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Sun Jewel , Chamoe, Korean melon Seeds

Korean melon Seeds, Sun...

Regular price 1,95 € -15% Ár 1,66 € (SKU: V 228)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Sun Jewel , Chamoe, Korean melon Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#f60101;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Sun Jewel melon is oblong with gently blunted ends, averaging 18 centimeters in length. It has a buttery yellow skin with shallow white sutures that run end to end. The inner flesh is translucent white with a crisp yet juicy consistency. When ripe, the melon's flesh has subtly sweet aroma of bubblegum and pear offering a flavor that is a cross between cucumber and honeydew. The fruits are usually heavy between 250 and 400 grams. Though commonly served peeled, the melon is known to be completely edible from the seed to skin. It is highly perishable and is recommended to be eaten within one week of harvest.</p> <p><strong>Seasons/Availability</strong></p> <p>Sun Jewel melons are available in the late summer and fall.</p> <p><strong>Current Facts</strong></p> <p>The Sun Jewel melon is also known as Chamoe or simply Korean melon, which is a bit of a broad term but quite accurate since the melons are ubiquitous in Korea come summertime. Botanically a variety of Cucumis melo, the Sun Jewel is technically a sweet melon, but often treated more like its cousin the cucumber, as in savory dishes and pickling applications. It its homeland in Korea, an exhibition space showcases the history and cultivation of the Sun Jewel melon at the Korean Melon Ecology Center.</p> <p><strong>Nutritional Value</strong></p> <p>Sun Jewel melons are rich in vitamins A and C.</p> <p><strong>Applications</strong></p> <p>The Sun Jewel melon has a lower than average brix level (approximately 7 or 8) and slightly vegetal characteristic making it equally appropriate for savory and sweet dishes. They are most often simply served chilled, with the yellow rind peeled off, and the sweet seeds and pith intact. Chop and add to sweet or savory salads, serve atop desserts or with yogurt as a breakfast item. Pureed, it can be used to make smoothies, ice cream or other frozen desserts. Use under ripe fruits to make quick pickles or kimchee. Sun Jewel melon pairs well with cucumber, mint, ginger, citrus, berries, lychee, shrimp, coconut milk, feta cheese and chili powder. Once cut, refrigerate in a plastic bag or sealed container and consume within two to three days.</p> <p><strong>Ethnic/Cultural Info</strong></p> <p>In its native land of Korea, the Sun Jewel melon is made into a pickle known as chamoe jangajji. The fruit has adopted many aliases throughout the Asian countries in which it is enjoyed. In China, it is known as Huangjingua or Tian Gua, in Japan as Makuwa, in Korea as Chamoe and in Vietnam as Dura Gan.</p> <p><strong>Geography/History</strong></p> <p>Sun Jewel melons have been enjoyed in Korea for hundreds of years, with images of the fruits appearing on 12th century celadon from the Goryeo Dynasty. Originally, the melons were suspected to be a native of India, eventually making their way to China and subsequently Korea via the Silk Road. It is also thought that some green varieties, both with and without stripes, may have been a result of wild melons growing in ancient China. They are relatively drought tolerant plants if grown in moisture retentive soils.</p> <p> </p>
V 228 (5 S)
Sun Jewel , Chamoe, Korean melon Seeds
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Florinis Greece Sweet...

Florinis Greece Sweet...

Regular price 1,75 € -15% Ár 1,49 € (SKU: PP 26)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>"Florinis" Greece Sweet pepper Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 or 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Greece Traditional sweet red peppers (known in Greece as "Florinis"), an excellent sweet taste! Variety florin, length 23 - 28 cm and weight 200 g per fruit. In Greece, this pepper is prepared in various ways, from filling to salad and preservation. It's free to say that the table without this favorite pepper in Greek is unthinkable. Plants are fertile and highly resistant to disease.</p> <h2 class="elementor-heading-title elementor-size-default"><strong>Chalkidiki Olives stuffed with Florina pepper</strong></h2> <p><span>Strips of red fleshy sweet pepper, cut by hand to be filled in Chalkidiki green olives. It is the perfect dish for lovers of mild but slightly spicy, sweet and savory flavors. All these flavors together are present in olive of Chalkidiki, stuffed with red sweet pepper and can accompany each menu.</span></p> <h3><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></h3> <p>The<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Florina pepper</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(Greek:<span>&nbsp;</span><span lang="el" xml:lang="el">πιπεριά Φλωρίνης</span>) is a<span>&nbsp;</span>pepper<span>&nbsp;</span>cultivated in the northern Greek region of<span>&nbsp;</span>Western Macedonia<span>&nbsp;</span>and specifically in the wider area of<span>&nbsp;</span>Florina; for which it is named. It has a deep red color and is shaped like a cow's horn. Initially, the pepper has a green color,<span>&nbsp;</span>ripening<span>&nbsp;</span>into red, after the<span>&nbsp;</span>15th of August. The red pepper is known in<span>&nbsp;</span>Greece<span>&nbsp;</span>for its rich sweet flavor, used in various Greek dishes and is exported in various canned forms abroad, usually hand-stripped, keeping the natural scents of pepper and topped with extra virgin olive oil, salt, and vinegar.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="History">History</span></h2> <p>The seed was brought from<span>&nbsp;</span>Brazil<span>&nbsp;</span>to<span>&nbsp;</span>Western Macedonia<span>&nbsp;</span>in<span>&nbsp;</span>Greece<span>&nbsp;</span>in the 17th century and cultivated by the local<span>&nbsp;</span>Macedonian Greeks<span>&nbsp;</span>in<span>&nbsp;</span>Florina,<span>&nbsp;</span>Prespes,<span>&nbsp;</span>Veroia,<span>&nbsp;</span>Aridaia, and<span>&nbsp;</span>Kozani<span>&nbsp;</span>but only in Florina, its cultivation was successful, where it adapted to the Greek Macedonian climate and soil, and eventually, the other regions stopped cultivating the pepper, leaving Florina as its sole producer.<sup id="cite_ref-kathimerini_1-1" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The pepper belongs to the<span>&nbsp;</span>capsicum<span>&nbsp;</span>genus of the nightshade family<span>&nbsp;</span>Solanaceae.<sup id="cite_ref-test2_3-0" class="reference">[3]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Florina's red peppers were awarded the recognition of<span>&nbsp;</span>Protected Designation of Origin<span>&nbsp;</span>in 1994 by the<span>&nbsp;</span>World Trade Organization<span>&nbsp;</span>(WTO).<sup id="cite_ref-test14_4-0" class="reference">[4]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Every year during the last days of August, in a small local village in<span>&nbsp;</span>Aetos, Florina<span>&nbsp;</span>a feast of peppers is held, including celebrations with music bands and cooked recipes, based on peppers which are offered to all the guests.<sup id="cite_ref-test4_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p>High productivity and adaptation of the plant can be achieved in efficient draining soils, full sunny locations and low winds for the protection of its branch and root sensitivity.<sup id="cite_ref-test12_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>The most convenient temperatures for its growth are between 20° to 26°<span>&nbsp;</span>Celsius<span>&nbsp;</span>during the midday and 14° to 16° Celsius during the night.<sup id="cite_ref-test2_3-1" class="reference">[3]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Their harvest takes up to 18 weeks,<span>&nbsp;</span>ripening<span>&nbsp;</span>to maturity after mid-August.<sup id="cite_ref-kathimerini_1-2" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>A good quality, red pepper of Florina should be bright in color, thick, firm and sweet flavored. Its consumption should be avoided with the appearance of dullness, cracks or deterioration, which are factors of the<span>&nbsp;</span>vegetable<span>&nbsp;</span>reduction in quality.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cooking_and_recipes">Cooking and recipes</span></h2> <p>The red peppers of Florina are usually<span>&nbsp;</span>roasted<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>stuffed<span>&nbsp;</span>with different combinations of<span>&nbsp;</span>foods, as<span>&nbsp;</span>rice,<span>&nbsp;</span>meat,<span>&nbsp;</span>shrimps<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>feta cheese.<sup id="cite_ref-macsaveur_8-0" class="reference">[8]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>These<span>&nbsp;</span>sweet peppers<span>&nbsp;</span>are used in<span>&nbsp;</span>sauces,<span>&nbsp;</span>salads,<span>&nbsp;</span>pasta, meat recipes or mashed, creating a<span>&nbsp;</span>pâté<span>&nbsp;</span>with traditional recipes. They can also be<span>&nbsp;</span>dried,<span>&nbsp;</span>canned,<span>&nbsp;</span>frozen<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>pickled, usually<span>&nbsp;</span>garnishing<span>&nbsp;</span>Greek salads.<span>&nbsp;</span>They can be roasted, sliced and served as an appetizer, by adding<span>&nbsp;</span>olive oil,<span>&nbsp;</span>garlic<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>sea salt.<span>&nbsp;</span>A well-known traditional recipe in<span>&nbsp;</span>Greece<span>&nbsp;</span>with stuffed peppers is<span>&nbsp;</span>Gemista.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
PP 26 (10 S)
Florinis Greece Sweet pepper Seeds
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Peruból származó fajta
Purple Corn  Seeds - Maíz Morado "Kculli" Seeds Gallery - 6

Purple Corn Seeds - Maíz...

Regular price 2,25 € -15% Ár 1,91 € (SKU: VE 72)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Purple Corn - Maíz Morado "Kculli" - Purple Maize Seeds</strong> <strong>(Zea mays amylaceaa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #fd0101;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 4,5g (10), 9g (20) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Purple corn, a variety of Zea mays, is an Andean crop from low valleys locally called maiz Morado. Purple corn can be found mostly in Peru, where it is cultivated on the coast, as well as in lands almost ten thousand feet high. There are different varieties of purple corn, and all of them originated from an ancestral line called “Kculli”, still cultivated in Peru. The Kculli line is very old, and ancient objects in the shape of these particular ears of corn have been found in archeological sites at least 2,500 years old in places on the central coast, as well as among the ceramics of the “Mochica” culture.</p> <p>The kernels of purple corn are soaked in hot water by people of the Andes to yield a deep purple color for foods and beverages, a practice now recognized for its industrial uses as a colorant. Common in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru, purple corn is used in chicha Morada, a drink made by boiling ground purple corn kernels with pineapple, cinnamon, clove, and sugar, and in mazamorra, a type of pudding. One of the most popular purple corn food uses is the "Api", a smoothie served hot and sometimes called "Inca's dessert".</p> <p>Purple corn contains substantial amounts of phenolics and anthocyanins, among other phytochemicals. Its main colorant is cianidin-3-b-glucosa. People of the Andes make a refreshing drink from purple corn called "chicha Morada" which is now recognized as a nutritive powerhouse due to its phenolic content. Phenolics are known to have many bioactive and functional properties. Research shows that crops with the highest total phenolic and anthocyanin content also have the highest antioxidant activity.</p> <p>Anthocyaninins are a type of complex flavonoid that produce blue, purple or red colors.&nbsp;</p> <p>Purple Corn has a higher antioxidant capacity and antiradical kinetics than blueberries and higher or similar anthocyanin and phenolic contents.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 72 (4.5g)
Purple Corn  Seeds - Maíz Morado "Kculli" Seeds Gallery - 6
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A növény ellenáll a hidegnek és a fagynak
Paulownia Tomentosa Seeds 1.95 - 5

Paulownia Tomentosa Seeds

Regular price 1,95 € -15% Ár 1,66 € (SKU: T 14 T)
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Paulownia Tomentosa Seeds (Empress, Foxglove Tree)</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 25 seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Paulownia tormentosa is known by many names; regardless of what you want to call it, there is no doubt about its impressive ornamental features. This beautiful tree puts on an awe inspiring show in spring. Its soft chamois velvet buds open into large violet to blue, trumpet-like blossoms which fill the air with a sweet fragrance. The flowers carried on long up curved shoots, look like large foxgloves.</p> <p>The huge leaves are an architectural delight: the soft, downy, large leaves appear after the flowers have opened.</p> <p>Native to eastern Asia, this exotic looking, deciduous tree is surprisingly hardy and can tolerate harsh winters, to - 8*C (-14*F). Hardy throughout the British Isles, the buds of the Foxglove-like flowers are formed in the autumn and can be damaged by late frosts. They must be sheltered from hard frosts to ensure the violet blooms appear in spring.</p> <div> <div>It is a fast growing tree, usually grown as a specimen or shade tree. Growing rapidly (to 6f)t in it first year. In 3-5 years, this tree achieves what many other tree species take generations to achieve. An excellent use of this plant is the production of "stooled" specimens giving perhaps the most magnificent of all foliage dot plants. All growth is cut down to ground level each March and the resultant suckers reduced to a single shoot. The result is a strong, erect growth rising to 10 ft. and bearing huge and handsome leaves, producing a most striking effect. In very cold zones they are often grown and cut to near ground level in autumn and grown as a large-leafed shrub the following season.</div> <div>Very easy to germinate, seedlings grow rapidly, flowering in as little as 2-3 years under good growing conditions.</div> <div>It has been awarded the prestigious RHS Award of Garden Merit.</div> <div>Named after the Princess of the Dutch region, Anna Paulowna, who died in 1865. It has never been found in the wild although it undoubtedly originated in China where an old custom is to plant an Empress Tree when a baby girl is born. The fast-growing tree matures as she does. When she is eligible for marriage the tree is cut down and carved into wooden articles for her dowry. Carving the wood of Paulownia is an art form in Japan and China.</div> <div>Sowing: </div> <div>Sow September to May</div> <div>The seeds are very small so sow as thinly as possible to avoid crowding which leave seedlings more susceptible to damping off. Place the seeds on the surface of a tray containing well drained compost. Do not cover the seeds as light is required for germination.</div> <div>Stand the tray in water to soak and either cover with a plastic dome or place the tray into a plastic bag. Temperatures should ideally not exceed 30*C (85*F) during the daytime and not below 18*C (60*F) at night. Always keep the soil mixture moist (not soaked) during the germination process. The seeds will germinate in 30 – 60 days and grow rapidly when conditions are favourable.</div> <div>Growing: </div> <div>After germination, remove the cover or bag. When seedlings are big enough to handle (about 2-3 weeks), carefully transfer to pots. Grow on until they are strong enough to plant into their permanent positions. Harden off before planting out (after the last expected frosts).</div> <div>Aftercare: </div> <div>Pruning should be done in autumn after leaf drop. prune down to where an axillary bud can take over as the single leader. Coppicing a tree annually sacrifices the flowers but produces 3m (10ft) stems with enormous leaves up to 60cm (2ft) across.</div> <div>Plant Uses: </div> <div>A specimen tree, shade tree, or focal point.</div> <span style="font-size: 11px; line-height: 1.5em;">Fully hardy to -25°C.</span></div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Light germinator! Only sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + slightly press on</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">22-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">4-6 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>
T 14 T
Paulownia Tomentosa Seeds 1.95 - 5
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Japánból származó változat
Purple Shiso Seeds (Perilla frutescens var. crispa) 1.55 - 1

Purple Shiso Seeds (Perilla...

Regular price 1,55 € -15% Ár 1,32 € (SKU: MHS 18)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Purple Shiso Seeds (Perilla frutescens var. crispa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,09g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Perilla frutescens var. crispa, or shiso (/ˈʃiːsoʊ/,[2] from the Japanese シソ), belongs to the genus Perilla, in the mint family, Lamiaceae. Shiso is a perennial plant that may be cultivated as an annual in temperate climates. The plant occurs in purple-leaved ("red") and green-leaved ("green") forms. There are also frilly ruffled-leaved forms (chirimen-jiso) and forms that are red only on the underside (katamen-jiso). Different parts of the plant have a number of culinary uses in East Asian and Southeast Asian cuisine.</p> <p><strong>Names</strong></p> <p>This herb has also been known in English as the "beefsteak plant", possibly on account of the purple-leaved varieties evoking the bloody-red color of meat.[3] It is sometimes referred to by its genus name, perilla, but this is ambiguous as it could also refer to a different cultigen (Perilla frutescens var. frutescens) which is distinguished as egoma in Japan and tul-kkae or "wild sesame" in Korea.[4][5] The perilla or "beefsteak plant" began to be recognized by the native Japanese name shiso among American diners of Japanese cuisine, especially aficionados of sushi in the later decades of the 20th century.[6]</p> <p>In Japan, the cultigen is called shiso (紫蘇/シソ; [ɕiso̞]).[7][8] In Vietnam, it is called tía tô ([tiɜ˧ˀ˦ to˧]).[9] The Japanese name shiso and the Vietnamese tía tô are cognates, each loan words from zǐsū (紫苏/紫蘇),[10] which means Perilla frutescens in Chinese. (Perilla frutescens var. crispa is called huíhuísū (回回苏/回回蘇) in Chinese.) The first character 紫[11] means "purple",[7] and the second 蘇[12] means "to be resurrected, revived, rehabilitated". In Japan, shiso traditionally denoted the purple-red form.[13] In recent years, green is considered typical, and red considered atypical.[citation needed]</p> <p>The red-leaved form of shiso was introduced into the West around the 1850s,[14] when the ornamental variety was usually referred to as P. nankinensis. This red-leafed border plant eventually earned the English-language name "beefsteak plant".</p> <p>Other common names include "perilla mint",[15] "Chinese basil",[16][17][18] and "wild basil".[16] The alias "wild coleus"[19] or "summer coleus"[16] probably describe ornamental varieties. The red shiso or su tzu types are called purple mint[16] or purple mint plant.[15] It is called rattlesnake weed[16] in the Ozarks, because the sound the dried stalks make when disturbed along a footpath is similar to a rattlesnake's rattling sound.</p> <p><strong>Origins and distribution</strong></p> <p>Suggested native origins are mountainous terrains of India and China,[21] although some books say Southeast Asia.</p> <p>Shiso spread throughout ancient China. One of the early mentions on record occurs in Renown Physician's Extra Records (Chinese: 名醫別錄; pinyin: Míng Yī Bié Lù), around 500 AD,[23] where it is listed as su (蘇), and some of its uses are described.</p> <p>The perilla was introduced into Japan around the eighth to ninth centuries.</p> <p>The species was introduced into the Western horticulture as an ornamental and became widely naturalized and established in the United States and may be considered weedy or invasive.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Though now lumped into a single species of polytypic character, the two cultigens continue to be regarded as distinct commodities in the Asian countries where they are most exploited. While they are morphologically similar, the modern strains are readily distinguishable. Accordingly, the description is used separately or comparatively for the cultivars.</p> <p>Shiso grows to 40–100 centimetres (16–39 in) tall.[25] It has broad ovate leaves with pointy ends and serrated margins, arranged oppositely with long leafstalks.[citation needed] Shiso's distinctive flavor comes from its perillaldehyde component,[26] which present only in low concentration in other perilla varieties.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The red (purple) forms of the shiso (forma purpurea and crispa) come from its pigment, called "perilla anthocyanin" or shisonin[27] The color is present in both sides of the leaves, the entire stalk, and flower buds (calyces).</p> <p>The red crinkly-leafed version (called chirimenjiso in Japan) was the form of shiso first examined by Western botany, and Carl Peter Thunberg named it P. crispa (the name meaning "wavy or curly"). That Latin name was later retained when the shiso was reclassed as a variety.</p> <p>Bicolored cultivars (var. Crispa forma discolor Makino; カタメンジソ (katamenjiso) or katamen shiso) are red on the underside of the leaf.[28][29] Green crinkly-leafed cultivars (called chirimenaojiso, forma viridi-crispa) are seen.</p> <p>Shiso produces harder, smaller seeds compared to other perilla varieties.[30][31] Shiso seeds weigh about 1.5 g per 1000 seeds.[32]</p> <p><strong>Red shiso</strong></p> <p>The purple-red type may be known as akajiso (赤ジソ/紅ジソ "red shiso"). It is often used for coloring umeboshi (English: pickled plum). The shiso leaf turns bright red when it reacts with the umezu, the vinegary brine that wells up from the plums after being pickled in their vats.[7][33] The red pigment is identified as the Perilla anthocyanin, a.k.a. shisonin.[34] The mature red leaves make undesirable raw salad leaves, but germinated sprouts, or me-jiso (芽ジソ), have been long used as garnish to accent a Japanese dish, such as a plate of sashimi.[7][35] The tiny pellets of flower-buds (ho-jiso) and seed pods (fruits) can be scraped off using the chopstick or fingers and mixed into the soy sauce dip to add the distinct spicy flavor, especially to flavor fish.[35][36]</p> <p><strong>Green shiso</strong></p> <p>Bunches of green shiso-leaves packaged in styrofoam trays can be found on supermarket shelves in Japan and Japanese food markets in the West. Earnest production of the leafy herb did not begin until the 1960s. Shimbo (2001), p. 58</p> <p>One anecdote is that c. 1961, a cooperative or guild of tsuma (ツマ "garnish") commodities based in Shizuoka Prefecture picked large-sized green leaves of shiso and shipped them to the Osaka market. They gained popularity such that ōba (大葉 "big leaf") became the trade name for bunches of picked green leaves.</p> <p>A dissenting account places its origin in the city of Toyohashi, Aichi, the foremost ōba-producer in the country,[38] and claims Toyohashi's Greenhouse Horticultural Agricultural Cooperative[a] experimented with planting c. 1955, and around 1962 started merchandizing the leaf part as Ōba. In 1963 they organized "cooperative sorting and sales" of the crop (kyōsen kyōhan (共選・共販), analogous to cranberry cooperatives in the US) and c. 1970 they achieved year-round production.[39]</p> <p>The word ōba was originally a trade name and was not entered into the Shin Meikai kokugo jiten until its 5th edition (Kindaichi (1997)) and is absent from the 4th edition (1989). This dictionary is more progressive than the Kojien cited previously, as Kindaichi's dictionary, from the 1st ed. (1972), and definitely in the 2nd ed. (1974) defined shiso as a plant with leaves of "purple(green) color".[40]</p> <p><strong>Chemical composition</strong></p> <p>Shiso contain only about 25.2–25.7% lipid,[41] but still contains a comparable 60% ratio of ALA.[42][43]</p> <p>The plant produces the natural product perilloxin, which is built around a 3-benzoxepin moiety. Perilloxin inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase with an IC50 of 23.2 μM.[44] Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin and ibuprofen also work by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase enzyme family.</p> <p>Of the known chemotypes of perilla, PA (main component: perillaldehyde) is the only one used for culinary purposes. Other chemotypes are PK (perilla ketone), EK (eschscholzia ketone), PL (perillene), PP (phenylpropanoids: myristicin, dillapiole, elemicin), C (citral) and a type rich in rosefuran.</p> <p>Perilla ketone is toxic to some animals. When cattle and horses consume purple mint (of the PK chemotype) while grazing in fields in which it grows, the perilla ketone causes pulmonary edema, leading to a condition sometimes called perilla mint toxicosis.</p> <p>The oxime of perillaldehyde (perillartin) is used as an artificial sweetener in Japan, as it is about 2,000 times sweeter than sucrose.</p> <p>The pronounced flavor and aroma of shiso derives from perillaldehyde,[45] but this substance is lacking in the "wild sesame" and "sesame leaf" variety. Other aromatic essential oils present are limonene,[45] caryophyllene,[45] and farnesene.[citation needed]</p> <p>Many forms are rich in perilla ketone, which is a potent lung toxin to some livestock,[46] though effects on humans remains to be studied.[46]</p> <p>The artificial sweetener perillartine can be synthesized from perillaldehyde, but it is used in Japan only for sweetening tobacco,[47] despite being 2000 times sweeter than sucrose, owing to its bitterness and aftertaste, and insolubility in water.[48]</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>In temperate climates, the plant is self-sowing, but the seeds[ambiguous] are not viable after long storage, and germination rates are low after a year.</p> <p>The weedy types have often lost the characteristic shiso fragrance and are not suited for eating (cf. perilla ketone). Also, the red leaves are not ordinarily served raw.</p> <p><strong>Culinary use</strong></p> <p>See under Perilla for a survey of the herbal and spice uses of the species in different countries</p> <p><strong>Japan</strong></p> <p>Called shiso (紫蘇) in Japanese, P. frutescens var. crispa leaves, seeds, and sprouts are used extensively in Japanese cuisine. Green leaves, called aojiso (青紫蘇; "blue shiso"), are used as a herb in cold noodle dishes (hiyamugi and sōmen), cold tofu (hiyayakko), tataki and namerō. Aojiso is also served fresh with sashimi. Purple leaves, called akajiso (赤紫蘇; "red shiso"), are used to dye pickled plums (umeboshi). Shiso seed pods are salted and preserved to be used as a spice, while the germinated sprouts called mejiso (芽紫蘇) are used as garnish. The inflorescence of shiso, called hojiso (穂紫蘇), is used as garnish on a sashimi plate.</p> <p>The Japanese name for the variety of perilla normally used in Japanese cuisine (Perilla frutescens var. crispa) is shiso (紫蘇). This name is already commonplace in US mass media's coverage of Japanese restaurants and cuisine. The Japanese call the green type aojiso (青紫蘇), or ooba ("big leaf"), and often eat the fresh leaves with sashimi (sliced raw fish) or cut them into thin strips in salads, spaghetti, and meat and fish dishes. It is also used as a savory herb in a variety of dishes, even as a pizza topping (initially it was used in place of basil). In the summer of 2009, Pepsi Japan released a seasonal flavored beverage, Pepsi Shiso.</p> <p>The Japanese shiso leaves grow in green, red, and bicolored forms, and crinkly (chirimen-jiso) varieties, as noted. Parts of the plants eaten are the leaves, flower and buds from the flower stalks, fruits and seeds, and sprouts.</p> <p>The purple form is called akajiso (赤紫蘇, red shiso), and is used to dye umeboshi (pickled ume) red or combined with ume paste in sushi to make umeshiso maki. It can also be used to make a sweet, red juice to enjoy during summer.</p> <p>Japanese use green shiso leaves raw with sashimi. Dried leaves are also infused to make tea.[citation needed] The red shiso leaf is not normally consumed fresh, but needs to be e.g. cured in salt.[clarification needed] The pigment in the leaves turns from purple to bright red color when steeped in umezu, and is used to color and flavor umeboshi.</p> <p>An inflorescence of shiso, called hojiso (ear shiso), is typically used as garnish on a sashimi plate; the individual flowers can be stripped off the stem using the chopstick, adding its flavor to the soy sauce dip. The fruits of the shiso (shiso-no-mi), containing fine seeds (mericarp) about 1 mm or less in diameter (about the size of mustard seed), can be preserved in salt and used as a spice or condiment. Young leaves and flower buds are used for pickling in Japan and Taiwan.</p> <p>The other type of edible perilla (Perilla frutescens) called egoma (荏胡麻) is of limited culinary importance in Japan, though this is the variety commonly used in nearby Korea. The cultivar is known regionally as jūnen in the Tohoku (northeast) regions of Japan. The term means "ten years", supposedly because it adds this many years to one's lifespan. A preparation called shingorō, made in Fukushima prefecture, consists of half-pounded unsweet rice patties which are skewered, smeared with miso, blended with roasted and ground jūnen seeds, and roasted over charcoal. The oil pressed from this plant was once used to fuel lamps in the Middle Ages.[clarification needed] The warlord Saitō Dōsan, who started out in various occupations, was a peddler of this type of oil, rather than the more familiar rapeseed oil, according to a story by historical novelist Ryōtarō Shiba.</p> <p>A whole leaf of green shiso is often used as a receptacle to hold wasabi, or various tsuma (garnishes) and ken (daikon radishes, etc., sliced into fine threads). It seems to have superseded baran,[citation needed] the serrated green plastic film, named after the Aspidistra plant, once used in takeout sushi boxes.</p> <p><strong>Green leaves</strong></p> <p>The green leaf can be chopped and used as herb or condiment for an assortment of cold dishes such as:</p> <p>cold noodles (hiyamugi, sōmen)</p> <p>cold tofu (known as Hiyayakko)</p> <p>tataki and namerō</p> <p>Chopped leaves can be used to flavor any number of fillings or batter to be cooked, for use in warm dishes. A whole leaf battered on the obverse side is made into tempura.[50] Whole leaves are often combined with shrimp or other fried items.</p> <p><strong>Red leaves</strong></p> <p>Red leaves are used for making pickled plum (umeboshi) as mentioned, but this is no longer a yearly chore undertaken by the average household. Red shiso is used to color shiba-zuke [ja], a type of pickled eggplant served in Kyoto. (Cucumber, myoga, and shiso seeds may also be used),[51] Kyoto specialty.</p> <p><strong>Seeds</strong></p> <p>The seed pods or berries of the shiso may be salted and preserved like a spice.[52] They can be combined with fine slivers of daikon to make a simple salad.</p> <p>One source from the 1960s says that oil expressed from shiso seeds was once used for deep-frying purposes.</p> <p><strong>Sprouts</strong></p> <p>The germinated sprouts (cotyledons)[53] used as garnish are known as mejiso (芽ジソ). Another reference refers to the me-jiso as the moyashi (sprout) of the shiso.[7]</p> <p>Any time it is mentioned that shiso "buds" are used, there is reason to suspect this is a mistranslation for "sprouts" since the word me (芽) can mean either.[54][b]</p> <p>Though young buds or shoots are not usually used in restaurants, the me-jiso used could be microgreen size.[55] People engaged in growing their own shiso in planters refer to the plucked seedlings they have thinned as mejiso.[56][better source needed]</p> <p><strong>Yukari</strong></p> <p>The name yukari refers to dried and pulverized red-shiso flakes,[57] and has become as a generic term,[58] although Mishima Foods Co. [ja] insists it is the proprietary name for its products.[59] The term yukari-no-iro has signified the color purple since the Heian period, based on a poem in the Kokin Wakashū (c. 910) about a murasaki or gromwell blooming in Musashino (an old name for the Tokyo area).[60] Moreover, the term Murasaki-no-yukari [ja] has been used as an alias for Lady Murasaki's romance of the shining prince.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Furikake</strong></p> <p>Other than the yukari variety, there are many commercial brand furikake-type sprinkle-seasoning products that contain shiso. They can be sprinkled on rice or mixed into musubi. They are often sprinkled on pasta.</p> <p>Shiso pasta can be made from fresh-chopped leaves, sometimes combined with the crumbled roe of tarako.[61] Rather than cooking the cod roe, the hot pasta is tossed into it.</p> <p><strong>Korea</strong></p> <ol> <li>frutescens var. crispa, called soyeop (소엽) or chajogi (차조기), is a less-popular culinary plant than P. frutescens in Korea. It is, however, a commonly seen wild plant, and the leaves are occasionally used as a ssam vegetable.[62] The purplish leaves are sometimes pickled in soy sauce or soybean paste as a jangajji, or deep-fried with a thin coat of rice-flour batter.[62]</li> </ol> <p><strong>Laos</strong></p> <p>The purple leaves, called pak maengda (ຜັກແມງດາ), are strong in fragrance, but not ruffled. They are used for Lao rice vermicelli, khao poon (ເຂົ້າປຸ້ນ), which is very similar to the Vietnamese bún. They are used as part of the dish for their fragrance.</p> <p><strong>Vietnam</strong></p> <p>Tía tô is a cultivated P. frutescens var. crispa in Vietnam,[63] which compared to the Japanese shiso has slightly smaller leaves but much-stronger aromatic flavor. It is native to Southeast Asia.[64][65] Unlike the Perilla frutescens counterpart, the leaves on the Vietnamese perilla have green color on the top side and purplish-red on the bottom side.</p> <p>In North and South Vietnam, the Vietnamese perilla are eaten raw or used in Vietnamese salads, soups, or stir-fried dishes. The strong flavors are perfect for cooking seafoods such as shrimp and fish dishes. Aromatic leaves are also widely used in pickling. Plants can be grown in open fields, gardens, or containers.</p> <p>Vietnamese cuisine uses a P. frutescens var. crispa variety similar to the Japanese perilla, but with greenish bronze on the top face and purple on the opposite face. The leaves are smaller and have a much stronger fragrance. In Vietnamese, it is called tía tô, derived from the characters (紫蘇) whose standard pronunciation in Vietnamese is tử tô. It is usually eaten as a garnish in rice vermicelli dishes called bún and a number of stews and simmered dishes.</p> <p><strong>Ornamental use</strong></p> <p>The red-leaved shiso, in earlier literature referred to as Perilla nankinensis, became available to gardening enthusiasts in England circa 1855.[14] By 1862, the English were reporting overuse of this plant, and proposing Coleus vershaeffeltii [66] or Amaranthus melancholicus var. ruber made available by J.G. Veitch [67] as an alternative.</p> <p>It was introduced later in the United States, perhaps in the 1860s.[68][69]</p> <p><strong>Nutritional</strong></p> <p>Bactericidal and preservative effects of the shiso, due to the presence of terpenes such as perilla alcohol, have been noted.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 18 (0.09 g)
Purple Shiso Seeds (Perilla frutescens var. crispa) 1.55 - 1
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Tomatillo Verde Seeds - Physalis Ixocarpa

Tomatillo Seeds - Toma...

Regular price 2,65 € -15% Ár 2,25 € (SKU: VT 163 TV)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Tomatillo Seeds - Toma Verde (Physalis ixocarpa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Tomatillos are irreplaceable as a vegetable and part of salas, especially in Mexican cuisine, and cannot be replaced with green tomatoes. Tomatillos has the ability to thicken the sauce and soup, so other thickeners can be omitted.</p> <p>The original distribution area of Tomatillo is Mexico. Therefore, vegetables are also called Mexican tomatoes or Mexican cherries. Tomatillo is a herbaceous and shrubby growing perennial plant with serrated leaves that can reach one to two meters in height.</p> <p>Unlike other Phisalis species, Tomatillo is barely hairy. Its yellow flowers are dark brown to black in the middle. The champion-shaped bracts are green and purple at first and dry. Spherical fruits are like tomatoes, which are green, yellow or purple, depending on the variety. They have a sweet-sour aroma and are used for seasoning sauces, especially in Mexico and Central America. In addition, Tomatilo is mainly grown in the southern United States. Tomatillo is still relatively unknown. However, this could change quickly due to the relatively uncomplicated cultivation and their high yields.</p> <p>As Tomatillo belongs to the plants of the tomato family, it forms its fruits best in a sheltered from the wind and in a sunny place, in loose and nutrient-rich soil. Areas with a winegrowing climate are particularly suitable for cultivation. Before planting, it proved useful to improve the soil with little compost.</p> <p>Sowing</p> <p>Tomatillos can be sown from mid-February to the end of March. The seeds are grown in seed pods on a window or in a greenhouse. To do this, sow the seeds in small pots with sowing soil and place them as light and warm as possible, ideally a germination temperature of 20 to 27 degrees Celsius. Keep seedlings that appear after about a week or two moistened with warm water. If the seedlings are large enough to touch, they are transferred to pots five to eight inches in size. Cure young plants in a warm and sunny place for about four to five weeks before planting them outside.</p> <p>Unlike Andean berries, tomatillos depend not only on insect pollination but also on cross-pollinators, so at least two plants are required to harvest. Planting should be done in late May, when there is no more frost. Sow the plants very low, as the stems in contact with the soil will develop more roots. Keep the distance from plant to plant 80 x 80 centimeters, as plants grow abundantly. Regularly water the tomatillos and fertilize them every two weeks with a plant-based fertilizer, such as horse or other.</p> <p>The first tomatillos are ready to harvest after about 70 days. The fruits grow so large that they split the protective membrane. Then they mature and fall to the ground. In some varieties, ripe fruits turn purple or golden yellow under the influence of light. The fruit is delicious sour-sweet, depending on the variety. The fruits can be eaten raw, but are mostly processed into salsa, sauces, sauces and soups. In their home country, Mexico, they are known as the main ingredient of "Salsa verde". But they can also be used in vegetable dishes. The fruits can be refrigerated for several days to several weeks.</p> <p>You can grow Tomatillo for several years if you are wintering the plant indoors. However, since it is very sensitive to cold, it has only been grown for a year. If stored in a large flower pots, you should cut it two-thirds after harvest and hibernate in a bright place with a temperature of about ten degrees Fahrenheit. From March, you should gradually get used to the higher temperatures and sunshine before setting it outdoors.</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 163 TV (10 S)
Tomatillo Verde Seeds - Physalis Ixocarpa
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Creeping Thyme - Purple Creeping Seeds (Thymus Serpyllum) 1.95 - 6

Purple Creeping Thyme Seeds...

Regular price 1,95 € -15% Ár 1,66 € (SKU: MHS 111)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Purple Creeping Thyme Seeds (Thymus Serpyllum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>One of the best low growing ground covers, Thymus serpyllum forms evergreen dense cushions 5 to 10cm (2 to 4in) tall. The stems creep along the ground rather than rise vertically and grow 10 to 30cm (4 to 12in) long.</p> <p>Blooming from May through to August with clusters of flowers in shades of purple-violet, the plants flower so prolifically, you can hardly see the evergreen leaves below.  There are very few ground covers that can be walked-on, but creeping thyme is one of them. It is suitable as a lawn substitute in small areas, an ideal ground cover to use between stepping stones or near to patios and walkways. Scented flowers.</p> <h3><strong>SOWING</strong></h3> <p>Sow: March - June / September - October</p> <p>Season: Perennial</p> <p>Height: 4 inches / 20 cm</p> <p>Width: 12 - 18 inches (30 - 45 cm)</p> <p>Bloom Season: May - September</p> <p>Bloom Color: Purple</p> <p>Position: Full sun to partial shade</p> <p>Soil Type: Well-drained, pH 5.8 - 6.8</p> <p>Depth: Do not cover the seed but press into the soil</p> <p>Plant Spacing: 12 inches / 25 cm</p>
MHS 111 (50 S)
Creeping Thyme - Purple Creeping Seeds (Thymus Serpyllum) 1.95 - 6
  • -15%
Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum...

Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum...

Regular price 2,05 € -15% Ár 1,74 € (SKU: MHS 117)
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5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Coriander Seeds Herb (Coriandrum Sativum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 200 seeds (2g).</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Coriander</b><span> </span>(<span class="nowrap"><span class="IPA nopopups noexcerpt">/<span><span title="/ˌ/: secondary stress follows">ˌ</span><span title="'k' in 'kind'">k</span><span title="/ɒr/: 'or' in 'moral'">ɒr</span><span title="/i/: 'y' in 'happy'">i</span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="/æ/: 'a' in 'bad'">æ</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span><span title="'d' in 'dye'">d</span><span title="/ər/: 'er' in 'letter'">ər</span></span>,<span class="wrap"><span> </span></span><span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="'k' in 'kind'">k</span><span title="/ɒr/: 'or' in 'moral'">ɒr</span><span title="/i/: 'y' in 'happy'">i</span><span title="/æ/: 'a' in 'bad'">æ</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span><span title="'d' in 'dye'">d</span><span title="/ər/: 'er' in 'letter'">ər</span></span>/</span></span>;<sup id="cite_ref-epd_coriander_1-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span><i>Coriandrum sativum</i>) is an<span> </span>annual<span> </span>herb<span> </span>in the family<span> </span>Apiaceae. It is also known as<span> </span><b>Chinese parsley</b>, and in North America, the stems and leaves are usually called<span> </span><b>cilantro</b><span> </span>(<span class="nowrap"><span class="IPA nopopups noexcerpt">/<span><span title="'s' in 'sigh'">s</span><span title="/ɪ/: 'i' in 'kit'">ɪ</span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="'l' in 'lie'">l</span><span title="/æ/: 'a' in 'bad'">æ</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span><span title="'t' in 'tie'">t</span><span title="'r' in 'rye'">r</span><span title="/oʊ/: 'o' in 'code'">oʊ</span></span>,<span class="wrap"><span> </span></span>-<span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="'l' in 'lie'">l</span><span title="/ɑː/: 'a' in 'father'">ɑː</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span></span>-/</span></span>).<sup id="cite_ref-epd_cilantro_2-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds (as a<span> </span>spice) are the parts most traditionally used in cooking.</p> <p>Most people perceive the taste of coriander leaves as a tart, lemon/lime taste, but a smaller group of about 3–21% of people tested (depending on ethnicity) think the leaves taste like<span> </span>dish soap, linked to a<span> </span>gene<span> </span>which detects some specific<span> </span>aldehydes<span> </span>that are also used as odorant substances in many soaps and detergents</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Botanical_description">Botanical description</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7c/Coriandrum_sativum_003.JPG/225px-Coriandrum_sativum_003.JPG" width="225" height="225" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Flowers of<i><span> </span>Coriandrum sativum</i></div> </div> </div> <p>Coriander is native to regions spanning from<span> </span>Southern Europe<span> </span>and<span> </span>Northern Africa<span> </span>to<span> </span>Southwestern Asia. It is a soft plant growing to 50 cm (20 in) tall. The leaves are variable in shape, broadly lobed at the base of the plant, and slender and feathery higher on the flowering stems. The<span> </span>flowers<span> </span>are borne in small<span> </span>umbels, white or very pale pink, asymmetrical, with the petals pointing away from the center of the umbel longer (5–6 mm or 0.20–0.24 in) than those pointing toward it (only 1–3 mm or 0.039–0.118 in long). The<span> </span>fruit<span> </span>is a globular, dry<span> </span>schizocarp<span> </span>3–5 mm (0.12–0.20 in) in diameter. Pollen size is approximately 33 microns.</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/69/Coriander-2019-5-11_20-17-8-01.jpg/220px-Coriander-2019-5-11_20-17-8-01.jpg" width="220" height="292" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Coriander pollen</div> </div> </div> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Etymology">Etymology</span></h2> <p>First attested in English in the late 14th century, the word "coriander" derives from the<span> </span>Old French:<span> </span><i>coriandre</i>, which comes from<span> </span>Latin:<span> </span><i>coriandrum</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>in turn from<span> </span>Ancient Greek:<span> </span><span lang="grc" xml:lang="grc">κορίαννον</span>,<span> </span><i>koriannon</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup><span> </span>derived from<span> </span>Ancient Greek:<span> </span><span lang="grc" xml:lang="grc">κόρις</span>,<span> </span><i>kóris</i><span> </span>(a bed bug), and was given on account of its foetid, bed bug-like smell.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup><span> </span>The earliest attested form of the word is the<span> </span>Mycenaean Greek<span> </span><i><i>ko-ri-ja-da-na</i></i><sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup><span> </span>written in<span> </span>Linear B<span> </span>syllabic script (reconstructed as<span> </span><i><i>koriadnon</i></i>, similar to the name of<span> </span>Minos's daughter<span> </span>Ariadne) which later evolved to<span> </span><i>koriannon</i><span> </span>or<span> </span><i>koriandron</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-Chadwick_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>koriander</i><span> </span>(German).<sup id="cite_ref-spice_10-0" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <p><i><i>Cilantro</i></i><span> </span>is the Spanish word for coriander, also deriving from<span> </span><i>coriandrum</i>. It is the common term in<span> </span>North American<span> </span>English<span> </span>for coriander leaves, due to their extensive use in<span> </span>Mexican cuisine.<sup id="cite_ref-spice_10-1" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Origin">Origin</span></h2> <p>Although native to<span> </span>Iran,<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup><span> </span>coriander grows wild over a wide area of Western Asia and Southern Europe, prompting the comment: "It is hard to define exactly where this plant is wild and where it only recently established itself."<sup id="cite_ref-ZoharyHopf_12-0" class="reference">[12]</sup><span> </span>Fifteen desiccated<span> </span>mericarps<span> </span>were found in the<span> </span>Pre-Pottery Neolithic B<span> </span>level of the<span> </span>Nahal Hemar<span> </span>Cave in<span> </span>Israel, which may be the oldest archaeological find of coriander. About half a litre of coriander mericarps was recovered from the tomb of<span> </span>Tutankhamen, and because this plant does not grow wild in Egypt, Zohary and Hopf interpret this find as proof that coriander was cultivated by the<span> </span>ancient Egyptians.<sup id="cite_ref-ZoharyHopf_12-1" class="reference">[12]</sup></p> <p>Coriander seems to have been cultivated in Greece since at least the second millennium BC. One of the<span> </span>Linear B<span> </span>tablets recovered from<span> </span>Pylos<span> </span>refers to the species as being cultivated for the manufacture of perfumes; it apparently was used in two forms: as a spice for its seeds and as a herb for the flavour of its leaves.<sup id="cite_ref-Chadwick_9-1" class="reference">[9]</sup><span> </span>This appears to be confirmed by archaeological evidence from the same period; the large quantities of the species retrieved from an<span> </span>Early Bronze Age<span> </span>layer at<span> </span>Sitagroi<span> </span>in<span> </span>Macedonia<span> </span>could point to cultivation of the species at that time.<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <p>All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the parts most traditionally used in cooking, Coriander is used in cuisines throughout the world.<sup id="cite_ref-Samuelsson_14-0" class="reference">[14]</sup></p> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li class="gallerybox"> <div> <div class="thumb"> <div><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f8/Corriander_leaves-Cocunut_chutney.jpg/280px-Corriander_leaves-Cocunut_chutney.jpg" width="187" height="140" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /></div> </div> <div class="gallerytext"> <p>Coriander leaves in coconut<span> </span>chutney</p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p><span> </span></p> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li class="gallerybox"> <div> <div class="thumb"> <div><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e1/Minty_pani_puri.jpg/280px-Minty_pani_puri.jpg" width="187" height="140" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /></div> </div> <div class="gallerytext"> <p>Minty pani puri</p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p><span> </span></p> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li class="gallerybox"> <div> <div class="thumb"> <div><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/be/Onion_Corriander_Paratha.JPG/280px-Onion_Corriander_Paratha.JPG" width="187" height="140" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /></div> </div> <div class="gallerytext"> <p>Onion coriander<span> </span>paratha</p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> <div></div> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Leaves">Leaves</span></h3> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/51/A_scene_of_Coriander_leaves.JPG/220px-A_scene_of_Coriander_leaves.JPG" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Coriander leaves</div> </div> </div> <p>The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, fresh coriander, dhania, Chinese parsley, or (in the US and commercially in Canada) cilantro.</p> <p>Coriander potentially may be confused with<span> </span>culantro<span> </span>(<i>Eryngium foetidum</i><span> </span>L.), an<span> </span>Apiaceae<span> </span>like coriander (<i>Coriandrum sativum</i><span> </span>L.), but from a different<span> </span>genus. Culantro has a distinctly different spiny appearance, a more potent volatile leaf oil<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup><span> </span>and a stronger aroma.</p> <p>The leaves have a different taste from the seeds, with<span> </span>citrus<span> </span>overtones.<sup id="cite_ref-McGee_16-0" class="reference">[16]</sup></p> <p>The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many South Asian foods (such as<span> </span>chutneys<span> </span>and salads); in Chinese, Thai, and Burmese dishes; in Mexican cooking, particularly in<span> </span>salsa<span> </span>and<span> </span>guacamole<span> </span>and as a garnish; and in salads in Russia and other<span> </span>CIS<span> </span>countries. In Portugal, chopped coriander is used in the bread soup<span> </span>Açorda, and in India, chopped coriander is a garnish on Indian dishes such as<span> </span><i>dal</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-Moulin_17-0" class="reference">[17]</sup><span> </span>As heat diminishes their flavour, coriander leaves are often used raw or added to the dish immediately before serving. In Indian and Central Asian recipes, coriander leaves are used in large amounts and cooked until the flavour diminishes.<sup id="cite_ref-spice_10-2" class="reference">[10]</sup><span> </span>The leaves spoil quickly when removed from the plant, and lose their aroma when dried or frozen.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Seeds">Seeds</span></h3> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/86/Coriander_Seeds.jpg/220px-Coriander_Seeds.jpg" width="220" height="147" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Dried coriander fruits, often called "coriander seeds" when used as a spice</div> </div> </div> <p>The dry fruits are known as coriander seeds. The word "coriander" in food preparation may refer solely to these seeds (as a spice), rather than to the plant. The seeds have a lemony citrus flavour when crushed, due to<span> </span>terpenes<span> </span>linalool<span> </span>and<span> </span>pinene. It is described as warm, nutty, spicy, and orange-flavoured.</p> <p>The variety<span> </span><i>C. s. vulgare</i><span> </span>has a fruit diameter of 3–5 mm (0.12–0.20 in), while var.<span> </span><i>C. s. microcarpum</i><span> </span>fruits have a diameter of 1.5–3 mm (0.06–0.12 in). Large-fruited types are grown mainly by tropical and subtropical countries, e.g. Morocco, India, and Australia, and contain a low volatile oil content (0.1-0.4%). They are used extensively for grinding and blending purposes in the spice trade. Types with smaller fruit are produced in temperate regions and usually have a volatile oil content around 0.4-1.8%, so are highly valued as a raw material for the preparation of essential oil.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup></p> <p>Coriander is commonly found both as whole dried seeds and in<span> </span>ground<span> </span>form. Roasting or heating the seeds in a dry pan heightens the flavour, aroma, and pungency. Ground coriander seed loses flavour quickly in storage and is best ground fresh. Coriander seed is a spice in<span> </span><i>garam masala</i><span> </span>and<span> </span>Indian<span> </span>curries which often employ the ground fruits in generous amounts together with<span> </span>cumin, acting as a thickener in a mixture called<span> </span><i>dhana jeera</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup><span> </span>Roasted coriander seeds, called<span> </span><i>dhana dal</i>, are eaten as a snack. They are the main ingredient of the two south Indian dishes<span> </span><i>sambhar</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>rasam</i>.</p> <p>Outside of Asia, coriander seed is used widely in the process for<span> </span>pickling<span> </span>vegetables. In Germany and South Africa (see<span> </span><i>boerewors</i>), the seeds are used while making sausages. In Russia and Central Europe, coriander seed is an occasional ingredient in<span> </span>rye<span> </span>bread (e.g.<span> </span>Borodinsky bread), as an alternative to<span> </span>caraway. The<span> </span>Zuni people<span> </span>of North America have adapted it into their cuisine, mixing the powdered seeds ground with chili and using it as a condiment with meat, and eating leaves as a salad.<sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup></p> <p>Coriander seeds are used in brewing certain styles of beer, particularly some Belgian<span> </span>wheat beers. The coriander seeds are used with orange peel to add a citrus character. Coriander seed is one of the main traditional ingredients in the South African<span> </span>Boerewors, a spiced mixed-meat sausage.</p> <p>One preliminary study showed coriander<span> </span>essential oil<span> </span>to inhibit<span> </span>Gram-positive<span> </span>and<span> </span>Gram-negative bacteria, including<span> </span><i>Staphylococcus aureus</i>,<span> </span><i>Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa,</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>Escherichia coli</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference">[21]</sup></p> <p>Coriander is listed as one of the original ingredients in the<span> </span>secret formula<span> </span>for<span> </span>Coca-Cola.<sup id="cite_ref-22" class="reference">[22]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Roots">Roots</span></h3> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Coriander_roots.JPG/220px-Coriander_roots.JPG" width="220" height="148" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Coriander roots</div> </div> </div> <p>Coriander<span> </span>roots<span> </span>have a deeper, more intense flavor than the leaves, and are used in a variety of Asian cuisines, especially in<span> </span>Thai dishes<span> </span>such as soups or<span> </span>curry pastes.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutrition">Nutrition</span></h2> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Coriander (cilantro) leaves, raw</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>95 kJ (23 kcal)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>3.67 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sugars</th> <td>0.87</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>2.8 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>0.52 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>2.13 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Vitamins</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin A equiv. <div>beta-Carotene</div> <div>lutein<span> </span>zeaxanthin</div> </th> <td> <div>42%</div> 337 μg <div> <div>36%</div> 3930 μg</div> <div>865 μg</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine<span> </span><span>(B1)</span></th> <td> <div>6%</div> 0.067 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin<span> </span><span>(B2)</span></th> <td> <div>14%</div> 0.162 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Niacin<span> </span><span>(B3)</span></th> <td> <div>7%</div> 1.114 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Pantothenic acid<span> </span><span>(B5)</span></th> <td> <div>11%</div> 0.57 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>6</span></th> <td> <div>11%</div> 0.149 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Folate<span> </span><span>(B9)</span></th> <td> <div>16%</div> 62 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>33%</div> 27 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin E</th> <td> <div>17%</div> 2.5 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin K</th> <td> <div>295%</div> 310 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Minerals</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>7%</div> 67 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>14%</div> 1.77 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>7%</div> 26 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Manganese</th> <td> <div>20%</div> 0.426 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>7%</div> 48 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>11%</div> 521 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sodium</th> <td> <div>3%</div> 46 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Zinc</th> <td> <div>5%</div> 0.5 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Other constituents</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Water</th> <td>92.21 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><hr /> <div class="wrap">Link to USDA Database entry</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg =<span> </span>micrograms • mg =<span> </span>milligrams</li> <li>IU =<span> </span>International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap"><sup>†</sup>Percentages are roughly approximated using<span> </span>US recommendations<span> </span>for adults.<span> </span><br /><span class="nowrap"><span>Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Raw coriander leaves are 92% water, 4%<span> </span>carbohydrates, 2%<span> </span>protein, and less than 1%<span> </span>fat<span> </span>(table). The nutritional profile of coriander seeds is different from the fresh stems or leaves. In a 100 gram reference amount, leaves are particularly rich in<span> </span>vitamin A,<span> </span>vitamin Cand<span> </span>vitamin K, with moderate content of<span> </span>dietary minerals<span> </span>(table). Although seeds generally have lower content of vitamins, they do provide significant amounts of<span> </span>dietary fiber,<span> </span>calcium,<span> </span>selenium,<span> </span>iron,<span> </span>magnesium<span> </span>and<span> </span>manganese.<sup id="cite_ref-23" class="reference">[23]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Taste_and_smell">Taste and smell</span></h2> <p>The<span> </span>essential oil<span> </span>from coriander leaves and seeds contains mixed<span> </span>polyphenols<span> </span>and<span> </span>terpenes, including<span> </span>linalool<span> </span>as the major constituent accounting for the aroma and flavor of coriander.<sup id="cite_ref-24" class="reference">[24]</sup></p> <p>Different people may perceive the taste of coriander leaves differently. Those who enjoy it say it has a refreshing, lemony or lime-like flavor, while those who dislike it have a strong aversion to its taste and smell, characterizing it as soapy or rotten.<sup id="cite_ref-McGee_16-1" class="reference">[16]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-25" class="reference">[25]</sup><span> </span>Studies also show variations in preference among different ethnic groups: 21% of East Asians, 17% of Caucasians, and 14% of people of African descent expressed a dislike for coriander, but among the groups where coriander is popular in their cuisine, only 7% of South Asians, 4% of Hispanics, and 3% of Middle Eastern subjects expressed a dislike.<sup id="cite_ref-26" class="reference">[26]</sup></p> <p>Studies have shown that 80% of identical twins shared the same preference for the herb, but fraternal twins agreed only about half the time, strongly suggesting a genetic component to the preference. In a genetic survey of nearly 30,000 people, two genetic variants linked to the perception of coriander have been found, the most common of which is a gene involved in sensing smells.<sup id="cite_ref-27" class="reference">[27]</sup><span> </span>The gene,<span> </span><i>OR6A2</i>, lies within a cluster of olfactory-receptor genes and encodes a receptor that is highly sensitive to<span> </span>aldehydechemicals. Flavor chemists have found that the coriander aroma is created by a half-dozen or so substances, and most of these are aldehydes. Those who dislike the taste are sensitive to the offending<span> </span>unsaturated<span> </span>aldehydes and at the same time may be unable to detect the aromatic chemicals that others find pleasant.<sup id="cite_ref-28" class="reference">[28]</sup><span> </span>Association between its taste and several other genes, including a bitter-taste receptor, have also been found.<sup id="cite_ref-nature-soapy-taste_3-1" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-29" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Allergy">Allergy</span></h2> <p>Some people are allergic to coriander leaves or seeds, having symptoms similar to those of other<span> </span>food allergies.<sup id="cite_ref-aip_30-0" class="reference">[30]</sup><span> </span>In one study, 32% of<span> </span>pin-prick<span> </span>tests in children and 23% in adults were positive for coriander and other members of the family Apiaceae, including<span> </span>caraway,<span> </span>fennel, and<span> </span>celery.<sup id="cite_ref-aip_30-1" class="reference">[30]</sup><span> </span>The allergic symptoms may be minor or life-threatening.</p>
MHS 117 (2g)
Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)
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Naranjilla - Lulo Seeds (Solanum quitoense) 2.45 - 1

Naranjilla - Lulo Seeds...

Regular price 1,95 € -15% Ár 1,66 € (SKU: V 11)
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<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Naranjilla - Lulo Seeds (Solanum quitoense)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of<strong> 10 </strong>seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><i style="font-size: 14px;"><b>Solanum quitoense</b></i><span style="font-size: 14px;">, known as</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><b style="font-size: 14px;">naranjilla</b><sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference"></sup><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">(</span><small>Spanish pronunciation: </small><span title="Representation in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)" class="IPA" style="font-size: 14px;">[naɾaŋˈxiʎa]</span><span style="font-size: 14px;">, "little</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">orange") in</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">Ecuador</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">and</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">Panama</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">and as</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><b style="font-size: 14px;">lulo</b><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">(</span><span title="Representation in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)" class="IPA" style="font-size: 14px;">[ˈlulo]</span><span style="font-size: 14px;">, from</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">Quechua) in</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">Colombia, is a</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">subtropical</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">perennial plant</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">from northwestern</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">South America. The specific name for this species of</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">nightshade</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">means "from</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">Quito."</span></p> <p>The naranjilla plant is attractive, with large elongated heart- or oval-shaped leaves up to 45 cm in length. The leaves and stems of the plant are covered in short purple hairs. Naranjilla is a delicate plant and must be protected from strong winds and direct sunlight. They grow best in partial shade.</p> <p>The fruit has a citrus flavor, sometimes described as a combination of rhubarb and lime. The juice of the naranjilla is green and is often used as a juice or for a fermented drink called lulada.</p> <h3>Classification</h3> <p>Within the genus <i style="font-size: 14px;">Solanum</i><span style="font-size: 14px;">,</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><i style="font-size: 14px;">S. quitoense</i><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">is a part of the subgenus Leptostemonum. Within this clade,</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><i style="font-size: 14px;">S. quitoense</i><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">belongs to the section Lasiocarpa. Other species within Lasiocarpa include:</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><i style="font-size: 14px;">S. candidum</i><span style="font-size: 14px;">,</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><i style="font-size: 14px;">S. hyporhodium</i><span style="font-size: 14px;">,</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><i style="font-size: 14px;">S. lasiocarpum</i><span style="font-size: 14px;">,</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><i style="font-size: 14px;">S. felinum</i><span style="font-size: 14px;">,</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><i style="font-size: 14px;">S. psudolulo</i><span style="font-size: 14px;">,</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><i style="font-size: 14px;">S. repandum</i><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><span style="font-size: 14px;">and</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"> </span><i style="font-size: 14px;">S. vestissimum</i><span style="font-size: 14px;">.</span></p> <div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Naranjilla_new_leaf.jpg/220px-Naranjilla_new_leaf.jpg" width="220" height="345" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Naranjilla new leaf</div> </div> </div> <p>Other plants bear morphological similarity to<span> </span><i>S. quitoense</i>, but they may or may not be closely related. Some of these plants are:<span> </span><i>S. hirtum</i>,<span> </span><i>S. myiacanthum</i>,<span> </span><i>S. pectinatum</i>,<span> </span><i>S. sessiliflorum</i><span> </span>and,<span> </span><i>S. verrogeneum</i>. Many of these plants, related or not, can be confused with<span> </span><i>S. quitoense</i>. Furthermore,<span> </span><i>Solanum quitoense'</i>s physical traits vary from plant to plant, making identification challenging: at least three varietals (with spines, without spines, or a third variety known as<span> </span><i>baquicha,</i><span> </span>which features red-ripening fruits and smooth leaves) are known to occur. One characteristic that is unique to<span> </span><i>S. quitoense</i><span> </span>is the ring of green flesh within the ripe fruit.<sup id="cite_ref-solanaceae_source_1-2" class="reference">[1]</sup><span> </span>The only related fruit to have green flesh is a cultivated variant of<span> </span><i>S. lasiocarpum</i>.</p> <p>The new growth of this plant is densely covered in protective<span> </span>trichomes. Coloration in the plant's trichomes around the new growth and flowers varies from purple to white. Identification can be difficult for this reason.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Agriculture">Agriculture</span></h2> <p>The naranjilla has been proposed as a new<span> </span>flavoring<span> </span>for the global food industry,<sup id="cite_ref-alanrevista_5-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>but it fares poorly in large-scale<span> </span>cultivation, presenting an obstacle to its wider use.<sup id="cite_ref-solanaceae_source_1-3" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>Its fruit, like tomatoes, is easily damaged when ripe, so it is usually harvested unripe.<sup id="cite_ref-alanrevista_5-1" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>The fruits are found in markets. It is common for locals to make beverages by adding sugar and water to the freshly squeezed fruits.<sup id="cite_ref-alanrevista_5-2" class="reference"></sup></p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/52/Salt_on_fruit.jpg/220px-Salt_on_fruit.jpg" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Rural Costa Rican farmers prepare fruit with salt.</div> </div> </div> <h3><span id="Pests_.26_diseases"></span><span class="mw-headline">Pests &amp; diseases</span></h3> <p><i>Solanum quitoense</i><span> </span>has limited potential in agriculture due to the plant's extreme vulnerability to pests and diseases when grown as a crop. One common type of<span> </span>infection<span> </span>is caused by the root-knot<span> </span>nematode. The ripe fruit is very delicate and is frequently attacked by fungus, especially when mechanically damaged, so it is often picked unripe to avoid rotting.<sup id="cite_ref-alanrevista_5-3" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>Hybrids are an increasingly popular solution to the nematode pest problem.<span> </span><i>S. quitoense</i><span> </span>has been hybridized with other plants, most commonly with<span> </span><i>S. sessiliflorum</i>, a plant with similar phenotypic traits. The leaves, flowers and fruits of<span> </span><i>S. sessiliflorum</i><span> </span>are similar in form to<span> </span><i>S. quitoense</i>, but has much larger fruits that are yellow; the resulting hybrids have fruits with yellowish fruit pulp.<sup id="cite_ref-solanaceae_source_1-4" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutrition">Nutrition</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/26/Solanum_quitoense_unripe_fruit_flesh.jpg/220px-Solanum_quitoense_unripe_fruit_flesh.jpg" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Unripe fruit flesh.</div> </div> </div> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/3/33/The_ripe_fruit_flesh.jpg/220px-The_ripe_fruit_flesh.jpg" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Ripe fruit flesh.</div> </div> </div> <p>Contents of the fruit varies from region to region. These statistics are based on<span> </span>Costa Rican<span> </span>fruit:</p> <table class="wikitable"> <tbody> <tr> <th>fruit nutrients</th> <th>percent contained in fruit</th> </tr> <tr> <td>Water</td> <td>90%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Protein</td> <td>1%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Fat</td> <td>less than .0001%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Carbohydrates</td> <td>3.8%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Fiber</td> <td>1.4%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Sugar</td> <td>3%</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Calories</td> <td>(kcal/100g) 18</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Vitamin C</td> <td>2.6%</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>These statistics are based on fruits found in<span> </span>Colombia<span> </span>and<span> </span>Ecuador:<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference"></sup></p> <table class="wikitable"> <tbody> <tr> <th>Fruit nutrients</th> <th>mg per 100g of nutrients.</th> </tr> <tr> <td>Calcium</td> <td>5.9–12.4 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Phosphorus</td> <td>12.0–43.7 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Iron</td> <td>0.34–0.64 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Carotene</td> <td>0.071–0.0232 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Thiamine</td> <td>0.04–0.094 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Riboflavin</td> <td>0.03–0.047 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Niacin</td> <td>1.19–1.76 mg</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">soak in warm water for 2-4  hours</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds only slightly cover with the substrate</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">23-25 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">usually between 2 to 4 weeks, or longer.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">watering during the growing season plentiful</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <div><span style="color: #008000;"><em> </em></span></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </body> </html>
V 11 (10 S)
Naranjilla - Lulo Seeds (Solanum quitoense) 2.45 - 1
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Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant Seeds (Solanum ferox) 2 - 1

Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant...

Regular price 2,25 € -15% Ár 1,91 € (SKU: VE 202)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant Seeds (Solanum ferox)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Tarambulo is a small, suberect, prickly, hairy herb, 0.5 to 1.5 meters high. Leaves are broadly ovate, 15 to 20 centimeters long, 12 to 23 centimeters wide, lobed at the margins, and densely covered with stiff wooly hairs above and wooly hairs and prickly spines on the nerves beneath; the lobes are triangular and 2.5 to 4 centimeters deep. Flowers are borne on lateral racemes. The calyx is shortly funnel-shaped, with ovate-triangular lobes. Corolla is densely wooly outside, white, oblong-loved, 2 to 2.5 centimeters long.</p> <p>The fruit is an EDIBLE berry, yellow, globose, 2.5 to 3.5 centimeters in diameter, densely covered with needle-like hairs, and many-seeded.</p>
VE 202 (10 S)
Tarambulo - Hairy eggplant Seeds (Solanum ferox) 2 - 1
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Mar Azul tomato seeds 1.75 - 1

Mar Azul paradicsommag

Regular price 2,45 € -15% Ár 2,08 € (SKU: VT 1 MA)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Mar Azul paradicsommag</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>10 vagy 20 magos csomag ára.</strong></span></h2> <strong>Idén, mint minden évben, új Mar Azul paradicsom növényeket vetünk. A képek 2021-ből származnak, és nem fogjuk őket minden évben megváltoztatni.</strong><br><br><strong>Nagyon érdekes, hogy a Mar Azul paradicsomfajta rendkívül erős és gyorsan növekszik. Eddig nem láttunk olyan paradicsomfajtát, amely gyorsabban nő, mint a Mar Azul. A gyökér rendkívül gyorsan fejlődik, és érdekes, hogy a növények már konténerekben kapják az oldalhajtásokat.</strong><br><br>A Mar Azul paradicsom egy teljesen új paradicsomfajta, amelyet teljesen természetes technikákkal nyernek. A paradicsom kékes színének köszönhető az antocianinok magas koncentrációja, a természetes növényi pigmentek, amelyek jelentős egészségügyi előnyökkel járnak.<br><br>Rá kell mutatnunk a szájban lévő paradicsom által kiváltott finom ízre, aromára és érzésekre is.<br><br>Kék-ibolya színű, intenzív, ragyogó vörös belső térrel, tökéletesen érett állapotban.<br><br>Ez egy bordázott vállú paradicsom, enyhén ropogós és sima állagú, alacsony savtartalmú.<br><br>Egészség<br><br>A Mar Azul paradicsomot szigorú táplálkozási vizsgálatoknak vetették alá annak funkcionális és egészséget adó tulajdonságainak meghatározása érdekében. A Granadai Egyetem Élelmiszertudományi és Technológiai Tanszéke bemutatta a fizikai-kémiai elemzés eredményeit, igazolva a paradicsom C- és B6-vitamin-tartalmát.<br><br>Kiváló mindenféle használatra! <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 1 MA (10 S)
Mar Azul tomato seeds 1.75 - 1
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Rocoto Manzano Seeds

Rocoto Manzano Seeds

Regular price 1,75 € -15% Ár 1,49 € (SKU: C 3)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Rocoto Manzano Fresh Organic Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong><strong><br /></strong></span></h2> <div>These plants produce HUGE chilies the size of racquetballs! The heat is similar to a habanero but these have MUCH BETTER FLAVOR (almost like a spicy butternut squash). Their thick flesh makes an amazing stuffed or grilled pepper! The plants leaves grow "hairy" and they produce beautiful purple leaves. </div> <div>Capsicum pubescens is a species of the genus Capsicum (pepper), known as rocoto (Quechua: ruqutu) and locoto (Aymara: luqutu), which is found primarily in Central and South America. It is known only in cultivation. The species name, pubescens, means hairy, which refers to the hairy leaves of this pepper. The hairiness of the leaves, along with the black seeds, distinguish this species from others.[4] As they reach a relatively advanced age and the roots lignify quickly, sometimes they are called tree chili. Of all the domesticated species of peppers, this is the least widespread and systematically furthest away from all others. It is reproductively isolated from other species of the genus Capsicum.[3] A very notable feature of this species is its ability to withstand cooler temperatures than other cultivated pepper plants,[5] but cannot withstand frost.</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Vegetative characteristics</strong></div> <div>Like all other species of the genus Capsicum, plants of the species Capsicum pubescens grow as a shrub, but sometimes as climbing plants. They grow into four-meter woody plants relatively quickly, and live up to 15 years, which gives them, especially with age, an almost tree-like appearance.[6] After a first impulse is formed, the plant branches at a height of about 30 cm for the first time, and forms during growth by further dividing into a bushy appearance. More shoots develop from the leaf axils. Some varieties have purple discoloration on the branches, as can be observed in other Capsicum species. The leaves have a 5–12 mm long petiole and a leaf blade ovate to 5–12 cm long, 2.5 to 4 cm wide, tapering at the top and the base is wedge-shaped.</div> <div>In addition to the relatively long life, Capsicum pubescens differs in many other characteristics from related species.</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Flowers</strong></div> <div>The flowers appear singly or in pairs (rarely up to four) on the shoots, and the branches are at about 1 cm long flower stems, which extend on the fruit to around 4–5 cm. The calyx has five triangular pointed teeth, which have in the fruit a length of about 1 mm. A characteristic different from other cultivated species of the genus Capsicum is the blue-violet-colored petals, brighter in the centre. The anthers are partly purple, partly white.</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Distribution</strong></div> <div>Capsicum pubescens is found in cultivation primarily in north-western South America, as well as southern Central America.[citation needed] It is believed to have evolved from other, more primitive Capsicum species also occurring in the same area.[citation needed] C. pubescens grows at higher elevations than other species, and cannot survive the tropical heat in the lowlands.</div> <div>There are several cultivars of C. pubescens; most are rarely cultivated, and are now relatively scarce.</div> <div>Cultivars include 'Canario' (yellow), 'Manzano' (red), 'Peron' (pear-shaped), and 'Rocoto Longo' (which was developed in the Canary Islands).</div> <div> </div> <div><span style="font-size: 12pt;"><strong>30.000 - 50.000 SHU</strong></span></div>
C 3 O (5 S)
Rocoto Manzano Seeds
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Montserrat Tomato Seeds 1.95 - 1

Spanish tomato seeds...

Regular price 1,95 € -15% Ár 1,66 € (SKU: VT 20)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Montserrat Tomato Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Montserrat tomato is one of the best and most expensive tomatoes sold freshly, it is mainly sold in Catalonia where it is a delicacy. They are also called "rose tomatoes", as when they are cut up they are reminiscent of a rose. These beefsteak tomatoes are flat-round and ribbed, ripen from yellow/pink to red and can weigh up to 200 g. The fruit flesh is very flavourful and slightly sweet. As these tomatoes have cavities, they are particularly suitable for stuffing, but can also be enjoyed in a fresh salad.<span>&nbsp;</span><span><br></span></p> <p><strong>Care:</strong><span>&nbsp;</span>You can grow the Montserrat tomatoes inside the house, in a greenhouse or outdoors. The optimal germination temperature is between 20 and 25°C, and germination occurs after 8 - 14 days. You can speed up the germination process if you leave the seeds to soak overnight in a damp cloth. You should wait until after the last frost to plant your chosen plants.</p> <p>Tomatoes need fresh, well-fertilised, permeable soil which is kept moist (but not wet!). They should be planted in a sunny, protected place with at least 6 hours of sunlight - preferably more.</p> <table border="0" style="height: 180px;"> <tbody> <tr style="height: 18px;"> <td style="height: 18px; width: 237px;">Type</td> <td style="height: 18px; width: 402px;">Montserrat&nbsp;Tomatoes</td> </tr> <tr style="height: 18px;"> <td style="height: 18px; width: 237px;">Optimal germination temperature</td> <td style="height: 18px; width: 402px;">20 - 25 °C</td> </tr> <tr style="height: 18px;"> <td style="height: 18px; width: 237px;">Sowing</td> <td style="height: 18px; width: 402px;">February - April</td> </tr> <tr style="height: 18px;"> <td style="height: 18px; width: 237px;">Germination period</td> <td style="height: 18px; width: 402px;">8 - 14 days</td> </tr> <tr style="height: 18px;"> <td style="height: 18px; width: 237px;">Plant growth habit</td> <td style="height: 18px; width: 402px;">approx. 150 - 200 cm in height, stake tomatoes</td> </tr> <tr style="height: 18px;"> <td style="height: 18px; width: 237px;">Fruit appearance</td> <td style="height: 18px; width: 402px;">red, flat-round, broadly ribbed, approx. 150-200g</td> </tr> <tr style="height: 18px;"> <td style="height: 18px; width: 237px;">Taste</td> <td style="height: 18px; width: 402px;">very flavourful, slightly sweet</td> </tr> <tr style="height: 18px;"> <td style="height: 18px; width: 237px;">Harvest</td> <td style="height: 18px; width: 402px;">from the beginning of August until the end of September</td> </tr> <tr style="height: 18px;"> <td style="height: 18px; width: 237px;">Origin</td> <td style="height: 18px; width: 402px;">Spain</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 20 (10 S)
Montserrat Tomato Seeds 1.95 - 1
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Óriás növény (óriás gyümölcsökkel)

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Tres Cantos Beefsteak...

Tres Cantos Beefsteak...

Regular price 1,95 € -15% Ár 1,66 € (SKU: VT 42)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Tres Cantos tomato seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The Tres Cantos tomato is an heirloom from Tenerife. The name translates ‘Three Songs’ from Spanish. Indeterminate, regular leaf plant produces large amounts of 500 g, round, juicy, red tomatoes with bold, slightly-acidic, tomatoey flavors. Perfect choice for salads, canning, and market.</p> <p>The beefsteak tomatoes are juicy with few seeds. Their flavor is excellent, savory with a great balance of acidic and sweet. The plants are strong growing, prolific and will need tall canes for support. For best results in yield, remove side shoots and restrict the plant to one main stem. They are resistant to most tomato diseases.</p> <ul><li><strong>Type</strong>: Tres Cantos Tomato</li> <li><strong>Optimal germination temperature</strong>: 20 - 25 °C</li> <li><strong>Sowing</strong>: February - April</li> <li><strong>Germination period</strong>: 8 - 14 days</li> <li><strong>Plant height</strong>: approx. 150-180 cm in height, stake tomato</li> <li><strong>Fruit appearance</strong>: red, flat-round, 500 g, juicy beefsteak</li> <li><strong>Taste</strong>: aromatic, sweet and juicy</li> <li><strong>Harvest</strong>: from August to October</li> <li><strong>Origin</strong>: Tenerife / Spain</li> </ul>
VT 42 (10 S)
Tres Cantos Beefsteak Tomato Seeds
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Monte Rosa Ribbed Pink Tomato Seeds Seeds Gallery - 8

Monte Rosa Ribbed Pink...

Regular price 2,05 € -15% Ár 1,74 € (SKU: VT 92)
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5/ 5
<h2><span style="color: #000000;" class=""><strong>“Monte Rosa” Ribbed Pink Tomato Seeds</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #f40202;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds. &nbsp;</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Who am I? I am a new tomato variety I was born on a cool morning in June 2012 in Cabrera de Mar on the Maresme Coast (Catalonia – Spain). My mother is a pear tomato from Girona and my paternal grandfather is a Genovese Costoluto. This mixture of Catalan and Italian blood gives me a truly Mediterranean appearance.</span></p> <p><span>I was born both from the passion to enjoy the Mediterranean diet and from the commitment to recover old tomatoes. We believe that each tomato is an exceptional explosion of color and flavor.</span></p> <p><strong>Taste me and indulge yourself in my infinite nuances.</strong></p> <p><strong>Do not miss the experience!</strong></p> <p><strong>How am I?</strong></p> <p><span>I am asymmetric and ribbed, my skin is velvety and my sepals are very showy, which give me a lush and voluptuous appearance. From the apple green of my youth, I evolve to deep pink in my maturity and I exude a characteristic herbaceous aroma.</span></p> <p><span>The way I look is the prelude to many sensory attributes that will allow you to enjoy balanced and tasty tomatoes. Those who know me more highlight my sweetness and fruity finishing taste. Enjoy me and rediscover the pleasure of an intense garden tomato flavor, which will persist in your mouth and your memory.</span></p> <p><span>My flavor details make me the perfect ingredient to be part of those unforgettable dishes, prepared with love, and in which the delicacy and simplicity of natural ingredients predominate. However, without losing the properties of the tomatoes that enrich the Mediterranean diet the most.</span></p> <p><strong>Description:</strong></p> <p><span><strong>Height</strong>: a plant that can reach over two meters high, depending on the duration of the growth cycle.</span></p> <p><span>The first fruits will be completely ripe around 60 days after the plant is transplanted into the soil. The warmer the weather when the cycle starts, the faster they will ripen. In case the plant is sowed directly in soil (or kept in a pot), the first ripe fruits will be up for harvest in about 90 to 100 days after the seeds are sowed. The first fruits will be the largest ones, and can reach a weight of 400 grams and will be very ribbed.</span></p> <p><span>After that, the weight and size of the fruits will be reduced, to some extent. The warmer it is during the cycle, the faster tomatoes will ripen. If a recently-set fruit is removed (or any of its flowers) in one of the first vines, the result will be more and bigger tomatoes in the following vines, leveling the plant’s production throughout the cycle.</span></p> <p><span>The plant has a medium-high vigor, and thus, it is recommended to remove some stems in order to have enough light on the fruits. Removing stems reduces problems related to humidity (botrytis, etc.). A rich in calcium fertilizer is highly recommended, especially during extremely hot seasons.</span></p> <p><strong>This variety count on several resistances that make it suitable to be grown professionally:</strong></p> <p><strong>– Resistance to Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV)</strong></p> <p><strong>– Resistance to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV)</strong></p> <p><strong>– Resistance to Verticilium (Vd)</strong></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VT 92 (10 S)
Monte Rosa Ribbed Pink Tomato Seeds Seeds Gallery - 8
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