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Variety from United States of America
White Skin - White Flesh KENNEBEC Potato Seeds  - 4

White Skin - White Flesh...

Price €1.95 (SKU: P 247 WK)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>White Skin - White Flesh KENNEBEC Potato Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>These white-skinned and white flesh tubers make excellent table potatoes. The fairly firm texture when boiled. They are highly recommended for fries and chips. Plants are compact and erect with pointed smooth leaves and; numerous big white flowers with slight reddish-purple tinge on backs.</p> <p>Potatoes can be grown from true seeds just as easily and reliably as tomatoes, peppers or eggplants. True potato seed is a new development offering the advantages of, lower cost than mini-tubers, completely disease-free, and always available at the right planting time for gardeners in any region. This is the new wave in potato culture.</p> <p>Start indoors in seedling trays. Fill each cell to 1cm (1/2") from the top with sterilized seed starting mix. Moisten with water and place one seed on the top of the soil per cell. Cover with vermiculite and water in. Note: Potato seeds require light to germinate, so do not bury.  Optimal soil temperature for germination: 15-27°C (65-80°F). Seeds should germinate in 6-10 days.</p> <p><strong>Starting</strong><br />Keep the soil evenly moist during germination, but allow free drainage so that excess water does not collect. Water before mid-day to allow foliage to dry completely by nightfall. Potato seedlings <span>tend to stay prostrate immediately after emergence if they have 13 or more hours of daylight. As a somewhat longer stem is desired to ease transplanting, keep seedlings in about 12-hour light per day. During the last week expose seedlings to full sunlight to strengthen the stem. At optimal temperature, transplants will be ready 4 to 6 weeks after seeding.</span></p> <p><span>If field conditions are very different from indoor conditions, allow one week of hardening off. Water the plugs heavily the day before and day of the transplant, and transplant into moist soil.</span></p> <p><strong>Growing</strong><br />Ideal pH: 5.0-6.0. Plant seedlings so that only the crown of its top, 2-5cm (1-2“) is above soil level, burying the whole plug and a good part of the stem of the seedling. Seedlings cannot be completely buried, the growing point needs to stay above ground. Space seedlings 10-25cm (4-10") apart in rows 75cm (30") apart. Wider spacing produces fewer, but larger tubers. Keep the area well-watered for several weeks after transplant.</p> <p><strong>Hilling<br /></strong><span>When seedlings reach 10-15cm  (4-6") in height, they should be hilled, probably three weeks after transplanting. This operation takes soil from the centre of the row, and covers the seedlings up to half of their height, creating a small hill. It is best to work from the centre of the furrow towards the plants. Do not cut too deep into the soil near the plant to avoid root damage. Just before hilling, fertilizer can be applied near the base of the seedlings, and this will be covered when hilling.</span></p> <p>A second hilling and side dressing of balanced organic fertilizer should follow 3-4 weeks after the first, again depositing soil up to half the height of the plants. Again, increase the depth of the furrow in its centre and bring this soil on top of the small hill created in the first hilling operation.</p> <p><strong>Harvest</strong></p> <p><span>In the garden, potatoes can be harvested without destroying the plant if only a few potatoes are needed. Carefully scrape soil near the base of the stem until the skin of a potato is found, and pull it from the stolon. Consume it that day for a tasty and nutritious meal. </span>If potatoes need to be stored for some time, remove the foliage 3 weeks before harvest. This "sets" (hardens) the skin, and it will store better as the thicker skin will reduce water loss from the tubers. Keep them dark up to 2 to 3 months at high humidity before eating.</p> <p><strong>Seed Info</strong><br />In optimal conditions, at least 75% of the seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 3 years. Per 100′ row: 200 seeds, per acre: 8.8M seeds.</p> <p><strong>Diseases &amp; Pests</strong><br />Protect from cabbage moths and other insect pests with floating row cover. Prevent disease with a strict 4-year crop rotation, avoiding planting Brassicas in the same spot more than once every four years.</p> <p><strong>Companion Planting</strong><br />A worthy companion for beets, Brassicas, cucumbers, and onions. Avoid planting near peppers, pole beans, strawberries, and tomatoes.</p>
P 247 WK
White Skin - White Flesh KENNEBEC Potato Seeds  - 4

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Jicama - Mexican Yam Bean Seeds (Pachyrhizus erosus)

Jicama - Mexican Yam Bean...

Price €3.25 (SKU: VE 173)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Jicama - Mexican Yam Bean Seeds (Pachyrhizus erosus)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Pachyrhizus erosus, commonly known as jicama (/ˈhɪkəmə/ or /dʒɪˈkɑːmə/[1]; Spanish jícama About this sound [ˈxikama] (help·info); from Nahuatl xīcamatl, [ʃiːˈkamatɬ]), Mexican yam bean, or Mexican turnip, is the name of a native Mexican vine, although the name most commonly refers to the plant's edible tuberous root. Jícama is a species in the genus Pachyrhizus in the bean family (Fabaceae). Plants in this genus are commonly referred to as yam bean, although the term "yam bean" can be another name for jícama. The other major species of yam beans are also indigenous within the Americas.</span></p> <p><span>Flowers, either blue or white, and pods similar to lima beans, are produced on fully developed plants. Several species of jicama occur, but the one found in many markets is Pachyrhizus erosus. The two cultivated forms of P. erosus are jicama de agua and jicama de leche: both named for the consistency of their juice. The leche form has an elongated root and milky juice while the agua form has a top-shaped to oblate root, a more watery translucent juice, and is the preferred form for market.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Botany</span></strong></p> <p><span>Other names for jicama include Mexican potato, ahipa, saa got, and Chinese potato. In Ecuador and Peru, the name jicama is used for the unrelated yacón or Peruvian ground apple, a plant of the sunflower family whose tubers are also used as food.</span></p> <p><span>The jícama vine can reach a height of 4–5 m given suitable support. Its root can attain lengths of up to 2 m and weigh up to 20 kg. The heaviest jícama root ever recorded weighed 23 kg and was found in 2010 in the Philippines (where they are called singkamas).[4] Jicama is frost-tender and requires 9 months without frost for a good harvest of large tubers or to grow it commercially. It is worth growing in cooler areas that have at least five months without frost, as it will still produce tubers, but they will be smaller. Warm, temperate areas with at least five months without frost can start seed 8 to 10 weeks before the last spring frost. Bottom heat is recommended, as the seeds require warm temperatures to germinate, so the pots will need to be kept in a warm place. Jicama is unsuitable for areas with a short growing season unless cultured in a greenhouse. Growers in tropical areas can sow seed at any time of the year. Those in subtropical areas should sow seed once the soil has warmed in the spring.</span></p> <p><strong><span>In cooking</span></strong></p> <p><span>The root's exterior is yellow and papery, while its inside is creamy white with a crisp texture that resembles raw potato or pear. The flavor is sweet and starchy, reminiscent of some apples or raw green beans, and it is usually eaten raw, sometimes with salt, lemon, or lime juice, alguashte, and chili powder. It is also cooked in soups and stir-fried dishes. Jícama is often paired with chili powder, cilantro, ginger, lemon, lime, orange, red onion, salsa, sesame oil, grilled fish, and soy sauce.[6] It can be cut into thin wedges and dipped in salsa. In Mexico, it is popular in salads, fresh fruit combinations, fruit bars, soups, and other cooked dishes. In contrast to the root, the remainder of the jícama plant is very poisonous; the seeds contain the toxin rotenone, which is used to poison insects and fish.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Spread to Asia</span></strong></p> <p><span>Spaniards spread cultivation of jícama from Mexico to the Philippines (where it is known as singkamas, from Nahuatl xicamatl),[8] from there it went to China and other parts of Southeast Asia, where notable uses of raw jícama include popiah, fresh lumpia in the Philippines and salads in Indonesia, Singapore and Malaysia such as yusheng and rojak.</span></p> <p><span>In the Philippines, jícama is usually eaten fresh with condiments such as rice vinegar and sprinkled with salt, or with bagoong (shrimp paste). In Malay, it is known by the name ubi sengkuang. In Indonesia, jícama is known as bengkuang. This root crop is also known by people in Sumatra and Java[citation needed], and eaten at fresh fruit bars or mixed in the rojak (a kind of spicy fruit salad). Padang a city in West Sumatra is called "the city of bengkuang". Local people might have thought that this jícama is the "indigenous crop" of Padang. The crop has been grown everywhere in this city and it has become a part of their culture.[9]</span></p> <p><span>It is known by its Chinese name bang kuang to the ethnic Chinese in Southeast Asia. In Mandarin Chinese, it is known as dòushǔ(豆薯) or liáng shǔ (涼薯), as sa1 got3 沙葛 (same as "turnip") in Yue Chinese/Cantonese, and as mang-guang 芒光 in Teochew, where the word is borrowed from the Malay, and as dìguā 地瓜 in Guizhou province and several neighboring provinces of China, the latter term being shared with sweet potatoes. Jícama has become popular in Vietnamese food as an ingredient in pie, where it is called cây củ đậu (in northern Vietnam) or củ sắn or sắn nước (in southern Vietnam).</span></p> <p><span>In Japanese, it is known as 葛芋 (kuzu-imo). In Myanmar, it is called </span><span>စိမ်းစားဥ</span><span> (Sane-saar-u). Its Thai name is </span><span>มันแกว</span><span> (man kaeo).[10] In Cambodia, it is known as </span><span>ដំឡូងរលួស</span><span> /dɑmlɔoŋ rəluəh/ or under its Chinese name as </span><span>ប៉ិកួៈ</span><span> ~ </span><span>ប៉ិគក់</span><span> /peʔkŭəʔ/.[11] In Bengali, it is known as shankhalu (</span><span>শাঁখ</span><span>আলু</span><span>), literally translating to "conch (shankha, </span><span>শাঁখ</span><span>) potato (alu, </span><span>আলু</span><span>)" for its shape, size and colour. In Hindi, it is known as mishrikand (</span><span>मिश्रीकंद</span><span>). It is eaten during fast (</span><span>उपवास</span><span>) in Bihar (India) and is known as kesaur (</span><span>केसौर</span><span>). In Odia, it is known as (</span><span>ଶଙ୍ଖ</span><span>ସାରୁ</span><span>) Shankha Saru. In Laos, it is called man phao (</span><span>ມັນເພົາ</span><span>),[12] smaller and tastes a little sweeter than the Mexican type. It is used as a snack by peeling off the outer layer of the skin, then cutting into bite sizes for eating like an apple or a pear.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Nutrition</span></strong></p> <p><span>Jícama is high in carbohydrates in the form of dietary fiber. It is composed of 86–90% water; it contains only trace amounts of protein and lipids. Its sweet flavor comes from the oligofructose inulin (also called fructo-oligosaccharide) which is a prebiotic. Jícama is very low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium. It is also a good source of vitamin C.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Storage</span></strong></p> <p><span>Jícama should be stored dry, between 12 and 16 °C (53 and 60 °F). As colder temperatures will damage the roots, jicama should not be refrigerated. A fresh root stored at an appropriate temperature will keep for a month or two.</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> </body> </html>
VE 173 (5 S)
Jicama - Mexican Yam Bean Seeds (Pachyrhizus erosus)
Eggplant Golden Eggs Seeds (Solanum melongena) 1.85 - 1

Eggplant Golden Eggs Seeds...

Price €1.85 (SKU: VE 106)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Eggplant Golden Eggs Seeds (Solanum melongena)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 25 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>An unusual beautiful ornamental pot plant and/or annual, Golden Eggs' is sure to draw a lot of attention. This easy-to-grow plant reaches 12-20 inches tall and produces purple flowers and egg-shaped, non-edible, non-poisonous fruit. The fruit change from white to yellow and remain on the plant for weeks under proper environmental conditions.</p> <p>'Golden Eggs' thrives in a warm to a hot environment and does best in full sun. Can be grown outside as an annual in a warm sunny sheltered location, but best in a conservatory/outside for the summer. Plants can be pinched, pruned or sheared depending on how they are used, including pot plants, large tubs or containers.</p> <div><span style="font-size: 12pt;"> <span style="color: #0000ff;"><strong><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NLJ-1bvhxM&amp;feature=youtu.be" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="color: #0000ff;">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NLJ-1bvhxM&amp;feature=youtu.be</span></a></strong></span></span></div> <div>·         Sow thinly in good quality well drained seed compost, covering thinly and keeping moist at 65-70F.</div> <div>·         Germination in 7-14 days.</div> <div>·         Transplant seedlings to individual pots after 6-10 weeks</div> <div>·         Golden Eggs' is a moderate feeder and should be fertilized at every other watering.</div> <div>·         Prune as required to keep in shape.</div>
VE 106 (10 S)
Eggplant Golden Eggs Seeds (Solanum melongena) 1.85 - 1

Coming Soon
Turkish Orange Eggplant...

Turkish Orange Eggplant...

Price €1.95 (SKU: VE 96)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Turkish Orange Eggplant Seeds (Solanum aethiopicum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i><b>Solanum aethiopicum</b></i>, the<span> </span><b>bitter tomato</b>,<span> </span><b>Ethiopian eggplant</b>, or<span> </span><b>nakati</b>, is a fruiting<span> </span>plant<span> </span>of the<span> </span>genus<span> </span><i>Solanum</i><span> </span>mainly found in<span> </span>Asia<span> </span>and Tropical<span> </span>Africa. It is also known as<span> </span><b>Ethiopian nightshade</b>,<span> </span><b>garden eggs</b>, and<span> </span><b>mock tomato</b>. It is a popular vegetable in north-east India, and is known as<span> </span><b>khamen akhaba</b><span> </span>in Manipuri and<span> </span><i>samtawk</i><span> </span>in<span> </span>Mizo. They are called<span> </span><i>Titay bii</i><span> </span>or simply<span> </span><i>bii</i><span> </span>in Darjeeling, Sikkim and Nepal and are relished with meat, particularly pork. These names are a result of its varied morphology, with ripe fruit often looking like a cross between an<span> </span>eggplant<span> </span>and a<span> </span>tomato, which are also from<span> </span><i>Solanum</i>. In fact, the Ethiopian eggplant was so much confused with the ordinary eggplant that this was considered by some a<span> </span>variety<span> </span><i>violaceum</i><span> </span>of<span> </span><i>S. aethiopicum</i>.</p> <p>Ethiopian eggplant may have originated from the domestication of<span> </span><i>Solanum anguivi</i>. The<span> </span><b>scarlet eggplant</b>, also known as Gilo or<span> </span><i>jiló</i>, was long held to be a distinct species (<i>S. gilo</i>) but is nowadays generally considered to be a<span> </span>cultivar<span> </span>group of<span> </span><i>S. aethiopicum</i>.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <p>The leaves of<span> </span><i>Solanum aethiopicum</i><span> </span>are eaten as a<span> </span>leaf vegetable<span> </span>and are actually more nutritious than the<span> </span>fruit.</p> <p>The highly variable fruit of the plant is eaten both raw and cooked and is becoming more popular as a cultivated crop. These fruits are usually harvested while still green, before the skin becomes thick. The bitterness depends on the levels of<span> </span>saponin<span> </span>it contains, some with a sweet flavor and others very bitter. When the berries mature, they turn bright red because of high<span> </span>carotene<span> </span>content.</p> <p><i>Solanum aethiopicum</i><span> </span>is used as an ornamental in Asia.</p> <p>In Nigeria, Igbo people use it as a substitute for kolanut especially for those who do not want to chew kolanut. In which case it is used to welcome guests at home or before resumption of a traditional ceremony.</p> <p>Garden egg as it is commonly known in Nigeria is sometimes used to make a tomato based sauce which can be used to eat yam</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h3> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Solanum_aethiopicum_MS_2264.JPG/220px-Solanum_aethiopicum_MS_2264.JPG" width="220" height="147" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Fruit of<span> </span><i>S. aethiopicum</i><span> </span>from SW Burkina Faso</div> </div> </div> <p>Currently there is a large movement towards increased cultivation of<span> </span><i>Solanum aethiopicum</i><span> </span>in West Africa. It grows all year long and can produce high fruit yields. However, low germination rates are an obstacle to wider cultivation.</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e8/Bitter_tomato_raw.jpg/220px-Bitter_tomato_raw.jpg" width="220" height="293" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Fruits of bitter tomato ready for cooking in northeast India</div> </div> </div> <p>The only place where<span> </span><i>S. aethiopicum</i><span> </span>is grown to a significant extent in Europe lies in South Italy, to be precise in<span> </span>Rotonda<span> </span>in the<span> </span>Basilicata, where this plant is of some commercial importance. Probably it was introduced by veterans returning from East Africa after the colonial war in the late 19th century.</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f3/Chicken-Bitter-Tomato.jpg/220px-Chicken-Bitter-Tomato.jpg" width="220" height="215" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Chicken cooked with bitter tomato in northeast India</div> </div> </div> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Selected_cultivars">Selected cultivars</span></h3> <ul> <li>'Turkish Orange' or 'Turkish Italian'</li> </ul> <dl> <dd>The fruits of this variety are about two inches in diameter and turn bright orange-red when ripe, although they are usually eaten when still green. The sweet taste is often used in<span> </span>Thai curry. It can produce fruit within just 75 days after planting.</dd> </dl> <ul> <li>'Sweet Red'</li> </ul> <dl> <dd>These striped fruits, just 1 inch in diameter, have a strong but non-bitter flavor. The plant is thornless and grows up to 3 feet tall and can produce fruit 125 days after planting.</dd> </dl> <ul> <li>'Small Ruffled Red', 'Red Ruffles', or 'Hmong Red'</li> </ul> <dl> <dd>The two-inch berries of the 'Hmong Red' have deep creases and a bitter flavor used in Southeast Asian cooking. It can produce fruit 100 days after planting.</dd> </dl>
VE 96 (10 S)
Turkish Orange Eggplant Seeds (Solanum aethiopicum)

Variety from Italy
Italian Aubergine - Long Purple Seeds

Italian Aubergine - Long...

Price €1.95 (SKU: VE 189)
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5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <div class="rte"> <h2><strong>Italian Aubergine - Long Purple Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for a Package of 20 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>A medium early variety producing high yields of smooth, long and dark cylindral fruit around 20cm long.  It has compact flesh with very few seeds that makes this variety withstand most handling and is easy to peel.  Best matured in an unheated greenhouse, but will crop reasonably in a warm sunny, sheltered spot outdoors.</p> <p> </p> <p>Days To Germination: 10 to 20 days</p> <p> Optimum Soil Temp. For Germination: 70 to 80F</p> <p>Days To Harvest: 80 days</p> <p>Planting Depth: 1/4inch</p> <p>Spacing, Plant: 20 to 30 inches</p> <p>Light:  Sunny Location / under glass</p> <p> </p> <p>Sow in 2 seeds per pot in early spring covering lightly with fine soil, and ensure a minimum temp of 70F until germinated.</p> <p>When 3 –4 inches high plant to growing position, (ground / 9in pot or 3 per grow bag), best under glass.</p> <p>These will not tolerate cold conditions.</p> <p>Provide support and keep pest free.</p> <p>To aid fruit development, add potassium rich fertilizer with each watering when fruit has set.</p> <p>To encourage further production, pick before the fruit surface shine fades.</p> </div>
VE 189 (20 S)
Italian Aubergine - Long Purple Seeds
Thai Long Green Eggplant Seeds  - 2

Thai Long Green Eggplant Seeds

Price €2.25 (SKU: VE 93 LE)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Thai Long Green Eggplant Seeds (Solanum melongena)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#fd0202;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Thai Long Green Eggplant is the name for several varieties of eggplant used in Southeast Asian cuisines, most often of the eggplant species Solanum melongena. They are also cultivated in Sri Lanka and feature in Sri Lankan cuisine. These Long Green Eggplants are commonly used in Thai cuisine. Some of the cultivars in Thailand are Thai Purple, Thai Green, Thai Yellow, and Thai White.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>The green variety of Thai eggplants are essential ingredients in Thai curry dishes such as in kaeng tai pla, green and red curry. They are often halved or quartered, but can also be used whole, and cooked in the curry sauce where they become softer and absorb the flavor of the sauce. They are also eaten raw in Thai salads or with Thai chili pastes (nam phrik).</p> <p>Sometimes, in Thai restaurants outside of Thailand, Thai eggplants are replaced by locally available eggplants.</p>
VE 93 LE (10 S)
Thai Long Green Eggplant Seeds  - 2

Giant plant (with giant fruits)

Variety from Russia

Variety from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Variety from Serbia

Variety from Greece

Variety from Italy

Coming Soon
Become our seed supplier Seeds Gallery - 1

Become our seed supplier

Price €0.00 (SKU: )
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Become our seed supplier</strong></h2> <h2><strong>What does it take to become our seed supplier?</strong></h2> <p>In order to become our supplier, you need to have a video and pictures of the fruits of the plants you offer us, with your personal details and a date on paper that will be clearly visible (with your name and email address you use for PayPal).</p> <p>If it is a vegetable (tomato, pepper, cucumber ...) you need to know the exact name of the variety, because if you use any other name and we cannot find the information on the internet, then we are not interested in those seeds.</p> <p>You will need to send us a smaller amount of seed (20) so that we can perform seed germination testing. After that, we can arrange a further purchase of the seed from you.</p> <p>We make payments exclusively through PayPal (there is no other payment option).</p> </body> </html>
Become our seed supplier Seeds Gallery - 1
Yellow Tamarillo Seeds...

Yellow Tamarillo Seeds...

Price €2.15 (SKU: V 159)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Yellow Tamarillo Seeds (Golden Tamarillo)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>It is still hard to find Yellow tamarillo seeds. Yellow tamarillo fruit is egg-shaped with a glossy tangerine hued skin and succulent flesh containing small soft edible seeds. The skin is thin and tannin-rich for palatable human consumption. Its flesh when is ripe is bright and piquant in flavor with a pleasantly sweet aroma.</p> <p>The Golden tamarillo, botanical name Cyphomandra betacea, is also known as the tree tomato, is a member of the Solanaceae family which includes tomatoes, potatoes, tobacco, and pepper plants.</p> <h2><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></h2> <div><span>The </span><b>tamarillo</b><span> is a small tree or </span>shrub<span> in the </span>flowering plant<span> family </span>Solanaceae<span> (the nightshade family). It is best known as the species that bears the </span><b>tamarillo</b><span>, an egg-shaped edible </span>fruit<span>.</span><span> It is also known as the </span><b>tree<span> </span>tomato</b><span>,</span><span> </span><b>tomate andino</b><span>, </span><b>tomate serrano</b><span>, </span><b>tomate de<span> </span>yuca</b><span>, </span><b>sachatomate</b><span>, </span><b>berenjena</b><span>, </span><b>tamamoro</b><span>, and </span><b>tomate de árbol</b><span> in South America.</span></div> <div></div> <div> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Plant_origin_and_regions_of_cultivation">Plant origin and regions of cultivation</span></h3> <p>The tamarillo is native to the Andes of Ecuador, Colombia, Peru, Chile, and Bolivia. Today it is still cultivated in gardens and small orchards for local production,<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-0" class="reference">[4]</sup> and it is one of the most popular fruits in these regions.<sup id="cite_ref-economicBotany_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup> Other regions of cultivation are the subtropical areas throughout the world, such as Rwanda, South Africa, Darjeeling, and Sikkim in India, Nepal, Hong Kong, China, the United States, Australia, Bhutan, and New Zealand.</p> <p>The first internationally marketed crop of tamarillos in Australia was produced around 1996, although permaculture and exotic fruit enthusiasts had increasingly grown the fruit around the country from the mid-1970s on.</p> <p>In New Zealand, about 2,000 tons are produced on 200 hectares of land and exported to the United States, Japan, and Europe. For the export, the existing marketing channels developed for the kiwifruit are used.</p> <p>The tamarillo is also successfully grown at higher elevations of Malaysia and the Philippines, and in Puerto Rico. In the hot tropical lowlands, it develops only small fruits and fruit setting is seldom.</p> <p>Prior to 1967, the tamarillo was known as the "tree<span> </span>tomato" in New Zealand, but a new name was chosen by the New Zealand Tree<span> </span>Tomato<span> </span>Promotions Council in order to distinguish it from the ordinary garden tomatoand increase its exotic appeal.</p> </div> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Plant">Plant</span></h3> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/Cyphomandra_betacea1.jpg/220px-Cyphomandra_betacea1.jpg" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" data-pagespeed-url-hash="2010095046" onload="pagespeed.CriticalImages.checkImageForCriticality(this);" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Flower cluster</div> </div> </div> <p>The plant is a fast-growing tree that grows up to 5 meters. Peak production is reached after 4 years,<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-1" class="reference">[6]</sup> and the life expectancy is about 12 years.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-3" class="reference">[4]</sup> The tree usually forms a single upright trunk with lateral branches. The flowers and fruits hang from the lateral branches. The leaves are large, simple and perennial, and have a strong pungent smell.<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-2" class="reference">[6]</sup> The flowers are pink-white and form clusters of 10 to 50 flowers. They produce 1 to 6 fruits per cluster. Plants can set fruit without cross-pollination, but the flowers are fragrant and attract insects. Cross-pollination seems to improve fruit set.<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-3" class="reference">[6]</sup> The roots are shallow and not very pronounced, therefore the plant is not tolerant of drought stress and can be damaged by strong winds. Tamarillos will hybridize with many other<span> </span>Solanaceae, though the hybrid fruits will be sterile, and unpalatable in some instances.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Fruit">Fruit</span></h3> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9a/Solanum_betaceum_unripe_fruits.jpg/220px-Solanum_betaceum_unripe_fruits.jpg" width="220" height="146" class="thumbimage" data-pagespeed-url-hash="2489475574" onload="pagespeed.CriticalImages.checkImageForCriticality(this);" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Unripe fruits</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/00/Tamarillos%28janek2005%29.jpg/220px-Tamarillos%28janek2005%29.jpg" width="220" height="182" class="thumbimage" data-pagespeed-url-hash="1269263135" onload="pagespeed.CriticalImages.checkImageForCriticality(this);" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Ripe fruits</div> </div> </div> <p>The fruits are egg-shaped and about 4-10 centimeters long. Their color varies from yellow and orange to red and almost purple. Sometimes they have dark, longitudinal stripes. Red fruits are more acetous, yellow and orange fruits are sweeter. The flesh has a firm texture and contains more and larger seeds than a common tomato.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-4" class="reference">[4]</sup> The fruits are very high in vitamins and iron and low in calories (only about 40 calories per fruit).</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Soil_and_climate_requirements">Soil and climate requirements</span></h3> <p>The tamarillo prefers a subtropical climate, with rainfall between 600 and 4000 millimeters and annual temperatures between 15 and 20 °C.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-6" class="reference">[4]</sup> It is intolerant to frost (below -2 °C) and drought stress. It is assumed that the fruit set is affected by night temperatures. Areas, where citrus is cultivated, provide good conditions for tamarillos as well, such as in the Mediterranean climate. Tamarillo plants grow best in light, deep, fertile soils, although they are not very demanding. However, soils must be permeable since the plants are not tolerant of water-logging.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-7" class="reference">[4]</sup> They grow naturally on soils with a pH of 5 to 8.5.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Growth">Growth</span></h3> <p>Propagation is possible by both using seeds or cuttings.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-8" class="reference">[4]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup> Seedlings first develop a straight, about 1.5 to 1.8 meters tall trunk, before they branch out. Propagation by seeds is easy and ideal in protected environments. However, in orchards with different cultivars, cross-pollination will occur and the characteristics of the cultivars get mixed up. Seedlings should be kept in the nursery until they reach a height of 1 to 1.5 meters, as they are very frost-sensitive.</p> <p>Plants grown from cuttings branch out earlier and result in more shrub-like plants that are more suitable for exposed sites. Cuttings should be made from basal and aerial shoots and should be free of pathogenic viruses. Plants grown from cuttings should be kept in the nursery until they reach a height of 0.5 to 1 meter.</p> <p>The tree grows very quickly and is able to bear fruit after 1.5 to 2 years. The plant is daylength-insensitive. The fruits do not mature simultaneously unless the tree has been pruned. A single tree can produce more than 20 kg of fruit per year; an orchard yields in 15 to 17 tons per hectare.<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-5" class="reference">[6]</sup> One single mature tree in good soil will bear more fruit than a typical family can eat in about 3 months.</p> <p>Tamarillos are suitable for growing as indoor container plants, though their swift growth, their light, water, and humidity requirements, and their large leaves can pose a challenge to those with limited space.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Plant_management">Plant management</span></h3> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0a/Cyphomandra_betacea2.jpg/220px-Cyphomandra_betacea2.jpg" width="220" height="293" class="thumbimage" data-pagespeed-url-hash="353362248" onload="pagespeed.CriticalImages.checkImageForCriticality(this);" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Tamarillo tree</div> </div> </div> <p>The tamarillo trees are adaptable and very easy to grow. However, some plant management strategies can help to stabilize and improve plant performance.</p> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Planting">Planting</span></h4> <p>Planting distances depend on the growing system. In New Zealand, with mechanized production, single row planting distances of 1 to 1.5 meters between plants and 4.5 to 5 meters between rows are recommended. In traditional growing regions such as the Andean region, plantations are much denser, with 1.2 to 1.5 meters between plants. Dense planting can be a strategy to protect plants against the wind. On poorly drained soils, plants should be planted on ridges.</p> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Pruning">Pruning</span></h4> <p>Pruning can help to control fruit size, plant size, harvest date and to simplify the harvesting of fruits.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-10" class="reference">[4]</sup> Cutting the tip of young plants leads to the desired branch height. Once the tree shape has been formed, pruning is reduced to the removal of old or dead wood and previously fruited branches, since branches that have already carried fruits will produce smaller fruits with lower quality the next time. Light pruning leads to medium-sized, heavy pruning to large-sized fruits. Basal shoots should be removed. When plants are grown in greenhouses, pruning prevents excessive vegetative growth.</p> <p>When the tree is about 1 to 1.5 meters in height, it is advisable to cut the roots on one side and lean the tree to the other (in the direction of the midday sun at about 30 to 45 degrees). This allows fruiting branches to grow all along the trunk rather than just at the top.</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e3/Tamarillo_seedlings%2C_6_months_old.jpg/220px-Tamarillo_seedlings%2C_6_months_old.jpg" width="220" height="215" class="thumbimage" data-pagespeed-url-hash="1025451796" onload="pagespeed.CriticalImages.checkImageForCriticality(this);" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Tamarillo seedlings, 6 months old</div> </div> </div> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Mulching">Mulching</span></h4> <p>Since the plants are sensitive to drought stress, mulching can help to preserve moisture in the soil.<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-6" class="reference">[6]</sup> It can also be a strategy to suppress weeds, as other soil management techniques, such as plowing, are not possible due to the shallow and sensitive root system.</p> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Shelter">Shelter</span></h4> <p>The plants have to be protected from the wind. Their shallow root system does not provide enough stability, and the lateral branches are fragile and break easily when carrying fruits.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-11" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Irrigation_and_fertilization">Irrigation and fertilization</span></h4> <p>To maximize and stabilize production, water, and nutrient inputs should be provided when needed. The plants need a continuous supply of water due to their shallow root system. Drought stress results in a decrease in plant growth, fruit size, and productivity.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-12" class="reference">[4]</sup> Recommended fertilizer rates per hectare are 170 kg of Nitrogen, 45 kg of Phosphorus, and 130 to 190 kg of Potassium for intensive New Zealand production systems. Phosphorus and Potassium are applied at the beginning of the season, Nitrogen applications are distributed throughout the year.</p> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Pest_management">Pest management</span></h4> <p>The tamarillo tree is, compared to similar crops such as tomatoes, quite resistant to pests in general. Still, to reduce risk in intensive production systems, some pests have to be controlled to avoid major crop damage. To control pests, the same control methods as other Solanaceae can be used.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Harvest">Harvest</span></h3> <p>Ripening of fruits is not simultaneous. Several harvests are necessary.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup> In climates with little annual variation, tamarillo trees can flower and set fruit throughout the year. In climates with pronounced seasons (such as New Zealand), fruits ripen in autumn. Premature harvest and ethylene-induced ripening in controlled-atmosphere chambers are possible with minimal loss of fruit quality.<sup id="cite_ref-Ripening_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup> The fragile lateral branches can break easily when loaded with fruits, so premature harvest helps to reduce this risk and allows storage of fruits up to 20 days at room temperature. A cold-water dipping process, developed by the New Zealand Department of Scientific and Industrial Research also allows further storage of 6–10 weeks.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Usage">Usage</span></h2> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_use">Culinary use</span></h3> <p>The fruit is eaten by scooping the flesh from a halved fruit. When lightly sugared and cooled, the flesh is used for a breakfast dish. Some people in New Zealand cut the fruit in half, scoop out the pulpy flesh and spread it on toast at breakfast. Yellow-fruited cultivars have a sweeter flavor, occasionally compared to mango or apricot. The red-fruited variety, which is much more widely cultivated, is more tart, and the savory aftertaste is far more pronounced. In the Northern Hemisphere, tamarillos are most frequently available from July until November, and fruits early in the season tend to be sweeter and less astringent.</p> <p>They can be made into compotes, or added to stews (e.g. Boeuf Bourguignon), hollandaise, chutneys, and curries. Desserts using this fruit include bavarois and, combined with apples, a strudel.</p> <p>Tamarillos can be added as a secondary fermentation flavoring to Kombucha Tea for a tart and tangy taste. The fruit should be mashed and added at a ratio of 3 Tamarillos to 1 Litre of Kombucha, however, great care should be taken to not allow too much carbon dioxide gas to build up in sealed bottles during secondary fermentation. The sugar content of fresh Tamarillos added to Kombucha can generate rapid carbon dioxide production in secondary fermentation within just 48–72 hours.</p> <p>In Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, and parts of Indonesia (including Sumatra and Sulawesi), fresh tamarillos are frequently blended together with water and sugar to make a juice. It is also available as a commercially pasteurized purée.</p> <p>In Nepal, a version of the South American fruit is decently popular. It is typically consumed as a chutney or a pickle during the autumn and winter months. It is known as <i>Tammatar</i> and <i>Ram Bheda</i>. Similar to Nepal, the Indian regions of Ooty, Darjeeling, and Sikkim also consume Tamarillo.</p> <p>In Ecuador, the tamarillo, known as <i>tomate de árbol</i>, is blended with chili<span> </span>peppers<span> </span>to make a hot sauce commonly consumed with local dishes of the Andean region. The sauce is simply referred to as <i>aji</i> and is present at every meal in Ecuador.</p> <p>The flesh of the tamarillo is tangy and variably sweet, with a bold and complex flavor, and maybe compared to kiwifruit,<span> </span>tomato, guava, or passion fruit. The skin and the flesh near it have a bitter taste and are not usually eaten raw</p> <p>The tamarillo has been described as having a taste similar to that of a passion fruit and a piquant tomato combined.</p> <p>The red and purple types of fruits are preferred in import countries of Europe: Even though they taste more acidic, their color is favored by consumers.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Industrial_use">Industrial use</span></h3> <p>The fruits are high in pectin and therefore have good properties for preserves. However, they oxidize and lose color when not treated. Yellow fruit types are better suited for industrial use.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Prospects">Prospects</span></h2> <p>Research and breeding should improve plantation management, fruit quality, and postharvest treatment.<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-7" class="reference">[6]</sup> A better understanding of plant physiology, nutritional requirements of plants, and fruit set mechanisms will help to improve growing systems. Breeding goals are to break seed dormancy, to improve the sweetness of fruits, and to increase yield. For industrial uses, little "stones" of sodium and calcium that occasionally appear in the fruit skin form a problem. Those stones have to be eliminated by breeding.</p> </body> </html>
V 159 (5 S)
Yellow Tamarillo Seeds (Golden Tamarillo)

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Tamarillo Seeds...

Tamarillo Seeds...

Price €2.30 (SKU: V 113)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong><span style="color: #000000;">Tamarillo Seeds (Cyphomandra Betacea)</span></strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Cyphomandra betacea, also known as the tree tomato, or tamarillo, is a small evergreen and fast-growing tree, that originates from several regions of South America, including Peru and Chile. This small tree has large heart-shaped leaves, fragrant flowers that are borne into clusters, red edible fruits.</p> <p>The tomato tree is frost-hardy to 26°F to 28°F (-2°C to -3°C), and will best be grown in summer.</p> <p>Newly planted tamarillos should be pruned to a height of 3 to 4 ft. to encourage branching. Yearly pruning thereafter is advisable to eliminate branches that have already fruited and to induce ample new shoots close to the main branches, since fruit is produced on new growth. Pruning also aids in harvesting, and if timed properly can extend the total fruiting period.</p> <p>Hardiness Zone &nbsp;US 8-11 &nbsp; Aus 2-5&nbsp;</p> <div> <h2><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></h2> <div><span>The&nbsp;</span><b>tamarillo</b><span>&nbsp;is a small tree or&nbsp;</span>shrub<span>&nbsp;in the&nbsp;</span>flowering plant<span>&nbsp;family&nbsp;</span>Solanaceae<span>&nbsp;(the nightshade family). It is best known as the species that bears the&nbsp;</span><b>tamarillo</b><span>, an egg-shaped edible&nbsp;</span>fruit<span>.</span><sup id="cite_ref-tamarillocom_2-0" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;It is also known as the&nbsp;</span><b>tree tomato</b><span>,</span><sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference">[3]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span><b>tomate andino</b><span>,&nbsp;</span><b>tomate serrano</b><span>,&nbsp;</span><b>tomate de yuca</b><span>,&nbsp;</span><b>sachatomate</b><span>,&nbsp;</span><b>berenjena</b><span>,&nbsp;</span><b>tamamoro</b><span>, and&nbsp;</span><b>tomate de árbol</b><span>&nbsp;in South America.</span></div> <div></div> <div> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Plant_origin_and_regions_of_cultivation">Plant origin and regions of cultivation</span></h3> <p>The tamarillo is native to the&nbsp;Andes&nbsp;of&nbsp;Ecuador,&nbsp;Colombia,&nbsp;Peru,&nbsp;Chile, and&nbsp;Bolivia. Today it is still cultivated in&nbsp;gardens&nbsp;and small&nbsp;orchards&nbsp;for local production,<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-0" class="reference">[4]</sup>&nbsp;and it is one of the most popular fruits in these regions.<sup id="cite_ref-economicBotany_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup>&nbsp;Other regions of cultivation are the subtropical areas throughout the world, such as&nbsp;Rwanda,&nbsp;South Africa,&nbsp;Darjeeling&nbsp;and&nbsp;Sikkim&nbsp;in&nbsp;India,&nbsp;Nepal,&nbsp;Hong Kong,&nbsp;China, the&nbsp;United States,&nbsp;Australia,&nbsp;Bhutan&nbsp;and&nbsp;New Zealand.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-1" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <p>The first internationally marketed crop of tamarillos in Australia was produced around 1996, although permaculture and exotic fruit enthusiasts had increasingly grown the fruit around the country from the mid-1970s on.</p> <p>In New Zealand, about 2,000 tons are produced on 200 hectares of land and exported to the United States,&nbsp;Japan<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup>&nbsp;and&nbsp;Europe. For the export, the existing marketing channels developed for the&nbsp;kiwifruit&nbsp;are used.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-2" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <p>The tamarillo is also successfully grown at higher elevations of&nbsp;Malaysia&nbsp;and the&nbsp;Philippines, and in&nbsp;Puerto Rico.<sup id="cite_ref-economicBotany_5-1" class="reference">[5]</sup>&nbsp;In the hot tropical lowlands, it develops only small fruits and fruit setting is seldom.</p> <p>Prior to 1967, the tamarillo was known as the "tree tomato" in New Zealand, but a new name was chosen by the New Zealand Tree Tomato Promotions Council in order to distinguish it from the ordinary&nbsp;garden tomatoand increase its exotic appeal.</p> </div> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Plant">Plant</span></h3> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/31/Cyphomandra_betacea1.jpg/220px-Cyphomandra_betacea1.jpg" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Flower cluster</div> </div> </div> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The plant is a fast-growing&nbsp;tree&nbsp;that grows up to 5 meters. Peak production is reached after 4 years,<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-1" class="reference">[6]</sup>&nbsp;and the life expectancy is about 12 years.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-3" class="reference">[4]</sup>&nbsp;The tree usually forms a single upright&nbsp;trunk&nbsp;with lateral branches. The flowers and fruits hang from the lateral branches. The leaves are large,&nbsp;simple&nbsp;and&nbsp;perennial, and have a strong pungent smell.<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-2" class="reference">[6]</sup>&nbsp;The flowers are pink-white, and form clusters of 10 to 50 flowers. They produce 1 to 6 fruits per cluster. Plants can set fruit without cross-pollination, but the flowers are fragrant and attract insects.&nbsp;Cross-pollination&nbsp;seems to improve fruit set.<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-3" class="reference">[6]</sup>&nbsp;The roots are shallow and not very pronounced, therefore the plant is not tolerant of drought stress and can be damaged by strong winds. Tamarillos will hybridize with many other solanaceae, though the hybrid fruits will be sterile, and unpalatable in some instances.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Fruit">Fruit</span></h3> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9a/Solanum_betaceum_unripe_fruits.jpg/220px-Solanum_betaceum_unripe_fruits.jpg" width="220" height="146" class="thumbimage"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Unripe fruits</div> </div> </div> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/00/Tamarillos%28janek2005%29.jpg/220px-Tamarillos%28janek2005%29.jpg" width="220" height="182" class="thumbimage"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Ripe fruits</div> </div> </div> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The fruits are egg-shaped and about 4-10 centimeters long. Their color varies from yellow and orange to red and almost purple. Sometimes they have dark, longitudinal stripes. Red fruits are more&nbsp;acetous, yellow and orange fruits are sweeter. The flesh has a firm texture and contains more and larger seeds than a common&nbsp;tomato.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-4" class="reference">[4]</sup>&nbsp;The fruits are very high in&nbsp;vitamins&nbsp;and&nbsp;iron&nbsp;and low in&nbsp;calories&nbsp;(only about 40 calories per fruit).</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Soil_and_climate_requirements">Soil and climate requirements</span></h3> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The tamarillo prefers&nbsp;subtropical climate, with rainfall between 600 and 4000 millimeters and annual temperatures between 15 and 20&nbsp;°C.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-6" class="reference">[4]</sup>&nbsp;It is intolerant to&nbsp;frost&nbsp;(below -2&nbsp;°C) and drought stress. It is assumed that fruit set is affected by night temperatures. Areas where&nbsp;citrus&nbsp;are cultivated provide good conditions for tamarillos as well, such as in the&nbsp;Mediterranean climate. Tamarillo plants grow best in light, deep, fertile soils, although they are not very demanding. However, soils must be permeable since the plants are not tolerant to water-logging.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-7" class="reference">[4]</sup>&nbsp;They grow naturally on soils with a&nbsp;pH&nbsp;of 5 to 8.5.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Growth">Growth</span></h3> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>Propagation&nbsp;is possible by both using&nbsp;seeds&nbsp;or&nbsp;cuttings.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-8" class="reference">[4]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup>&nbsp;Seedlings&nbsp;first develop a straight, about 1.5 to 1.8 meters tall trunk, before they branch out.&nbsp;Propagation&nbsp;by&nbsp;seeds&nbsp;is easy and ideal in protected environments. However, in&nbsp;orchards&nbsp;with different&nbsp;cultivars,&nbsp;cross-pollination&nbsp;will occur and characteristics of the&nbsp;cultivars&nbsp;get mixed up.&nbsp;Seedlings&nbsp;should be kept in the&nbsp;nursery&nbsp;until they reach a height of 1 to 1.5 meters, as they are very frost-sensitive.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>Plants grown from&nbsp;cuttings&nbsp;branch out earlier and result in more&nbsp;shrub-like plants that are more suitable for exposed sites.&nbsp;Cuttings&nbsp;should be made from&nbsp;basal&nbsp;and aerial shoots, and should be free of&nbsp;pathogenic viruses. Plants grown from&nbsp;cuttings&nbsp;should be kept in the&nbsp;nursery&nbsp;until they reach a height of 0.5 to 1 meter.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The tree grows very quickly and is able to bear fruit after 1.5 to 2 years.<sup id="cite_ref-economicBotany_5-2" class="reference">[5]</sup>&nbsp;The plant is daylength-insensitive. The fruits do not mature simultaneously, unless the tree has been&nbsp;pruned. A single tree can produce more than 20&nbsp;kg of fruit per year; an&nbsp;orchard&nbsp;yields in 15 to 17 tons per hectare.<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-5" class="reference">[6]</sup>&nbsp;One single mature tree in good&nbsp;soil&nbsp;will bear more fruit than a typical family can eat in about 3 months.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>Tamarillos are suitable for growing as indoor container plants, though their swift growth, their light, water and humidity requirements and their large leaves can pose a challenge to those with limited space.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Plant_management">Plant management</span></h3> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0a/Cyphomandra_betacea2.jpg/220px-Cyphomandra_betacea2.jpg" width="220" height="293" class="thumbimage"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Tamarillo tree</div> </div> </div> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The tamarillo trees are adaptable and very easy to grow. However, some plant management strategies can help to stabilize and improve plant performance.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Planting">Planting</span></h4> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>Planting distances depend on the growing system. In New Zealand, with mechanized production, single row planting distances of 1 to 1.5 meters between plants and 4.5 to 5 meters between rows are recommended. In traditional growing regions such as the&nbsp;Andean region, plantations are much more dense, with 1.2 to 1.5 meters between plants. Dense planting can be a strategy to protect plants against wind.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-9" class="reference">[4]</sup>&nbsp;On poorly drained soils, plants should be planted on ridges.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Pruning">Pruning</span></h4> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>Pruning&nbsp;can help to control fruit size, plant size,&nbsp;harvest&nbsp;date and to simplify the&nbsp;harvesting&nbsp;of fruits.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-10" class="reference">[4]</sup>&nbsp;Cutting the tip of young plants leads to the desired branch height. Once the tree shape has been formed,&nbsp;pruning&nbsp;is reduced to the removal of old or dead wood and previously fruited branches, since branches that have already carried fruits will produce smaller fruits with lower quality the next time. Light&nbsp;pruning&nbsp;leads to medium-sized, heavy&nbsp;pruning&nbsp;to large sized fruits.&nbsp;Basal shoots&nbsp;should be removed. When plants are grown in&nbsp;greenhouses,&nbsp;pruning&nbsp;prevents excessive vegetative growth.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>When the tree is about 1 to 1.5 metres in height, it is advisable to cut the roots on one side and lean the tree to the other (in the direction of the midday sun at about 30 to 45 degrees). This allows fruiting branches to grow all along the trunk rather than just at the top.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e3/Tamarillo_seedlings%2C_6_months_old.jpg/220px-Tamarillo_seedlings%2C_6_months_old.jpg" width="220" height="215" class="thumbimage"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Tamarillo seedlings, 6 months old</div> </div> </div> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Mulching">Mulching</span></h4> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>Since the plants are sensitive to drought stress,&nbsp;mulching&nbsp;can help to preserve moisture in the soil.<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-6" class="reference">[6]</sup>&nbsp;It can also be a strategy to suppress weeds, as other soil management techniques, such as&nbsp;plowing, are not possible due to the shallow and sensitive root system.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Shelter">Shelter</span></h4> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The plants have to be protected from wind. Their shallow root system does not provide enough stability, and the lateral branches are fragile and break easily when carrying fruits.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-11" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Irrigation_and_fertilization">Irrigation and fertilization</span></h4> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>To maximize and stabilize production, water and&nbsp;nutrient&nbsp;inputs should be provided when needed. The plants need continuous supply of water due to their shallow root system. Drought stress results in a decrease of plant growth, fruit size and productivity.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-12" class="reference">[4]</sup>&nbsp;Recommended&nbsp;fertilizer&nbsp;rates per hectare are 170&nbsp;kg of&nbsp;Nitrogen, 45&nbsp;kg of&nbsp;Phosphorus&nbsp;and 130 to 190&nbsp;kg of&nbsp;Potassium&nbsp;for intensive&nbsp;New Zealand&nbsp;production systems.&nbsp;Phosphorus&nbsp;and&nbsp;Potassium&nbsp;are applied in the beginning of the season,&nbsp;Nitrogen&nbsp;applications are distributed throughout the year.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-13" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Pest_management">Pest management</span></h4> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The tamarillo tree is, compared to similar crops such as&nbsp;tomatoes, quite resistant to&nbsp;pests&nbsp;in general. Still, to reduce risk in intensive production systems, some&nbsp;pests&nbsp;have to be controlled to avoid major crop damage. To control pests, the same control methods as for other&nbsp;solanaceae&nbsp;can be used.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Harvest">Harvest</span></h3> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>Ripening&nbsp;of fruits is not simultaneous. Several harvests are necessary.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup>&nbsp;In climates with little annual variation, tamarillo trees can flower and set fruit throughout the year. In climates with pronounced&nbsp;seasons&nbsp;(such as&nbsp;New Zealand), fruits ripen in autumn. Premature harvest and&nbsp;ethylene&nbsp;induced&nbsp;ripening&nbsp;in controlled-atmosphere chambers is possible with minimal loss of fruit quality.<sup id="cite_ref-Ripening_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup>&nbsp;The fragile lateral branches can break easily when loaded with fruits, so premature harvest helps to reduce this risk and allows storage of fruits up to 20 days at room temperature. A cold-water dipping process, developed by the&nbsp;New Zealand Department of Scientific and Industrial Research&nbsp;also allows further storage of 6–10 weeks.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-14" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Usage">Usage</span></h2> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_use">Culinary use</span></h3> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The fruit is eaten by scooping the flesh from a halved fruit. When lightly&nbsp;sugared&nbsp;and cooled, the flesh is used for a breakfast dish. Some people in&nbsp;New Zealand&nbsp;cut the fruit in half, scoop out the pulpy flesh and spread it on toast at breakfast. Yellow-fruited cultivars have a sweeter flavor, occasionally compared to mango or apricot. The red-fruited variety, which is much more widely cultivated, is more tart, and the savory aftertaste is far more pronounced. In the Northern Hemisphere, tamarillos are most frequently available from July until November, and fruits early in the season tend to be sweeter and less astringent.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>They can be made into&nbsp;compotes, or added to stews (e.g.&nbsp;Boeuf Bourguignon),&nbsp;hollandaise,&nbsp;chutneys&nbsp;and&nbsp;curries. Desserts using this fruit include&nbsp;bavarois&nbsp;and, combined with apples, a&nbsp;strudel.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>Tamarillos can be added as a secondary fermentation flavouring to&nbsp;Kombucha&nbsp;Tea for a tart and tangy taste. The fruit should be mashed and added at a ratio of 3 Tamarillos to 1 Litre of Kombucha, however great care should be taken to not allow too much carbon dioxide gas to build up in sealed bottles during secondary fermentation. The sugar content of fresh Tamarillos added to Kombucha can generate a rapid carbon dioxide production in secondary fermentation within just 48–72 hours.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>In&nbsp;Colombia,&nbsp;Ecuador,&nbsp;Panama&nbsp;and parts of&nbsp;Indonesia&nbsp;(including&nbsp;Sumatra&nbsp;and&nbsp;Sulawesi), fresh tamarillos are frequently blended together with water and sugar to make a juice. It is also available as a commercially pasteurized&nbsp;purée.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>In Nepal, a version of the South American fruit is decently popular. It is typically consumed as a chutney or a pickle during the autumn and winter months. It is known as&nbsp;<i>Tammatar</i>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<i>Ram Bheda</i>. Similar to Nepal, the Indian regions of Ooty, Darjeeling and Sikkim also consume Tamarillo.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>In Ecuador, the tamarillo, known as&nbsp;<i>tomate de árbol</i>, is blended with chili peppers to make a hot sauce commonly consumed with local dishes of the Andean region. The sauce is simply referred to as&nbsp;<i>aji</i>&nbsp;and is present at every meal in Ecuador.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The flesh of the tamarillo is tangy and variably sweet, with a bold and complex flavor, and may be compared to&nbsp;kiwifruit, tomato,&nbsp;guava, or&nbsp;passion fruit. The skin and the flesh near it have a bitter taste and are not usually eaten raw</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The tamarillo has been described as having a taste similar to that of a&nbsp;passion fruit&nbsp;and a piquant&nbsp;tomato&nbsp;combined.<sup class="noprint Inline-Template Template-Fact">[<i><span title="This claim needs references to reliable sources. (January 2009)">citation needed</span></i>]</sup></p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The red and purple types of fruits are preferred in import countries of Europe: Even though they taste more acidic, their color is favoured by consumers.<sup id="cite_ref-SmallFruitsReview_4-15" class="reference">[4]</sup></p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Industrial_use">Industrial use</span></h3> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>The fruits are high in&nbsp;pectin&nbsp;and therefore have good properties for&nbsp;preserves. However, they&nbsp;oxidize&nbsp;and lose color when not treated. Yellow fruit types are better suited to industrial use.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Prospects">Prospects</span></h2> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong></strong></span></span> <p>Research and&nbsp;breeding&nbsp;should improve plantation management, fruit quality and&nbsp;postharvest&nbsp;treatment.<sup id="cite_ref-LostCrops_6-7" class="reference">[6]</sup>&nbsp;A better understanding of&nbsp;plant physiology, nutritional requirements of plants and fruit set mechanisms will help to improve growing systems. Breeding goals are to break&nbsp;seed dormancy, to improve sweetness of fruits and to increase yield. For industrial uses, little "stones" of&nbsp;sodium&nbsp;and&nbsp;calcium&nbsp;that occasionally appear in the fruit skin form a problem. Those stones have to be eliminated by&nbsp;breeding.</p> <span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong><br></strong></span></div> <div></div><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 113 (10 S)
Tamarillo Seeds (Cyphomandra Betacea)
Tomatillo Queen of...

Tomatillo Queen of...

Price €4.50 (SKU: VT 167)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Tomatillo Queen of Malinalco seeds (Phylasis ixocarpa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fe0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.&nbsp;</strong></span></h2> An old and very rare variety from the town of Malinalco in southwestern Mexico. The tomatillo is also known as Mexican husk tomato. It is not a tomato like a name suggests, but it is closely related to the pineapple cherry. Like other Tomatillos, the plant has a bushy habit and height of 180 - 200 cm.<br><br>The fruits of the tomatillo are surrounded by a thin Chinese lantern-shaped membrane. This membrane starts out green and turns brown, almost transparent when the fruits are ripe. These fruits ripen from green to light yellow. This tomatillo is larger and sweeter than other tomatillo varieties.&nbsp;<br><br>The taste is an exotic combination of sweet and sour. The shape of this Queen of Malinalco is round and elongated to tapered. The flesh is nice and sweet and juicy. Tomatillos can be used in salads, salsas, and exotic fruit desserts and are also made into compotes.<br><br>Furthermore, chili sauce (Salsa Verde) is made with tomatillos and chilies. Give this plant firm support. Harvesting is possible from August when the lantern becomes translucent and the berry turns yellow. Ripe fruits fall off the plant regularly. Nonhardy annual.&nbsp;<br><br>Sowing in March, transplanting from April at stable temperatures. Ready in a little over two months after transplantation, they are large in size. In particular, this variety is among the sweetest of the species, with an exceptional citrus aftertaste. <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 167 (5 S)
Tomatillo Queen of Malinalco seeds (Phylasis ixocarpa)