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Beds &amp; Borders: </span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>Prefers Full Sun: </span></span><span><span>True</span></span></span></p> <h1 class="title style-scope ytd-video-primary-info-renderer"><a href="https://youtu.be/GGEb4C2bb9s" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Harvesting Shallots &amp; Potatoes &amp; Leeks</a></h1> <h2><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></h2> <p>The <b>shallot</b> is a type of onion, specifically a botanical variety of the species <i>Allium cepa</i>.</p> <p>The shallot was formerly classified as a separate species, <i>A. ascalonicum</i>, a name now considered a synonym of the currently accepted name.</p> <p>Its close relatives include the garlic, leek, chive, and Chinese onion.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Names">Names</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"> <div class="thumbcaption">Shallots are called "small onions" in South India and are used extensively in cooking there.</div> </div> </div> <p>Shallots probably originated in Central or Southwest Asia, travelling from there to India and the eastern Mediterranean. The name "shallot" comes from Ashkelon, an ancient Canaanite city,<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup> where people in classical Greek times believed shallots originated.<sup id="cite_ref-Field_Guide_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <p>The name <i>shallot</i> is also used for the Persian shallot <i>(A. stipitatum)</i>, from the Zagros Mountains in Iran and Iraq. The term <i>shallot</i> is further used for the French red shallot (<i>Allium cepa</i> var. <i>aggregatum</i>, or the <i>A. cepa</i> Aggregatum Group) and the French gray shallot or griselle (<i>Allium oschaninii</i>), a species referred to as "true shallot";<sup id="cite_ref-Field_Guide_6-1" class="reference">[6]</sup> it grows wild from Central to Southwest Asia. The name <i>shallot</i> is also used for a scallion in New Orleans and among English-speaking people in Quebec while the term <i>French shallot</i> refers to the plant referred to on this page.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup> Anglophone Quebecers and British English speakers stress the second syllable of <i>shallot</i>.</p> <p>The term <i>eschalot</i>, derived from the French word <i>échalote</i>, can also be used to refer to the shallot.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description_and_cultivation">Description and cultivation</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a4/A._cepa_var._aggregatum_conreu.JPG/150px-A._cepa_var._aggregatum_conreu.JPG" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallot plant (<i>A. cepa var. aggregatum</i>) growing in Castelltallat, Spain</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9c/2005onion_and_shallot.PNG/150px-2005onion_and_shallot.PNG" width="150" height="66" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Onion and shallot output in 2005</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e2/Shallot_whole_plant.jpg/220px-Shallot_whole_plant.jpg" width="220" height="60" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Whole shallot plants, consist of roots, bulbs, leaves, stalks, and flowers</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Shallot_seeds.png/150px-Shallot_seeds.png" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallot seeds</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fe/Shallot_%28Sambar_Onion%29_%281%29.JPG/150px-Shallot_%28Sambar_Onion%29_%281%29.JPG" width="150" height="113" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Shallots on sale in India</div> </div> </div> <p>Like garlic, shallots are formed in clusters of offsets with a head composed of multiple cloves. The skin colour of shallots can vary from golden brown to gray to rose red, and their off-white flesh is usually tinged with green or magenta.</p> <p>Shallots are extensively cultivated for culinary uses, propagated by offsets. In some regions ("long-season areas"), the offsets are usually planted in autumn (September or October in the Northern Hemisphere).<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference">[9]</sup> In some other regions, the suggested planting time for the principal crop is early spring (typically in February or the beginning of March in the Northern Hemisphere).</p> <p>In planting, the tops of the bulbs should be kept a little above ground, and the soil surrounding the bulbs is often drawn away when the roots have taken hold. They come to maturity in summer, although fresh shallots can now be found year-round in supermarkets. Shallots should not be planted on ground recently manured.</p> <p>In Africa, shallots are grown in the area around Anloga in southeastern Ghana.</p> <p>Shallots suffer damage from leek moth larvae, which mine into the leaves or bulbs of the plant.</p> <p></p>
MHS 153 (100 S)
Shallot Rossa lunga di Firenze Onion Seeds

Variety from Italy
Borettana Onion Seeds

Borettana Onion Seeds

Price €1.75 (SKU: MHS 107)
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Borettana Onion Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 125 (0.5 g) seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Borettana onion seeds are an heirloom variety originating around the town of Boretto in northern Italy. This is a small yellow storage onion with a unique flat top and squat, flattish, cipollini shape. Borettana will store for up to 5 months, and they braid well for attractive market displays. The flavour is strong and a little bit hot. The above ground tops are robust, and the skins are thick, allowing for good curing and drying for winter storage. Take time to cure these onions, and they should last in storage for months after harvest, remaining firm and flavourful.</span></p> <p>Plant 15 cm apart, 2 cm below surface Harvest when tops die off. The crop can be stored in a cool dry place, or diced and frozen. Perennial zones 3-9. </p>
MHS 107 (120 S)
Borettana Onion Seeds

Variety from Italy
Onion Seeds - Barletta...

Onion Seeds - Barletta...

Price €1.75 (SKU: MHS 154)
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Onion Seeds - Barletta Silverskin</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 50 seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Barletta Silverskin Onion produces small pure white silver-skinned onion that grows quickly for early cropping. Its mild flavor and firm texture make it ideal for all kinds of fresh use, cooking, salads, or pickling. Also great in a cream sauce for your holiday table.</p> <header class="page-header"> <div class="section-title"> <h1 class="page-title">How to grow onions and leeks</h1> </div> </header> <section class="section"> <div class="container container-small"> <div data-content-region="page_above_content"></div> <article class="page-content cms-page"> <p><span><strong>Onions</strong></span></p> <p><span>Italian onions are long-day onions. That means that they do best at higher latitudes (above 37 degrees or so — north of a line from southern Virginia to San Francisco).  While you can direct seed in the early spring, you will get the largest bulbs if you grow your own onion seedlings.  However, some varieties have done very well from direct seeding in our trial gardens.  Follow these simple techniques for perfect Italian onions.</span></p> <p><span><strong>For Transplants:</strong>  </span><span> Start your seedlings 10-12 weeks before the time you plan to set them out.  You can set them out in the early spring about two or three weeks before the last frost date.</span></p> <p><span>To start your seedlings, put a growing mix (either store-bought or homemade from 1/2 finely sifted peat, 1/2 finely sifted compost, and 1/2 handful of lime per bushel of mix) about 4 inches deep in a flat.  Wet mixture thoroughly.  Put your onion seed on top trying to space the seeds about 1/4 to 1/2 inch apart.  Cover with 1/4 inch soil mix or preferably vermiculite.  Water again &amp; set seeds in a warm place.  As soon as they germinate, get them under grow lights.  You can begin to feed them a week or so after they have germinated. </span></p> <p><span>You want them to have plenty of space, so pull and discard any seedlings that are more than about 1/2 inch from the next one.  Allow keeping growing.  If they begin to get too tall, you can give them a 'haircut' with scissors.  Just snip off the top inch or two of the seedlings.  They will do fine.</span></p> <p><span>About a week to ten days before you plan to set them out, begin to harden them off by putting them outside in a sheltered place for a few hours.  Increase the time every day.  </span></p> <p><span>To plant out, have a well-dug bed with good fertility.  Onions benefit from the soil with high phosphorus content.  Plant them about three inches apart in rows set about 10 inches apart.  Keep well watered throughout the growing season.  Onions benefit from good fertile soil, so give your crop several side dressings.</span></p> <p><span><strong>GROWING YOUR OWN ONION SETS. </strong></span><span>This is really easy and makes life easier next spring.  Sow your seed for onion sets about three-four months before your expected hard frost.  Prepare a nice bed.  Add some good compost or 10-10-10 if you do not have any.  Rake well.  Scatter your onion seeds and try and get them about 1/4 inch apart.  Firm them down by hand and cover with 1/4 inch soil.  Keep well watered until they germinate and provide supplemental irrigation.  Just let them grow.  The tops will die back about the time the first frost is due.  After the first good frost, pull your onions, which should be about the size of a marble.  Store them in a cool dry place for a few weeks until they dry well.  Don't wash off any dirt.  Once well dried, pack them in mesh bags (save your old store-bought onion bags).  Don't put too many in a bag;  try about one pound per bad so that there is good air circulation.  Store over the winter in a cool dry place.</span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><strong>GROWING ONION FROM SEEDS.  </strong></span><span> In the north, direct seed in a well-prepared bed about four weeks before the last frost date.  Try and get your onion seeds at least an inch apart.  You can either leave them on the surface or cover them with 1/4 inch or so of soil (better).  Onions should germinate in two weeks or so, perhaps earlier depending on the weather.  Keep them well watered.  </span></p> <p><span>Once they have germinated and grown to three or four inches, you can begin to start thinning them out.  Leave at least an inch between onions.  Pull any weeds.  Weeds will be the biggest problem you have grown from seed.  </span></p> <p><span>Barletta onions will be ready in early July, just in time to have them with the last of the spring peas.  Other onions will be ready in August and September.</span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><strong>LEEKS</strong> </span></p> <p><span>Grow your seedlings just like onions.  The only difference is planting out.  Make a trench about four inches deep with your hoe.  Plant the leeks inside the trench.  As the leeks grow, push soil into the trench up against the leek.  When you run out of the trench, begin to mound up soil against the leeks.  You want at least six inches of the plant buried under the soil.  This is what is going to give you that nice white root.  Begin harvesting after the first frost.  Most leeks are incredibly cold hardy.  In zones 7 on up, you can just leave them.  Further North, cover them with some mulch (leaves, straw, etc) before the first hard freeze and you can harvest them all winter.</span></p> </article> </div> </section>
MHS 154 (50 S)
Onion Seeds - Barletta Silverskin

Giant plant (with giant fruits)

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Goliath Giant Onion Seeds

Goliath Giant Onion Seeds

Price €1.95 (SKU: MHS 155)
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Goliath Giant Onion Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for a Package of 20 seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>A highly productive variety that can be grown from seed. Its breeding time is long. Its bulbs grow very large, so they require a more growing area. The taste is pleasantly sweet, not pungent.</p> <p>It has a low dry matter content, a spherical onion, and light brown skin. It is suitable for fresh consumption and for making salads, it cannot be stored for a long time.</p> <header class="page-header"> <div class="section-title"> <h2 class="page-title"><strong>How to grow onions and leeks</strong></h2> <h1 class="page-title"><strong style="font-size: 14px;">Onions</strong></h1> <p class="page-title">Italian onions are long-day onions. That means that they do best at higher latitudes (above 37 degrees or so — north of a line from southern Virginia to San Francisco).  While you can direct seed in the early spring, you will get the largest bulbs if you grow your own onion seedlings.  However, some varieties have done very well from direct seeding in our trial gardens.  Follow these simple techniques for perfect Italian onions.</p> </div> </header> <section class="section"> <div class="container container-small"> <article class="page-content cms-page"> <p><span><strong>For Transplants:</strong>  </span><span> Start your seedlings 10-12 weeks before the time you plan to set them out.  You can set them out in the early spring about two or three weeks before the last frost date.</span></p> <p><span>To start your seedlings, put a growing mix (either store-bought or homemade from 1/2 finely sifted peat, 1/2 finely sifted compost, and 1/2 handful of lime per bushel of mix) about 4 inches deep in a flat.  Wet mixture thoroughly.  Put your onion seed on top trying to space the seeds about 1/4 to 1/2 inch apart.  Cover with 1/4 inch soil mix or preferably vermiculite.  Water again &amp; set seeds in a warm place.  As soon as they germinate, get them under grow lights.  You can begin to feed them a week or so after they have germinated. </span></p> <p><span>You want them to have plenty of space, so pull and discard any seedlings that are more than about 1/2 inch from the next one.  Allow keeping growing.  If they begin to get too tall, you can give them a 'haircut' with scissors.  Just snip off the top inch or two of the seedlings.  They will do fine.</span></p> <p><span>About a week to ten days before you plan to set them out, begin to harden them off by putting them outside in a sheltered place for a few hours.  Increase the time every day.  </span></p> <p><span>To plant out, have a well-dug bed with good fertility.  Onions benefit from the soil with high phosphorus content.  Plant them about three inches apart in rows set about 10 inches apart.  Keep well watered throughout the growing season.  Onions benefit from good fertile soil, so give your crop several side dressings.</span></p> <p><span><strong>GROWING YOUR OWN ONION SETS. </strong></span><span>This is really easy and makes life easier next spring.  Sow your seed for onion sets about three-four months before your expected hard frost.  Prepare a nice bed.  Add some good compost or 10-10-10 if you do not have any.  Rake well.  Scatter your onion seeds and try and get them about 1/4 inch apart.  Firm them down by hand and cover with 1/4 inch soil.  Keep well watered until they germinate and provide supplemental irrigation.  Just let them grow.  The tops will die back about the time the first frost is due.  After the first good frost, pull your onions, which should be about the size of a marble.  Store them in a cool dry place for a few weeks until they dry well.  Don't wash off any dirt.  Once well dried, pack them in mesh bags (save your old store-bought onion bags).  Don't put too many in a bag;  try about one pound per bad so that there is good air circulation.  Store over the winter in a cool dry place.</span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><strong>GROWING ONION FROM SEEDS.  </strong></span><span> In the north, direct seed in a well-prepared bed about four weeks before the last frost date.  Try and get your onion seeds at least an inch apart.  You can either leave them on the surface or cover them with 1/4 inch or so of soil (better).  Onions should germinate in two weeks or so, perhaps earlier depending on the weather.  Keep them well watered.  </span></p> <p><span>Once they have germinated and grown to three or four inches, you can begin to start thinning them out.  Leave at least an inch between onions.  Pull any weeds.  Weeds will be the biggest problem you have grown from seed.  </span></p> <p><span>Barletta onions will be ready in early July, just in time to have them with the last of the spring peas.  Other onions will be ready in August and September.</span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><strong>LEEKS</strong> </span></p> <p><span>Grow your seedlings just like onions.  The only difference is planting out.  Make a trench about four inches deep with your hoe.  Plant the leeks inside the trench.  As the leeks grow, push soil into the trench up against the leek.  When you run out of the trench, begin to mound up soil against the leeks.  You want at least six inches of the plant buried under the soil.  This is what is going to give you that nice white root.  Begin harvesting after the first frost.  Most leeks are incredibly cold hardy.  In zones 7 on up, you can just leave them.  Further North, cover them with some mulch (leaves, straw, etc) before the first hard freeze and you can harvest them all winter.</span></p> </article> </div> </section>
MHS 155 (20 S)
Goliath Giant Onion Seeds