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Herb Dill Bouquet Seeds 1.6 - 4

Dill seeds (Anethum...

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<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Dill seeds (Anethum Graveolens)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 900 (2g), 4500 (10g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Dill</b><span> </span>(<i>Anethum graveolens</i>) is an<span> </span>annual<span> </span>herb<span> </span>in the celery family<span> </span>Apiaceae. It is the only species in the genus<span> </span><i>Anethum</i>. Dill is grown widely in<span> </span>Eurasia<span> </span>where its leaves and seeds are used as a herb or spice for flavouring food.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Growth">Growth</span></h2> <p>Dill grows up to 40–60 cm (16–24 in), with slender hollow stems and alternate, finely divided, softly delicate<span> </span>leaves<span> </span>10–20 cm (4–8 in) long. The ultimate leaf divisions are 1–2 mm (0.04–0.08 in) broad, slightly broader than the similar leaves of<span> </span>fennel, which are threadlike, less than 1 mm (0.04 in) broad, but harder in texture. The<span> </span>flowers<span> </span>are white to yellow, in small<span> </span>umbels<span> </span>2–9 cm (0.8–3.5 in) diameter. The<span> </span>seeds<span> </span>are 4–5 mm (0.16–0.20 in) long and 1 mm (0.04 in) thick, and straight to slightly curved with a longitudinally ridged surface.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Etymology">Etymology</span></h2> <p>The word<span> </span><i>dill</i><span> </span>and its close relatives are found in most of the Germanic languages; its ultimate origin is unknown.<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference">[3]</sup><span> </span>The generic name<span> </span><i>Anethum</i><span> </span>is the<span> </span>Latin<span> </span>form of<span> </span>Greek<span> </span>ἄνῑσον / ἄνησον / ἄνηθον / ἄνητον, which meant both 'dill' and 'anise'. The form<span> </span><i>anīsum</i><span> </span>came to be used for anise, and<span> </span><i>anēthum</i><span> </span>for dill. The Latin word is the origin of dill's names in the<span> </span>Western Romance languages<span> </span>(<i>anet</i>,<span> </span><i>aneldo</i>, etc.), and also of the obsolete English<span> </span><i>anet</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>Most<span> </span>Slavic language<span> </span>names come from<span> </span>Proto-Slavic<span> </span><i>*koprъ</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup><span> </span>which developed from the<span> </span>PIE<span> </span>root *<i>ku̯ə<sub>1</sub>po-</i><span> </span>'aroma, odor'.<sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="History">History</span></h2> <p>Dill has been found in the tomb of Egyptian Pharaoh<span> </span>Amenhotep II, dating to around 1400 BC.<sup id="cite_ref-pickersgill_7-0" class="reference">[7]</sup><span> </span>It was also later found in the Greek city of<span> </span>Samos, around the 7th century BC, and mentioned in the writings of<span> </span>Theophrastus<span> </span>(371–287 BC).<sup id="cite_ref-pickersgill_7-1" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_use">Culinary use</span></h2> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Dill weed, fresh</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>180 kJ (43 kcal)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>7 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>2.1 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>1.1 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>3.5 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Vitamins</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin A</th> <td>7717 (154%) IU</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine (B<span>1</span>)</th> <td> <div>9%</div> 0.1 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin (B<span>2</span>)</th> <td> <div>25%</div> 0.3 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Niacin (B<span>3</span>)</th> <td> <div>11%</div> 1.6 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Pantothenic acid (B<span>5</span>)</th> <td> <div>8%</div> 0.4 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>6</span></th> <td> <div>15%</div> 0.2 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Folate (B<span>9</span>)</th> <td> <div>38%</div> 150 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>12</span></th> <td> <div>0%</div> 0 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>102%</div> 85 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Minerals</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>21%</div> 208 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>51%</div> 6.6 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>15%</div> 55 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Manganese</th> <td> <div>62%</div> 1.3 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>9%</div> 66 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>16%</div> 738 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sodium</th> <td> <div>4%</div> 61 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Zinc</th> <td> <div>9%</div> 0.9 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Other constituents</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Copper<span> </span>667</th> <td>0.14 mg (7%)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg =<span> </span>micrograms • mg =<span> </span>milligrams</li> <li>IU =<span> </span>International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap"><sup>†</sup>Percentages are roughly approximated using<span> </span>US recommendations<span> </span>for adults.<br /><span class="nowrap">Source:<span> </span>USDA Nutrient Database</span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Dill seeds (Anethum Graveolens)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5b/DillEssOil.png/170px-DillEssOil.png" decoding="async" width="170" height="254" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5b/DillEssOil.png/255px-DillEssOil.png 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5b/DillEssOil.png/340px-DillEssOil.png 2x" data-file-width="857" data-file-height="1280" title="Dill seeds (Anethum Graveolens)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Dill (<i>Anethum graveolens</i>) essential oil in clear glass vial</div> </div> </div> <p>Fresh and dried dill leaves (sometimes called "<b>dill weed</b>" or "<b>dillweed</b>" to distinguish it from dill seed) are widely used as<span> </span>herbs<span> </span>in<span> </span>Europe<span> </span>and central Asia.</p> <p>Like<span> </span>caraway, the fernlike leaves of dill are aromatic and are used to flavor many<span> </span>foods<span> </span>such as<span> </span>gravlax<span> </span>(cured<span> </span>salmon) and other<span> </span>fish<span> </span>dishes,<span> </span>borscht, and other<span> </span>soups, as well as<span> </span>pickles<span> </span>(where the dill flower is sometimes used). Dill is best when used fresh, as it loses its flavor rapidly if dried, however,<span> </span>freeze-dried<span> </span>dill leaves retain their flavor relatively well for a few months.</p> <p>Dill oil<span> </span>is extracted from the leaves, stems, and seeds of the plant. The oil from the seeds is distilled and used in the manufacturing of soaps.<sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <p>Dill is the<span> </span>eponymous<span> </span>ingredient in dill<span> </span>pickles.<sup id="cite_ref-9" class="reference"></sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="European_cuisine">European cuisine</span></h3> <p>In<span> </span>central<span> </span>and<span> </span>eastern Europe,<span> </span>Scandinavia,<span> </span>Baltic states,<span> </span>Ukraine, and<span> </span>Russia, dill is a staple<span> </span>culinary herb<span> </span>along with<span> </span>chives<span> </span>and<span> </span>parsley. Fresh, finely cut dill leaves are used as a topping in soups, especially the hot red<span> </span>borsht<span> </span>and the cold borsht mixed with curds, kefir, yogurt, or sour cream, which is served during hot summer weather and is called<span> </span>okroshka. It also is popular in summer to drink fermented milk (curds, kefir, yogurt, or buttermilk) mixed with dill (and sometimes other herbs).</p> <p>In the same way, dill is used as a topping for boiled potatoes covered with fresh butter – especially in summer when there are so-called "new", or young, potatoes. The dill leaves may be mixed with butter, making a dill butter, to serve the same purpose. Dill leaves mixed with<span> </span>tvorog, form one of the traditional cheese spreads used for sandwiches. Fresh dill leaves are used throughout the year as an ingredient in salads,<span> </span><i>e.g.</i>, one made of lettuce, fresh cucumbers, and tomatoes, as<span> </span>basil<span> </span>leaves are used in Italy and Greece.</p> <p>Russian cuisine<span> </span>is noted for liberal use of dill, where it is known as<span> </span><i lang="ru" title="Russian language text">укроп</i>. Its supposed<span> </span>antiflatulent<span> </span>activity caused some Russian cosmonauts to recommend its use in<span> </span>human spaceflight<span> </span>due to the confined quarters and closed air supply.<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <p>In<span> </span>Polish cuisine, fresh dill leaves mixed with sour cream are the basis for dressings. It is especially popular to use this kind of sauce with freshly cut cucumbers, which practically are wholly immersed in the sauce, making a salad called<span> </span>mizeria. Dill sauce is used hot for baked freshwater fish and for chicken or turkey breast, or used hot or cold for hard-boiled eggs. A dill-based soup, (zupa koperkowa), served with potatoes and hard-boiled eggs, is popular in Poland. Whole stems including roots and flower buds are used traditionally to prepare Polish-style pickled cucumbers (ogórki kiszone), especially the so-called low-salt cucumbers ("ogórki małosolne"). Whole stems of dill (often including the roots) also are cooked with potatoes, especially the potatoes of autumn and winter, so they resemble the flavor of the newer potatoes found in summer. Some kinds of fish, especially trout and salmon, traditionally are baked with the stems and leaves of dill.</p> <p>In the<span> </span>Czech Republic, white dill sauce made of cream (or milk), butter, flour, vinegar, and dill is called<span> </span><i>koprová omáčka</i><span> </span>(also<span> </span><i>koprovka</i><span> </span>or<span> </span><i>kopračka</i>) and is served either with boiled eggs and potatoes, or with dumplings and boiled beef. Another Czech dish with dill is a soup called,<span> </span><i>kulajda</i>, that contains mushrooms (traditionally wild ones).</p> <p>In Germany, dill is popular as a seasoning for fish and many other dishes, chopped as a garnish on potatoes, and as a flavoring in pickles.</p> <p>In the UK, dill may be used in<span> </span>fish pie.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Bulgaria<span> </span>dill is widely used in traditional vegetable salads, and most notably the yogurt-based cold soup<span> </span>Tarator. It is also used in the preparation of sour pickles, cabbage, and other dishes.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Romania<span> </span>dill (<i>mărar</i>) is widely used as an ingredient for soups such as<span> </span><i>borş</i><span> </span>(pronounced "borsh"), pickles, and other dishes, especially those based on peas, beans, and cabbage. It is popular for dishes based on potatoes and mushrooms and may be found in many summer salads (especially cucumber salad, cabbage salad and lettuce salad). During springtime, it is used in omelets with spring onions. It often complements sauces based on sour cream or yogurt and is mixed with salted cheese and used as a filling. Another popular dish with dill as a main ingredient is dill sauce, which is served with eggs and fried sausages.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Hungary, dill is very widely used. It is popular as a sauce or filling, and mixed with a type of cottage cheese. Dill is also used for<span> </span>pickling<span> </span>and in salads. The Hungarian name for dill is<span> </span><i>kapor</i>.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Serbia, dill is known as<span> </span><i>mirodjija</i><span> </span>and is used as an addition to soups, potato and cucumber salads, and French fries. It features in the Serbian proverb, "бити мирођија у свакој чорби" /biti mirodjija u svakoj čorbi/ (to be a dill in every soup), which corresponds to the English proverb "to have a finger in every pie".</p> <p>In<span> </span>Greece, dill is known as 'άνηθος' (anithos). In antiquity it was used as an ingredient in wines that were called "anithites oinos" (wine with anithos-dill). In modern days, dill is used in salads, soups, sauces, and fish and vegetable dishes.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Santa Maria,<span> </span>Azores, dill (<i>endro</i>) is the most important ingredient of the traditional Holy Ghost soup (<i>sopa do Espírito Santo</i>). Dill is found ubiquitously in Santa Maria, yet curiously, is rare in the other Azorean Islands.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Sweden, dill is a common spice or herb. The top of fully grown dill is called<span> </span><i>krondill</i><span> </span>(English: Crown dill); this is used when cooking<span> </span>crayfish. The<span> </span><i>krondill</i><span> </span>is put into the water after the crayfish is boiled, but still in hot and salt water. Then the entire dish is refrigerated for at least 24 hours before being served (with toasted bread and butter).<span> </span><i>Krondill</i><span> </span>also is used for<span> </span>cucumber<span> </span>pickles. Small cucumbers, sliced or not, are put into a solution of hot water, mild acetic<span> </span>white vinegar<span> </span>(made from vodka, not wine), sugar, and<span> </span><i>krondill</i>. After a month or two of fermentation, the cucumber pickles are ready to eat, for instance, with pork, brown sauce, and potatoes, as a "sweetener". The thinner part of dill and young plants may be used with boiled fresh potatoes (especially the first potatoes of the year, "new potatoes", which usually are small and have a very thin skin). In salads it is used together with, or instead, of other green herbs, such as<span> </span>parsley,<span> </span>chives, and<span> </span>basil. It often is paired up with chives when used in food. Dill often is used to flavor fish and seafood in Sweden, for example, gravlax and various herring pickles, among them the traditional,<span> </span><b>sill i dill</b><span> </span>(literally "herring in dill"). In contrast to the various fish dishes flavored with dill, there is also a traditional Swedish dish called, dillkött, which is a meaty stew flavored with dill. The dish commonly contains pieces of veal or lamb that are boiled until tender and then served together with a vinegary dill sauce. Dill seeds may be used in breads or<span> </span>akvavit. A newer, non-traditional use of dill is to pair it with chives as a flavoring for potato chips. These are called "dillchips" and are quite popular in Sweden.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Asian_and_Middle_Eastern_cooking">Asian and Middle Eastern cooking</span></h3> <table class="wikitable"> <tbody> <tr> <td>Nation/Region</td> <td>Language</td> <td>Local Name of Ingredient (Dill)</td> <td>Dish(es) Commonly Used In</td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Marathi, Konkani</td> <td>Shepu (शेपू)</td> <td>Shepuchi Bhaji, Shepu Pulao, Ashe Mast</td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Hindi</td> <td>Soa / Soya (सोआ)</td> <td>Soa Sabzi(with potato).As a flavor in:- Green Kheema, Kheema samosa</td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Kannada</td> <td>sabbasige soppu (ಸಬೈಗೆ ಸೊಪ್ಪು)</td> <td>Curry</td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Telugu</td> <td>Soa-Kura (శత పుష్పం)</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Tamil</td> <td>Sadakuppi (சதகுப்பி)</td> <td>Curry</td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Malayalam</td> <td>Chatakuppa (ചതകുപ്പ)</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Punjabi</td> <td>Soa</td> <td></td> </tr> <tr> <td>India</td> <td>Gujarati</td> <td>Suva</td> <td>Suvaa ni Bhaji(with potato)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Iran</td> <td>Persian</td> <td>Shevid</td> <td>Aash, Baghali Polo, Shevid Polo, Mast O Khiar</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Arab world</td> <td>Arabic</td> <td>شبت، شبث (shabat, shabath)</td> <td>As flavoring in various dishes</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Thailand</td> <td>Thai</td> <td>phak chee Lao(ผักชีลาว)</td> <td>Gaeng om(แกงอ่อม)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Vietnam</td> <td>Vietnamese</td> <td>Thì là</td> <td>Many fish dishes in Northern Vietnam</td> </tr> <tr> <td>China</td> <td>Chinese</td> <td>shiluo</td> <td>baozi</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In<span> </span>Iran, dill is known as<span> </span><i>shevid</i><span> </span>and sometimes, is used with rice and called<span> </span><i>shevid-polo</i>. It also is used in Iranian<span> </span><i>aash</i><span> </span>recipes, and similarly, is called<span> </span><i lang="fas-Latn" title="Persian-language romanization">sheved</i><span> </span>in<span> </span>Persian.</p> <p>In<span> </span>India, dill is known as "Sholpa" in Bengali,<span> </span><i lang="mar-Latn" title="Marathi-language romanization">shepu</i><span> </span>(शेपू) in Marathi and Konkani,<span> </span><i lang="hin-Latn" title="Hindi-language romanization">savaa</i><span> </span>in Hindi, or<span> </span><i lang="pan-Latn" title="Panjabi-language romanization">soa</i><span> </span>in Punjabi. In Telugu, it is called<span> </span><i>Soa-kura</i><span> </span>(for herb greens). It also is called<span> </span><i lang="kan-Latn" title="Kannada-language romanization">sabbasige soppu</i><span> </span>(ಸಬ್ಬಸಿಗೆ ಸೊಪ್ಪು) in<span> </span>Kannada. In<span> </span>Tamil<span> </span>it is known as<span> </span><i lang="tam-Latn" title="Tamil-language romanization">sada kuppi</i><span> </span>(சதகுப்பி). In<span> </span>Malayalam, it is ചതകുപ്പ (<i lang="mal-Latn" title="Malayalam-language romanization">chathakuppa</i>) or ശതകുപ്പ (<i lang="mal-Latn" title="Malayalam-language romanization">sathakuppa</i>). In Sanskrit, this herb is called<span> </span><i lang="san-Latn" title="Sanskrit-language romanization">shatapushpa</i>. In Gujarati, it is known as<span> </span><i lang="guj-Latn" title="Gujarati-language romanization">suva</i><span> </span>(સૂવા). In India, dill is prepared in the manner of yellow<span> </span><i>moong dal</i>, as a main-course dish. It is considered to have very good antiflatulent properties, so it is used as<span> </span><i>mukhwas</i>, or an after-meal digestive. Traditionally, it is given to mothers immediately after childbirth. In the state of Uttar Pradesh in India, a small amount of fresh dill is cooked along with cut potatoes and fresh fenugreek leaves (Hindi आलू-मेथी-सोया).</p> <p>In<span> </span>Manipur, dill, locally known as<span> </span><i lang="mni-Latn" title="Meitei-language romanization">pakhon</i>, is an essential ingredient of<span> </span><i lang="mni-Latn" title="Meitei-language romanization">chagem pomba</i><span> </span>– a traditional Manipuri dish made with fermented soybean and rice.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Laos<span> </span>and parts of northern<span> </span>Thailand, dill is known in English as Lao coriander (Lao:<span> </span><span lang="lo">ຜັກຊີ</span><span> </span>or<span> </span>Thai:<span> </span><span lang="th">ผักชีลาว</span>),<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup><span> </span>and served as a side with salad yum or papaya salad. In the<span> </span>Lao language, it is called<span> </span><i>phak see</i>, and in<span> </span>Thai, it is known as<span> </span><i>phak chee Lao</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference">[12]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup><span> </span>In<span> </span>Lao cuisine, Lao coriander is used extensively in traditional Lao dishes such as<span> </span><i>mok pa</i><span> </span>(steamed fish in banana leaf) and several coconut milk curries that contain fish or<span> </span>prawns.</p> <p>In<span> </span>China<span> </span>dill is called colloquially,<span> </span><i>huíxiāng</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">茴香</span>, perfums of Hui people), or more properly<span> </span><i>shíluó</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">莳萝</span>). It is a common filling in<span> </span>baozi<span> </span>and<span> </span>xianbing<span> </span>and may be used as vegetarian with rice vermicelli, or combined with either meat or eggs. Vegetarian dill baozi are a common part of a Beijing breakfast. In baozi and xianbing, it often is interchangeable with non-bulbing<span> </span>fennel<span> </span>and the term<span> </span><span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">茴香</span><span> </span>also may refer to fennel, similarly to caraway and coriander leaf, sharing a name in Chinese as well. Dill also may be<span> </span>stir fried<span> </span>as a potherb, often with egg, in the same manner as<span> </span>Chinese chives. It commonly is used in<span> </span>Taiwan<span> </span>as well. In Northern China,<span> </span>Beijing,<span> </span>Inner-Mongolia,<span> </span>Ningxia,<span> </span>Gansu, and<span> </span>Xinjiang, dill seeds commonly are called<span> </span><i>zīrán</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">孜然</span>), but also<span> </span><i>kūmíng</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">枯茗</span>),<span> </span><i>kūmíngzi</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">枯茗子</span>),<span> </span><i>shíluózi</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">莳萝子</span>),<span> </span><i>xiǎohuíxiāngzi</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">小茴香子</span>) and are used with pepper for lamb meat. In the whole of China,<span> </span><i>yángchuàn</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">羊串</span>) or<span> </span><i>yángròu chuàn</i><span> </span>(<span lang="zh" title="Chinese language text">羊肉串</span>), lamb<span> </span>brochette, a speciality from<span> </span>Uyghurs, uses cumin and pepper.</p> <p>In<span> </span>Vietnam, the use of dill in cooking is regional. It is used mainly in northern Vietnamese cuisine.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Middle_East_uses">Middle East uses</span></h3> <p>In Arab countries, dill seed, called<span> </span><i lang="ara-Latn" title="Arabic-language romanization">ain jaradeh</i><span> </span>(grasshopper's eye), is used as a spice in cold dishes such as<span> </span><i>fattoush</i><span> </span>and pickles. In Arab countries of the<span> </span>Persian Gulf, dill is called<span> </span><i>shibint</i><span> </span>and is used mostly in fish dishes. In<span> </span>Egypt, dillweed is commonly used to flavor<span> </span>cabbage<span> </span>dishes, including<span> </span><i>mahshi koronb</i><span> </span>(stuffed cabbage leaves).<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup><span> </span>In Israel, dill weed is used in salads and also to flavor omelettes, often alongside parsley. It is known in Hebrew as<span> </span><i lang="heb-Latn" title="Hebrew-language romanization">shammir</i><span> </span>(שמיר).</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p>Successful cultivation requires warm to hot summers with high sunshine levels; even partial shade will reduce the yield substantially.<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup><span> </span>It also prefers rich, well-drained soil. The seeds are viable for three to ten years.<sup id="cite_ref-16" class="reference">[16]</sup><span> </span>The plants are somewhat<span> </span>monocarpic<span> </span>and quickly die after "bolting" (producing seeds). Hot temperatures may quicken bolting.<sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference"></sup></p> <p>The seed is harvested by cutting the flower heads off the stalks when the seed is beginning to ripen. The seed heads are placed upside down in a paper bag and left in a warm, dry place for a week. The seeds then separate from the stems easily for storage in an airtight container.</p> <p>These plants, like their fennel and parsley relatives, often are eaten by<span> </span>Black swallowtail caterpillars<span> </span>in areas where that species occurs.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup><span> </span>For this reason, they may be included in some<span> </span>butterfly gardens.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Companion_planting">Companion planting</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Dill seeds (Anethum Graveolens)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/de/Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG/220px-Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG" decoding="async" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/de/Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG/330px-Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/de/Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG/440px-Anethum_graveolens_001.JPG 2x" data-file-width="1772" data-file-height="1329" title="Dill seeds (Anethum Graveolens)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Dill plants</div> </div> </div> <p>When used as a<span> </span>companion plant, dill attracts many beneficial insects as the umbrella flower heads go to seed. It makes a good companion plant for cucumbers and broccoli.</p> <p>It is a poor companion plant for carrots and tomatoes.</p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Cover lightly with substrate</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">min. 15 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">2-3 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> <div><span style="color: #008000;"><em> </em></span></div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </body> </html>
MHS 121 (2g)
Herb Dill Bouquet Seeds 1.6 - 4
15.000 Seeds Celery ''Utah'' 9.95 - 2

15.000 Seeds Celery ''Utah''

Price €9.95 (SKU: VE 180 (10g))
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>15.000 Seeds Celery ''Utah'' (apium graveolens)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong><span style="font-size: 14pt;">Price for Package of 15.000 seeds (10g)</span></strong></span></h2> <div>Crunchy, tender and string-less, this vigorous and popular green variety has thick, well-rounded 11” stalks and tightly folded hearts.  A late maturing variety, ideal for autumn use.</div> <div>Apium graveolens is a plant species in the family Apiaceae commonly known as celery (var. dulce) or celeriac (var. rapaceum), depending on whether the petioles (stalks) or roots are eaten: celery refers to the former and celeriac to the latter. Apium graveolens grows to 1 m tall. The leaves are pinnate to bipinnate leaves with rhombic leaflets 3–6 cm long and 2–4 cm broad. The flowers are creamy-white, 2–3 mm diameter, produced in dense compound umbels. The seeds are broad ovoid to globose, 1.5–2 mm long and wide.</div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">18 - 20°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">12°C: 32 Days</span><br /><span style="color: #008000;">20°C: 15 days</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
VE 180 (10g)
15.000 Seeds Celery ''Utah'' 9.95 - 2
Utah Celery Seeds (apium...

Utah Celery Seeds (apium...

Price €1.55 (SKU: MHS 135)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Celery ''Utah'' Finest Seeds (apium graveolens)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 1500 (1g) or 3000 (2g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Crunchy, tender, and string-less, this vigorous and popular green variety has thick, well-rounded 11” stalks and tightly folded hearts.  A late maturing variety, ideal for autumn use.</p> <p>Apium graveolens is a plant species in the family Apiaceae commonly known as celery (var. dulce) or celeriac (var. rapaceum), depending on whether the petioles (stalks) or roots are eaten: celery refers to the former and celeriac to the latter. Apium graveolens grows to 1 m tall.</p> <p>The leaves are pinnate to bipinnate leaves with rhombic leaflets 3–6 cm long and 2–4 cm broad. The flowers are creamy-white, 2–3 mm diameter, produced in dense compound umbels. The seeds are broad ovoid to globose, 1.5–2 mm long and wide.</p> </body> </html>
MHS 135 (1g)
Utah Celery Seeds (apium graveolens)

Giant plant (with giant fruits)
Celeriac Seeds Giant Prague

Giant Prague Celeriac Seeds

Price €1.25 (SKU: VE 16)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Giant Prague Celeriac Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2000 (1g), 20000 (10g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Well shaped smooth celeriac, vigorous roots, upright foliage. Round, relatively smooth skin with good inner quality. Suited to fresh market and storage.</p> <p><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></p> <p><strong>Site &amp; Soil</strong></p> <p>Celeriac has been bred from wild celery which originates from Northern Europe. They grow best in soil that has been fertilized the previous season and not the current season. Too much nitrogen in the soil from manure etc. will encourage leaf growth rather than growth of the bulbous root. </p> <p>The best soil is one that retains moisture but is also free-draining. Although those are the ideal conditions celeriac is very tolerant of soil conditions and will grow well on most sites. </p> <p>They prefer a site which is in full sun but will tolerate part-shade very well.</p> <p><strong>When to Sow</strong></p> <p>In cooler areas, sow indoors or in a greenhouse / cold frame. Sow two seeds to a small pot (7.5cm / 3in) in early March.</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">18 - 20°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">12°C: 32 Days</span><br /><span style="color: #008000;">20°C: 15 days</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
VE 16 (1g)
Celeriac Seeds Giant Prague
Black Caraway, Black Cumin Seeds (Nigella sativa) 2.45 - 1

Black Caraway, Black Cumin...

Price €2.15 (SKU: MHS 128)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Black Caraway, Black Cumin Seeds (Nigella sativa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 500 (1.5g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">You may or may not have heard of Black seed (nigella sativa) before. It goes by many names, including black caraway, Roman coriander, and black cumin, to name a few. But no matter what you call it, these seeds are loaded with health benefits that we are only beginning to understand. From eliminating harmful bacteria to regenerating the body’s cells and tissues, here are 10 awesome research-backed health benefits of black cumin.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Nigella sativa (black seeds), an annual flowering plant that grows to 20-30cm tall, is native to Asia and the Middle East. The flowers of this plant are very delicate and pale colored and white. The seeds are used in Middle Eastern cooking, such as in their local breads. The seeds are also used by thousands for their natural healing abilities.</span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>1.&nbsp;Type 2 diabetes –&nbsp;</strong>Researchers found&nbsp;that just two grams daily of black seed could result in reduced fasting blood sugar levels, along with decreased insulin resistance, and increased beta-cell function in the pancreas.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>2.&nbsp;Epilepsy –&nbsp;</strong>&nbsp;Published in&nbsp;<em>Medical Science Monitor</em><em>,&nbsp;</em>one study found black seed to be effective at reducing the frequency of seizures in children who resisted conventional treatment. Black seed indeed has anti-convulsive properties.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>3.&nbsp;Colon Cancer –</strong>&nbsp;In cell studies, black seed has been found to have anti-cancer properties, inhibiting the growth of colon cancer cells specifically. In&nbsp;one animal study, the seed was able to&nbsp;<strong>fight colon cancer in rats successfully with no observable side effects</strong>. The same obviously can’t be said for conventional cancer treatments.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>4.&nbsp;MRSA –</strong>&nbsp;The deadly and antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection known commonly as MRSA responded favorably to treatment with black seed in&nbsp;this study&nbsp;from the University of Health Sciences in Lahore, Pakistan.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>5.&nbsp;Protection Against Heart Attack Damage –</strong>&nbsp;An extract from black seed has been shown to possess&nbsp;heart-protective qualities, dampening&nbsp;damages associated with heart attacks and boosting overall heart health.</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Read:&nbsp;Health Benefits of 60+ Foods</strong></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>6.&nbsp;Breast Cancer –</strong>&nbsp;A few studies have linked a thymoquinone extract from nigella sativa to reduced breast&nbsp;cancer tumor growth&nbsp;and&nbsp;increased apoptosis&nbsp;(cell death) in breast cancer cells.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>7.&nbsp;Brain Cancer –</strong>&nbsp;A study published in the online journal&nbsp;<em>PLoS One</em>&nbsp;indicates thymoquinone from black seed can induce cell death in glioblastoma cells.&nbsp;<strong>Glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive brain tumors of all.</strong></span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>8.&nbsp;Leukemia –</strong>&nbsp;As it’s been shown to do with other types of cancer, black seed compound thymoquinone has also been shown to&nbsp;induce apoptosis&nbsp;in leukemia cells.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>9.&nbsp;Brain Damage from Lead –</strong>&nbsp;A study published in&nbsp;<em>Experimental and Toxicologic Pathology&nbsp;</em>&nbsp;indicates black seed is able to dampen and reverse damage to the brain sparked by lead toxicity.</span></li> <li><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>10.&nbsp;Oral Cancer –&nbsp;</strong>Research indicates&nbsp;thymoquinone from nigella sativa is able to induce cell apoptosis in oral cancer cells.</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">These ten benefits of nigella sativa are truly only the tip of the iceberg. Mounting evidence indicates this seed is a powerful healer.&nbsp;<strong>Stay tuned for Part 2 of this article where we’ll add to the list of benefits.&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Other Names:</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">Ajenuz, Aranuel, Baraka, Black Cumin, Black Caraway, Charnuska, Cheveux de Vénus, Cominho Negro, Comino Negro, Cumin Noir, Fennel Flower, Fitch, Graine de Nigelle, Graine Noire, Kalajaji, Kalajira, Kalonji, La Grainer Noire, Love in a Mist, Mugrela, Nielle, Nigella sativa, Nigelle de Crête, Nigelle Cultivée, Nutmeg Flower, Poivrette, Roman-Coriander, Schwarzkummel, Small Fennel, Toute Épice, Upakuncika.</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 128 (1,5g)
Black Caraway, Black Cumin Seeds (Nigella sativa) 2.45 - 1
Herb Caraway Seeds

Herb Caraway Seeds (Carum...

Price €1.85 (SKU: MHS 9)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Herb Caraway Seeds (Carum carvi) Meridian Fennel, Persian cumin</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 900 seeds (2g).</strong></span></h2> <div>One of the most popular herbs today, caraway has long been prized for the excellence of its aromatic dried seeds as a condiment, added to bread &amp; cheeses and an aid to digestion.  A hardy, biennial herb native to Europe and Western Asia growing 1 ½ ft  with attractive feathery leaves and white flowers from mid summer on the end of branches resembling carrot flowers. In the first year plants resemble carrots, growing to about 8 inches tall with finely divided leaves and long taproots, maturing and flowering in the second season.  The entire caraway plant is edible. The roots may be boiled and treated like cooked parsnips or carrots. The young leaves can be used in salads or for seasoning soups and stews. The licorice flavored seeds give ryebread its characteristic taste but are also good in potato soup, cheese spreads, sauerkraut and salad dressings. Several liqueurs are made with caraway, including Kummel and some Schnapps.</div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">18-20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">until it germinates </span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table>
MHS 9
Herb Caraway Seeds
Bolivian Coriander - Papalo Seeds (Porophyllum ruderale)

Bolivian Coriander - Papalo...

Price €2.25 (SKU: MHS 80)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong><em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">Bolivian Coriander - Papalo Seeds (Porophyllum ruderale)</span></em></strong></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p>Porophyllum ruderale is an herbaceous annual plant whose leaves can be used for seasoning food. The taste has been described as "somewhere between arugula, cilantro and rue."[1] The plant is commonly grown in Mexico and South America for use in salsas. When fully grown, this plant grows to about 5 feet in height and 3 feet in diameter.</p> <p>The plant is easy to grow from seed in a well drained soil, which should be allowed to dry between watering.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Culture</strong></p> <p>Having been used by many cultures, Porophyllum ruderale is known by many names, including Bolivian coriander, quillquiña (also spelled quirquiña or quilquiña), yerba porosa, killi, pápalo, tepegua, "mampuritu" and pápaloquelite. Despite the name "Bolivian coriander", this plant is not botanically related to Coriandrum sativum.</p> <p> </p> <p>This plant is known in Mexico as pápaloquelite, commonly accompanying the famous Mexican tacos. Not all Mexicans enjoy its taste, but some find that it improves the flavor of tacos and typical Mexican salsas and soups.</p> <p> </p> <p>In Puebla cuisine, pápalo is used as a condiment on traditional cemita sandwiches, a regional type of Mexican torta.</p> <p>Papalo was used in the Azteca era, but never as medicine, only as food.[citation needed]</p> <p>One study claims that Papalo exhibits some health benefits such as: lowering cholesterol, lowering blood pressure, and aiding digestion.</p> <p> </p> <table style="width:551px;" border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Instructions</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Propagation:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Pretreat:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Stratification:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Time:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Depth:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Sowing Mix:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Germination temperature:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">20-25°C</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Location:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Germination Time:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Watering:</span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><strong><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></strong></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap" width="26%"> <p><strong><span style="color:#008000;"> </span></strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="74%"> <p align="center"><br /><strong><span style="color:#008000;"> <em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></strong></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table>
MHS 80
Bolivian Coriander - Papalo Seeds (Porophyllum ruderale)
Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum...

Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum...

Price €2.05 (SKU: MHS 117)
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Coriander Seeds Herb (Coriandrum Sativum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 200 seeds (2g).</strong></span></h2> <p><b>Coriander</b><span> </span>(<span class="nowrap"><span class="IPA nopopups noexcerpt">/<span><span title="/ˌ/: secondary stress follows">ˌ</span><span title="'k' in 'kind'">k</span><span title="/ɒr/: 'or' in 'moral'">ɒr</span><span title="/i/: 'y' in 'happy'">i</span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="/æ/: 'a' in 'bad'">æ</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span><span title="'d' in 'dye'">d</span><span title="/ər/: 'er' in 'letter'">ər</span></span>,<span class="wrap"><span> </span></span><span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="'k' in 'kind'">k</span><span title="/ɒr/: 'or' in 'moral'">ɒr</span><span title="/i/: 'y' in 'happy'">i</span><span title="/æ/: 'a' in 'bad'">æ</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span><span title="'d' in 'dye'">d</span><span title="/ər/: 'er' in 'letter'">ər</span></span>/</span></span>;<sup id="cite_ref-epd_coriander_1-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span><i>Coriandrum sativum</i>) is an<span> </span>annual<span> </span>herb<span> </span>in the family<span> </span>Apiaceae. It is also known as<span> </span><b>Chinese parsley</b>, and in North America, the stems and leaves are usually called<span> </span><b>cilantro</b><span> </span>(<span class="nowrap"><span class="IPA nopopups noexcerpt">/<span><span title="'s' in 'sigh'">s</span><span title="/ɪ/: 'i' in 'kit'">ɪ</span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="'l' in 'lie'">l</span><span title="/æ/: 'a' in 'bad'">æ</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span><span title="'t' in 'tie'">t</span><span title="'r' in 'rye'">r</span><span title="/oʊ/: 'o' in 'code'">oʊ</span></span>,<span class="wrap"><span> </span></span>-<span><span title="/ˈ/: primary stress follows">ˈ</span><span title="'l' in 'lie'">l</span><span title="/ɑː/: 'a' in 'father'">ɑː</span><span title="'n' in 'nigh'">n</span></span>-/</span></span>).<sup id="cite_ref-epd_cilantro_2-0" class="reference"></sup><span> </span>All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds (as a<span> </span>spice) are the parts most traditionally used in cooking.</p> <p>Most people perceive the taste of coriander leaves as a tart, lemon/lime taste, but a smaller group of about 3–21% of people tested (depending on ethnicity) think the leaves taste like<span> </span>dish soap, linked to a<span> </span>gene<span> </span>which detects some specific<span> </span>aldehydes<span> </span>that are also used as odorant substances in many soaps and detergents</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Botanical_description">Botanical description</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7c/Coriandrum_sativum_003.JPG/225px-Coriandrum_sativum_003.JPG" width="225" height="225" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Flowers of<i><span> </span>Coriandrum sativum</i></div> </div> </div> <p>Coriander is native to regions spanning from<span> </span>Southern Europe<span> </span>and<span> </span>Northern Africa<span> </span>to<span> </span>Southwestern Asia. It is a soft plant growing to 50 cm (20 in) tall. The leaves are variable in shape, broadly lobed at the base of the plant, and slender and feathery higher on the flowering stems. The<span> </span>flowers<span> </span>are borne in small<span> </span>umbels, white or very pale pink, asymmetrical, with the petals pointing away from the center of the umbel longer (5–6 mm or 0.20–0.24 in) than those pointing toward it (only 1–3 mm or 0.039–0.118 in long). The<span> </span>fruit<span> </span>is a globular, dry<span> </span>schizocarp<span> </span>3–5 mm (0.12–0.20 in) in diameter. Pollen size is approximately 33 microns.</p> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/69/Coriander-2019-5-11_20-17-8-01.jpg/220px-Coriander-2019-5-11_20-17-8-01.jpg" width="220" height="292" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Coriander pollen</div> </div> </div> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Etymology">Etymology</span></h2> <p>First attested in English in the late 14th century, the word "coriander" derives from the<span> </span>Old French:<span> </span><i>coriandre</i>, which comes from<span> </span>Latin:<span> </span><i>coriandrum</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><span> </span>in turn from<span> </span>Ancient Greek:<span> </span><span lang="grc" xml:lang="grc">κορίαννον</span>,<span> </span><i>koriannon</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-5" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-6" class="reference">[6]</sup><span> </span>derived from<span> </span>Ancient Greek:<span> </span><span lang="grc" xml:lang="grc">κόρις</span>,<span> </span><i>kóris</i><span> </span>(a bed bug), and was given on account of its foetid, bed bug-like smell.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup><span> </span>The earliest attested form of the word is the<span> </span>Mycenaean Greek<span> </span><i><i>ko-ri-ja-da-na</i></i><sup id="cite_ref-8" class="reference">[8]</sup><span> </span>written in<span> </span>Linear B<span> </span>syllabic script (reconstructed as<span> </span><i><i>koriadnon</i></i>, similar to the name of<span> </span>Minos's daughter<span> </span>Ariadne) which later evolved to<span> </span><i>koriannon</i><span> </span>or<span> </span><i>koriandron</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-Chadwick_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>koriander</i><span> </span>(German).<sup id="cite_ref-spice_10-0" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <p><i><i>Cilantro</i></i><span> </span>is the Spanish word for coriander, also deriving from<span> </span><i>coriandrum</i>. It is the common term in<span> </span>North American<span> </span>English<span> </span>for coriander leaves, due to their extensive use in<span> </span>Mexican cuisine.<sup id="cite_ref-spice_10-1" class="reference">[10]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Origin">Origin</span></h2> <p>Although native to<span> </span>Iran,<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference">[11]</sup><span> </span>coriander grows wild over a wide area of Western Asia and Southern Europe, prompting the comment: "It is hard to define exactly where this plant is wild and where it only recently established itself."<sup id="cite_ref-ZoharyHopf_12-0" class="reference">[12]</sup><span> </span>Fifteen desiccated<span> </span>mericarps<span> </span>were found in the<span> </span>Pre-Pottery Neolithic B<span> </span>level of the<span> </span>Nahal Hemar<span> </span>Cave in<span> </span>Israel, which may be the oldest archaeological find of coriander. About half a litre of coriander mericarps was recovered from the tomb of<span> </span>Tutankhamen, and because this plant does not grow wild in Egypt, Zohary and Hopf interpret this find as proof that coriander was cultivated by the<span> </span>ancient Egyptians.<sup id="cite_ref-ZoharyHopf_12-1" class="reference">[12]</sup></p> <p>Coriander seems to have been cultivated in Greece since at least the second millennium BC. One of the<span> </span>Linear B<span> </span>tablets recovered from<span> </span>Pylos<span> </span>refers to the species as being cultivated for the manufacture of perfumes; it apparently was used in two forms: as a spice for its seeds and as a herb for the flavour of its leaves.<sup id="cite_ref-Chadwick_9-1" class="reference">[9]</sup><span> </span>This appears to be confirmed by archaeological evidence from the same period; the large quantities of the species retrieved from an<span> </span>Early Bronze Age<span> </span>layer at<span> </span>Sitagroi<span> </span>in<span> </span>Macedonia<span> </span>could point to cultivation of the species at that time.<sup id="cite_ref-13" class="reference">[13]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Uses">Uses</span></h2> <p>All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the parts most traditionally used in cooking, Coriander is used in cuisines throughout the world.<sup id="cite_ref-Samuelsson_14-0" class="reference">[14]</sup></p> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li class="gallerybox"> <div> <div class="thumb"> <div><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f8/Corriander_leaves-Cocunut_chutney.jpg/280px-Corriander_leaves-Cocunut_chutney.jpg" width="187" height="140" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /></div> </div> <div class="gallerytext"> <p>Coriander leaves in coconut<span> </span>chutney</p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p><span> </span></p> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li class="gallerybox"> <div> <div class="thumb"> <div><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e1/Minty_pani_puri.jpg/280px-Minty_pani_puri.jpg" width="187" height="140" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /></div> </div> <div class="gallerytext"> <p>Minty pani puri</p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p><span> </span></p> <ul class="gallery mw-gallery-packed"> <li class="gallerybox"> <div> <div class="thumb"> <div><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/be/Onion_Corriander_Paratha.JPG/280px-Onion_Corriander_Paratha.JPG" width="187" height="140" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /></div> </div> <div class="gallerytext"> <p>Onion coriander<span> </span>paratha</p> </div> </div> </li> </ul> <div></div> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Leaves">Leaves</span></h3> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/51/A_scene_of_Coriander_leaves.JPG/220px-A_scene_of_Coriander_leaves.JPG" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Coriander leaves</div> </div> </div> <p>The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, fresh coriander, dhania, Chinese parsley, or (in the US and commercially in Canada) cilantro.</p> <p>Coriander potentially may be confused with<span> </span>culantro<span> </span>(<i>Eryngium foetidum</i><span> </span>L.), an<span> </span>Apiaceae<span> </span>like coriander (<i>Coriandrum sativum</i><span> </span>L.), but from a different<span> </span>genus. Culantro has a distinctly different spiny appearance, a more potent volatile leaf oil<sup id="cite_ref-15" class="reference">[15]</sup><span> </span>and a stronger aroma.</p> <p>The leaves have a different taste from the seeds, with<span> </span>citrus<span> </span>overtones.<sup id="cite_ref-McGee_16-0" class="reference">[16]</sup></p> <p>The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many South Asian foods (such as<span> </span>chutneys<span> </span>and salads); in Chinese, Thai, and Burmese dishes; in Mexican cooking, particularly in<span> </span>salsa<span> </span>and<span> </span>guacamole<span> </span>and as a garnish; and in salads in Russia and other<span> </span>CIS<span> </span>countries. In Portugal, chopped coriander is used in the bread soup<span> </span>Açorda, and in India, chopped coriander is a garnish on Indian dishes such as<span> </span><i>dal</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-Moulin_17-0" class="reference">[17]</sup><span> </span>As heat diminishes their flavour, coriander leaves are often used raw or added to the dish immediately before serving. In Indian and Central Asian recipes, coriander leaves are used in large amounts and cooked until the flavour diminishes.<sup id="cite_ref-spice_10-2" class="reference">[10]</sup><span> </span>The leaves spoil quickly when removed from the plant, and lose their aroma when dried or frozen.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Seeds">Seeds</span></h3> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/86/Coriander_Seeds.jpg/220px-Coriander_Seeds.jpg" width="220" height="147" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Dried coriander fruits, often called "coriander seeds" when used as a spice</div> </div> </div> <p>The dry fruits are known as coriander seeds. The word "coriander" in food preparation may refer solely to these seeds (as a spice), rather than to the plant. The seeds have a lemony citrus flavour when crushed, due to<span> </span>terpenes<span> </span>linalool<span> </span>and<span> </span>pinene. It is described as warm, nutty, spicy, and orange-flavoured.</p> <p>The variety<span> </span><i>C. s. vulgare</i><span> </span>has a fruit diameter of 3–5 mm (0.12–0.20 in), while var.<span> </span><i>C. s. microcarpum</i><span> </span>fruits have a diameter of 1.5–3 mm (0.06–0.12 in). Large-fruited types are grown mainly by tropical and subtropical countries, e.g. Morocco, India, and Australia, and contain a low volatile oil content (0.1-0.4%). They are used extensively for grinding and blending purposes in the spice trade. Types with smaller fruit are produced in temperate regions and usually have a volatile oil content around 0.4-1.8%, so are highly valued as a raw material for the preparation of essential oil.<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup></p> <p>Coriander is commonly found both as whole dried seeds and in<span> </span>ground<span> </span>form. Roasting or heating the seeds in a dry pan heightens the flavour, aroma, and pungency. Ground coriander seed loses flavour quickly in storage and is best ground fresh. Coriander seed is a spice in<span> </span><i>garam masala</i><span> </span>and<span> </span>Indian<span> </span>curries which often employ the ground fruits in generous amounts together with<span> </span>cumin, acting as a thickener in a mixture called<span> </span><i>dhana jeera</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-19" class="reference">[19]</sup><span> </span>Roasted coriander seeds, called<span> </span><i>dhana dal</i>, are eaten as a snack. They are the main ingredient of the two south Indian dishes<span> </span><i>sambhar</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>rasam</i>.</p> <p>Outside of Asia, coriander seed is used widely in the process for<span> </span>pickling<span> </span>vegetables. In Germany and South Africa (see<span> </span><i>boerewors</i>), the seeds are used while making sausages. In Russia and Central Europe, coriander seed is an occasional ingredient in<span> </span>rye<span> </span>bread (e.g.<span> </span>Borodinsky bread), as an alternative to<span> </span>caraway. The<span> </span>Zuni people<span> </span>of North America have adapted it into their cuisine, mixing the powdered seeds ground with chili and using it as a condiment with meat, and eating leaves as a salad.<sup id="cite_ref-20" class="reference">[20]</sup></p> <p>Coriander seeds are used in brewing certain styles of beer, particularly some Belgian<span> </span>wheat beers. The coriander seeds are used with orange peel to add a citrus character. Coriander seed is one of the main traditional ingredients in the South African<span> </span>Boerewors, a spiced mixed-meat sausage.</p> <p>One preliminary study showed coriander<span> </span>essential oil<span> </span>to inhibit<span> </span>Gram-positive<span> </span>and<span> </span>Gram-negative bacteria, including<span> </span><i>Staphylococcus aureus</i>,<span> </span><i>Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa,</i><span> </span>and<span> </span><i>Escherichia coli</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-21" class="reference">[21]</sup></p> <p>Coriander is listed as one of the original ingredients in the<span> </span>secret formula<span> </span>for<span> </span>Coca-Cola.<sup id="cite_ref-22" class="reference">[22]</sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Roots">Roots</span></h3> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Coriander_roots.JPG/220px-Coriander_roots.JPG" width="220" height="148" class="thumbimage" title="Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)" /> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Coriander roots</div> </div> </div> <p>Coriander<span> </span>roots<span> </span>have a deeper, more intense flavor than the leaves, and are used in a variety of Asian cuisines, especially in<span> </span>Thai dishes<span> </span>such as soups or<span> </span>curry pastes.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutrition">Nutrition</span></h2> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Coriander (cilantro) leaves, raw</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>95 kJ (23 kcal)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>3.67 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sugars</th> <td>0.87</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>2.8 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>0.52 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>2.13 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Vitamins</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin A equiv. <div>beta-Carotene</div> <div>lutein<span> </span>zeaxanthin</div> </th> <td> <div>42%</div> 337 μg <div> <div>36%</div> 3930 μg</div> <div>865 μg</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine<span> </span><span>(B1)</span></th> <td> <div>6%</div> 0.067 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin<span> </span><span>(B2)</span></th> <td> <div>14%</div> 0.162 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Niacin<span> </span><span>(B3)</span></th> <td> <div>7%</div> 1.114 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Pantothenic acid<span> </span><span>(B5)</span></th> <td> <div>11%</div> 0.57 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>6</span></th> <td> <div>11%</div> 0.149 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Folate<span> </span><span>(B9)</span></th> <td> <div>16%</div> 62 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>33%</div> 27 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin E</th> <td> <div>17%</div> 2.5 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin K</th> <td> <div>295%</div> 310 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Minerals</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>7%</div> 67 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>14%</div> 1.77 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>7%</div> 26 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Manganese</th> <td> <div>20%</div> 0.426 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>7%</div> 48 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>11%</div> 521 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sodium</th> <td> <div>3%</div> 46 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Zinc</th> <td> <div>5%</div> 0.5 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Other constituents</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Water</th> <td>92.21 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><hr /> <div class="wrap">Link to USDA Database entry</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg =<span> </span>micrograms • mg =<span> </span>milligrams</li> <li>IU =<span> </span>International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap"><sup>†</sup>Percentages are roughly approximated using<span> </span>US recommendations<span> </span>for adults.<span> </span><br /><span class="nowrap"><span>Source: USDA Nutrient Database</span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Raw coriander leaves are 92% water, 4%<span> </span>carbohydrates, 2%<span> </span>protein, and less than 1%<span> </span>fat<span> </span>(table). The nutritional profile of coriander seeds is different from the fresh stems or leaves. In a 100 gram reference amount, leaves are particularly rich in<span> </span>vitamin A,<span> </span>vitamin Cand<span> </span>vitamin K, with moderate content of<span> </span>dietary minerals<span> </span>(table). Although seeds generally have lower content of vitamins, they do provide significant amounts of<span> </span>dietary fiber,<span> </span>calcium,<span> </span>selenium,<span> </span>iron,<span> </span>magnesium<span> </span>and<span> </span>manganese.<sup id="cite_ref-23" class="reference">[23]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Taste_and_smell">Taste and smell</span></h2> <p>The<span> </span>essential oil<span> </span>from coriander leaves and seeds contains mixed<span> </span>polyphenols<span> </span>and<span> </span>terpenes, including<span> </span>linalool<span> </span>as the major constituent accounting for the aroma and flavor of coriander.<sup id="cite_ref-24" class="reference">[24]</sup></p> <p>Different people may perceive the taste of coriander leaves differently. Those who enjoy it say it has a refreshing, lemony or lime-like flavor, while those who dislike it have a strong aversion to its taste and smell, characterizing it as soapy or rotten.<sup id="cite_ref-McGee_16-1" class="reference">[16]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-25" class="reference">[25]</sup><span> </span>Studies also show variations in preference among different ethnic groups: 21% of East Asians, 17% of Caucasians, and 14% of people of African descent expressed a dislike for coriander, but among the groups where coriander is popular in their cuisine, only 7% of South Asians, 4% of Hispanics, and 3% of Middle Eastern subjects expressed a dislike.<sup id="cite_ref-26" class="reference">[26]</sup></p> <p>Studies have shown that 80% of identical twins shared the same preference for the herb, but fraternal twins agreed only about half the time, strongly suggesting a genetic component to the preference. In a genetic survey of nearly 30,000 people, two genetic variants linked to the perception of coriander have been found, the most common of which is a gene involved in sensing smells.<sup id="cite_ref-27" class="reference">[27]</sup><span> </span>The gene,<span> </span><i>OR6A2</i>, lies within a cluster of olfactory-receptor genes and encodes a receptor that is highly sensitive to<span> </span>aldehydechemicals. Flavor chemists have found that the coriander aroma is created by a half-dozen or so substances, and most of these are aldehydes. Those who dislike the taste are sensitive to the offending<span> </span>unsaturated<span> </span>aldehydes and at the same time may be unable to detect the aromatic chemicals that others find pleasant.<sup id="cite_ref-28" class="reference">[28]</sup><span> </span>Association between its taste and several other genes, including a bitter-taste receptor, have also been found.<sup id="cite_ref-nature-soapy-taste_3-1" class="reference"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-29" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Allergy">Allergy</span></h2> <p>Some people are allergic to coriander leaves or seeds, having symptoms similar to those of other<span> </span>food allergies.<sup id="cite_ref-aip_30-0" class="reference">[30]</sup><span> </span>In one study, 32% of<span> </span>pin-prick<span> </span>tests in children and 23% in adults were positive for coriander and other members of the family Apiaceae, including<span> </span>caraway,<span> </span>fennel, and<span> </span>celery.<sup id="cite_ref-aip_30-1" class="reference">[30]</sup><span> </span>The allergic symptoms may be minor or life-threatening.</p>
MHS 117 (2g)
Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum)
Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)  - 2

Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)

Price €1.65 (SKU: MHS 129)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)</strong></h2> <h2 class=""><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 240 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Cumin (/ˈkjuːmᵻn/ or UK /ˈkʌmᵻn/, US /ˈkuːmᵻn/), sometimes spelled cummin, (Cuminum cyminum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native from the east Mediterranean to India.</p> <p>Its seeds (each one contained within a fruit, which is dried) are used in the cuisines of many different cultures, in both whole and ground form. It also has many uses as a traditional medicinal plant.</p> <p>Cumin is the dried seed of the herb Cuminum cyminum, a member of the parsley family. The cumin plant grows to 30–50 cm (12–20 in) tall and is harvested by hand. It is an annual herbaceous plant, with a slender, glabrous, branched stem that is 20–30 cm (8–12 in) tall and has a diameter of 3–5 cm (1 1⁄4–2 in).[9] Each branch has two to three sub-branches. All the branches attain the same height, therefore the plant has a uniform canopy.[9] The stem is coloured grey or dark green. The leaves are 5–10 cm (2–4 in) long, pinnate or bipinnate, with thread-like leaflets. The flowers are small, white or pink, and borne in umbels. Each umbel has five to seven umbellts.[9] The fruit is a lateral fusiform or ovoid achene 4–5 mm (1⁄6–1⁄5 in) long, containing two mericarps with a single seed.[9] Cumin seeds have eight ridges with oil canals.[9] They resemble caraway seeds, being oblong in shape, longitudinally ridged, and yellow-brown in colour, like other members of the Umbelliferae family such as caraway, parsley, and dill.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The English "cumin" is derived from the Old English, from Latin cuminum,[3] which is the Latinisation of the Greek κύμινον (kyminon),[4] cognate with Hebrew כמון (kammon) and Arabic كمون (kammūn).[5] The earliest attested form of the word in Greek is the Mycenaean.</p> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <h3 align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Sowing Instructions</span></h3> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Needs Light to germinate!</strong></span> Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">20-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap">&nbsp;</td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em></strong></span></p> <p align="center"><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><em></em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;">&nbsp;</span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 129 (1g)
Cumin Seed (Cuminum cyminum)  - 2
Samphire, Rock Samphire, Sea Fennel Seeds (Crithmum maritimum)

Samphire, Rock Samphire,...

Price €2.45 (SKU: MHS 109)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Samphire, Rock Samphire, Sea Fennel Seeds (Crithmum maritimum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for a package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Other Common Names: Samphire, sea samphire, sea fennel, rock fennel, crest marine, hinojomarino (Spanish), fenouil de mer (French), Meerfenchel (German), søfennikel (Danish), sanktpeterskjerm (Norwegian), saltmärke (Swedish). </span>Rock samphire can be found around the Mediterranean and the Black Sea, and along the Atlantic coast from the Canary Islands to northern France. The plant grows also along the west and south coast of Britain and Ireland. In recent years the species has spread and can now be found in the Netherlands, Belgium and even as far north as Norway.</p> <p><span>Its preferred habitat is rock crevices, cliffs, rocky shores and sometimes along shingle beaches. It grows best in sandy, well-drained soil. The plant does not tolerate shade and grows best in full sun. </span>Rock samphire is the only species in the Genus Crithmum and belongs to the carrot or parsley family (Apiaceae). It is a perennial, succulent plant that reaches 10-30 cm in height.</p> <p><span>The plant is smooth and richly branched with a stalk that is hard and woody at the base. The leaves are 2-3 times pinnate with linear to oblong, fleshy lobes. </span>The hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) flowers are greenish-yellow. The plant is in flower from July to August. It is pollinated by insects and it is self-fertile. The seeds are 3-5 mm long, ovoid or oblong, yellowish to purple and with ribs. The seeds ripen from August to October.</p> <p><span>Plant Parts Used: The above-ground parts of the plant are used as food and herbal medicine. </span>In spring, the young leaves and flowers can be collected from plants in good growth and used in salads or as vegetables.</p> <h2><strong><span>Health Benefits and Medicinal Applications of Rock Samphire</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Active Ingredients and Substances: The plant contains vitamin C (ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid), polyacetylenes (including falcarinol and falcarindiol), flavonoids (diosmin), furanocoumarins, pectin and the minerals zinc, iron, magnesium, iodine, and sulfates. </span>In addition, the essential oil extracted from the plant contains the substances geranyl acetate, dillapiole, sabin, limonene, thymol methyl ether and gamma terpinene.</p> <h2><strong><span>Herbal Medicine Uses</span></strong></h2> <p><span>Rock samphire is rarely used in today’s herbal medicine but some herbalists still use it for medicinal purposes and recommend it for a variety of ailments.</span></p> <p><span>The herb has diuretic properties and it is regarded as an appetite stimulant. Also, a strong extract made from the plant has been used traditionally as an herbal remedy for intestinal worms.</span></p> <p><span>Due to the plant’s high levels of vitamin C, it was once in much demand as a treatment for scurvy.</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>Crithmum</span></em></strong><span> is a </span><span>genus</span><span> of </span><span>flowering plant</span><span> with the sole species <strong><em>Crithmum maritimum</em></strong>, known as <strong>samphire</strong>,</span><span><strong> rock samphire</strong>,</span><span> or <strong>sea fennel</strong>.</span><span> Rock samphire is an edible wild </span><span>plant</span><span>. It is found on southern and western coasts of Britain and Ireland, on Mediterranean and western coasts of Europe including the Canary Islands, North Africa, and the Black Sea. "</span><span>Samphire</span><span>" is a name also used for several other unrelated species of coastal plant.</span></p> <h2><span>History, trade, and cultivation</span></h2> <p><span>In the 17th century, </span><span>Shakespeare</span><span> referred to the dangerous practice of collecting rock samphire from cliffs. <em>"Half-way down, Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade!"</em></span><span> In the 19th century, samphire was being shipped in </span><span>casks</span><span> of </span><span>seawater</span><span> from the </span><span>Isle of Wight</span><span> to market in London at the end of May each year.</span><span> Rock samphire used to be cried in London streets as "Crest Marine".</span></p> <p><span>In England, rock samphire was cultivated in </span><span>gardens</span><span>,</span><span> where it grows readily in a light, rich </span><span>soil</span><span>. Obtaining seed commercially is now difficult, and in the United Kingdom, the removal of wild plants is illegal under the </span><span>Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981</span><span>.</span></p> <p><span>The reclaimed piece of land adjoining </span><span>Dover</span><span>, called </span><span>Samphire Hoe</span><span>, is named after rock samphire. The land was created from spoil from the </span><span>Channel Tunnel</span><span>, and rock samphire used to be harvested from the neighboring cliffs.</span></p> <h2><span>Culinary use</span></h2> <p><span>Rock samphire has fleshy, divided </span><span>aromatic</span><span> </span><span>leaves</span><span> that </span><span>Culpeper</span><span> described as having a <em>"pleasant, hot and spicy taste"</em></span><span>The </span><span>stems</span><span>, leaves, and </span><span>seed pods</span><span> may be pickled in hot, salted, spiced </span><span>vinegar</span><span>, or the leaves used fresh in </span><span>salads</span><span>.</span></p> <p><span>Richard Mabey</span><span> gives several recipes for samphire,</span><span> although it is possible that at least one of these may refer to </span><span>marsh samphire or glasswort (<em>Salicornia europaea</em>)</span><span>, a very common confusion.</span></p>
MHS 109 (10 S)
Samphire, Rock Samphire, Sea Fennel Seeds (Crithmum maritimum)

Giant plant (with giant fruits)
FLORENCE Fennel Seeds large bulbs 1.85 - 3

FLORENCE Fennel Seeds...

Price €1.85 (SKU: VE 231)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>FLORENCE Fennel Seeds large bulbs</strong></h2> <h2><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;" class="">Price for Package of 250 (1g) seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Mid to late season fennel, well-known as a premium selection for its very large oval bulbs, average weight about 600 g, with thick, flavorsome sticks.</p> <p>Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) is a plant species in the genus Foeniculum (treated as the sole species in the genus by most botanists). It is a member of the family Apiaceae (formerly the Umbelliferae). It is a hardy, perennial, umbelliferous herb, with yellow flowers and feathery leaves. It is indigenous to the shores of the Mediterranean but has become widely naturalized in many parts of the world, especially on dry soils near the sea-coast and on riverbanks.</p> <p>It is a highly aromatic and flavorful herb with culinary and medicinal uses and, along with the similar-tasting anise, is one of the primary ingredients of absinthe. Florence fennel or finocchio is a selection with a swollen, bulb-like stem base that is used as a vegetable.</p> <p>Fennel is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the mouse moth and the anise swallowtail.</p> <p><strong>Etymology and names</strong></p> <p>The word "fennel" developed from the Middle English fenel or fenyl. This came from the Old English fenol or finol, which in turn came from the Latin feniculum or foeniculum, the diminutive of fenum or faenum, meaning "hay". The Latin word for the plant was ferula, which is now used as the genus name of a related plant.</p> <p><strong>Vernacular names</strong></p> <p>Fennel is known as सौंफ़ (Saunf) in Hindi. It is called பெருஞ்சீரகம் (perunjeeragam) in Tamil and പെരുംജീരകം (perumjeeragam) in Malayalam.</p> <p><strong>Cultural references</strong></p> <p>As Old English finule, fennel is one of the nine plants invoked in the pagan Anglo-Saxon Nine Herbs Charm, recorded in the 10th century.</p> <p>In Greek mythology, Prometheus used the stalk of a fennel plant to steal fire from the gods. Also, it was from the giant fennel, Ferula communis, that the Bacchanalian wands of the god Dionysus and his followers were said to have come.</p> <p>The Greek name for fennel is a marathon (μάραθον) or marathos (μάραθος),[3] and the place of the famous battle of Marathon and the subsequent sports event Marathon (Μαραθών), literally means a plain with fennels.</p> <p><strong>Appearance</strong></p> <p>Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare, is a perennial herb. It is erect, glaucous green, and grows to heights of up to 2.5 m, with hollow stems. The leaves grow up to 40 cm long; they are finely dissected, with the ultimate segments filiform (threadlike), about 0.5 mm wide. (Its leaves are similar to those of dill but thinner.) The flowers are produced in terminal compound umbels 5–15 cm wide, each umbel section having 20–50 tiny yellow flowers on short pedicels. The fruit is a dry seed from 4–10 mm long, half as wide or less, and grooved.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation and uses</strong></p> <p>Fennel is widely cultivated, both in its native range and elsewhere, for its edible, strongly flavored leaves and fruits. Its aniseed flavour comes from anethole, an aromatic compound also found in anise and star anise, and its taste and aroma are similar to theirs, though usually not as strong.</p> <p>The Florence fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Azoricum Group; syn. F. vulgare var. azoricum) is a cultivar group with inflated leaf bases which form a bulb-like structure. It is of cultivated origin,[7] and has a mild anise-like flavor, but is more aromatic and sweeter. Florence fennel plants are smaller than the wild type.[citation needed] Their inflated leaf bases are eaten as a vegetable, both raw and cooked. There are several cultivars of Florence fennel, which is also known by several other names, notably the Italian name finocchio. In North American supermarkets, it is often mislabelled as "anise".</p> <p>Foeniculum vulgare 'Purpureum' or 'Nigra', "bronze-leaved" fennel, is widely available as a decorative garden plant.</p> <p>Fennel has become naturalized along roadsides, in pastures, and in other open sites in many regions, including northern Europe, the United States, southern Canada and in much of Asia and Australia. It propagates well by seed and is considered an invasive species and a weed in Australia and the United States.[11] In western North America, fennel can be found from the coastal and inland wildland-urban interface east into hill and mountain areas, excluding desert habitats.</p> <p>Florence fennel is one of the three main herbs used in the preparation of absinthe, an alcoholic mixture which originated as a medicinal elixir in Switzerland and became, by the late 19th century, a popular alcoholic drink in France and other countries.</p> <p><strong>Culinary uses</strong></p> <p>Sugar-coated and un-coated fennel seeds are used in India and Pakistan in mukhwas, an after-meal snack and breath freshener.</p> <p>The bulb, foliage, and seeds of the fennel plant are widely used in many of the culinary traditions of the world. The small flowers of wild fennel (mistakenly known in America as fennel "pollen" [12]) are the most potent form of fennel, but also the most expensive.[13] Dried fennel seed is an aromatic, anise-flavored spice, brown or green in color when fresh, slowly turning a dull grey as the seed ages. For cooking, green seeds are optimal.[6] The leaves are delicately flavored and similar in shape to those of dill. The bulb is a crisp vegetable that can be sautéed, stewed, braised, grilled, or eaten raw. They are used for garnishes and to add flavor to salads. They are also added to sauces and served with pudding. The leaves used in soups and fish sauce and sometimes eaten raw as a salad.</p> <p>Fennel seeds are sometimes confused with those of anise, which are similar in taste and appearance, though smaller. Fennel is also used as a flavoring in some natural toothpaste. The seeds are used in cookery and sweet desserts.</p> <p>Many cultures in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, and the Middle East use fennel seed in their cookery. It is one of the most important spices in Kashmiri Pandit and Gujarati cooking.[15] It is an essential ingredient of the Assamese/Bengali/Oriya spice mixture panch phoron[16] and in Chinese five-spice powders. In many parts of India and Pakistan, roasted fennel seeds are consumed as mukhwas, an after-meal digestive and breath freshener. Fennel leaves are used as leafy green vegetables either by themselves or mixed with other vegetables, cooked to be served and consumed as part of a meal, in some parts of India. In Syria and Lebanon, it is used to make a special kind of egg omelette (along with onions, and flour) called ijjeh.</p> <p>Many egg, fish, and other dishes employ fresh or dried fennel leaves. Florence fennel is a key ingredient in some Italian and German salads, often tossed with chicory and avocado, or it can be braised and served as a warm side dish. It may be blanched or marinated, or cooked in risotto.</p> <p>In Spain the stems of the fennel plant are used in the preparation of pickled eggplants, "berenjenas de Almagro".</p> <p><strong>Medicinal uses</strong></p> <p>Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) essential oil in clear glass vial</p> <p>Fennel contains anethole, which can explain some of its medical effects: It, or its polymers, act as phytoestrogens.</p> <p>The essence of fennel can be used as a safe and effective herbal drug for primary dysmenorrhea, but could have lower potency than mefenamic acid at the current study level.</p> <p><strong>Intestinal tract</strong></p> <p>Fennel is widely employed as a carminative, both in humans and in veterinary medicine (e.g., dogs), to treat flatulence by encouraging the expulsion of intestinal gas. Anethole is responsible for the carminative action.</p> <p>Mrs. Eencher Herbal states:</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;On account of its carminative properties, fennel is chiefly used medicinally with purgatives to allay their side effects, and for this purpose forms one of the ingredients of the well-known compound licorice powder. Fennel water has properties similar to those of anise and dill water: mixed with sodium bicarbonate and syrup, these waters constitute the domestic 'gripe water' used to correct the flatulence of infants. The volatile oil of fennel has these properties in concentration. Commercial preparations of fennel [1] are widely available as an alternative treatment for baby colic.</p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Fennel tea, also employed as a carminative, is made by pouring boiling water on a teaspoonful of bruised fennel seeds.</p> <p>Fennel can be made into a syrup to treat babies with colic (formerly thought to be due to digestive upset), but long-term ingestion of fennel preparations by babies is a known cause of thelarche.</p> <p><strong>Eyes</strong></p> <p>In the Indian subcontinent, fennel seeds are also eaten raw, sometimes with some sweetener, as they are said to improve eyesight. Ancient Romans regarded fennel as the herb of sight.[21] Root extracts were often used in tonics to clear cloudy eyes. Extracts of fennel seed have been shown in animal studies to have potential use in the treatment of glaucoma.</p> <p><strong>Blood and urine</strong></p> <p>Fennel may be an effective diuretic and a potential drug for the treatment of hypertension.</p> <p><strong>Breastmilk</strong></p> <p>There are historical anecdotes that fennel is a galactagogue,[25] improving the milk supply of a breastfeeding mother. This use, although not supported by direct evidence, is sometimes justified by the fact that fennel is a source of phytoestrogens, which promote the growth of breast tissue. However, normal lactation does not involve growth of breast tissue. A single case report of fennel tea ingested by a breastfeeding mother resulted in neurotoxicity for the newborn child.</p> <p><strong>Other uses</strong></p> <p>Syrup prepared from fennel juice was formerly given for chronic coughs. It is one of the plants which is said to be disliked by fleas, and powdered fennel has the effect of driving away fleas from kennels and stables.</p> <p><strong>Parts Used:</strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;Seeds, leaves, roots, oil - the whole plant</p> <p><strong>Constituents:</strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;the essential oil is made up predominantly of anethole (50 to 80%), limonene, fenchone, and estragole. the seeds also contain fiber and complex carbohydrates.</p> <p>Fennel also acts as an excellent digestive aid to relieve abdominal cramps, gas and bloating. The fresh stems of fennel can be eaten much like celery, the seeds add a lovely anise flavor to fish and other dishes. If you expect to eat a vegetable that you have trouble digesting, like cabbage, try adding fennel seeds to your recipe.</p> <p>Fennel seeds (as well as anise) contain creosol and alpha-pinene, chemicals that help to loosen congestion and make coughs more productive. Fennel also calms the dry, hacking cough of bronchitis.</p> <p>The Greek name for fennel was marathon was derived from "maraino", to grow thin, reflecting the widely held belief that fennel affected weight loss, a belief that was echoed by William Coles, in "Nature's Paradise"</p> <p>both the seeds, leaves, and root of Garden Fennel are much used in drinks and broths for those that are grown fat, to abate their unwieldiness and cause them to grow more gaunt and lank.</p> <p>Fennel's ancient reputation as a weight loss aid still holds up today. Drinking a cup of fennel seed tea 15 minutes before eating a heavy meal seems to take the edge off your appetite. Fennel also tunes up digestion, helping to turn food into energy instead of fat.</p> <p>Women who are going through menopause or are experiencing menstrual problems may benefit from the estrogenic properties of fennel. It has a balancing effect on the female reproductive system and increases the flow of body energy. Extracts of fennel have estrogenic properties that may benefit women going through the hormonal imbalances caused by menopause.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span><strong>Sow fennel seed directly into the ground in spring when the ground is warm and thin plants to 12-18 inches. Plants can also be propagated by division in spring. Fennel prefers moist but well-drained soil with a pH between 4.8 and 8.2.</strong></span></p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 231 (1g)
FLORENCE Fennel Seeds large bulbs 1.85 - 3
Long White Smooth Parsnip 10.000 Seeds

10.000 Seeds Long White...

Price €10.00 (SKU: P 123 (20g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>10.000 Seeds Long White Smooth Parsnip</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package about 10,000 (20 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>One of the most popular and reliable varieties, producing Long rooted and broad shouldered roots making it suitable for almost all soil types.  A high yielder, it has good canker resistance and will deliver lots of fine, medium length, smooth skinned, high quality, fine flavoured parsnips.</div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">all year round </span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">3 cm</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">15-25 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">up to 3 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table>
P 123 (20g)
Long White Smooth Parsnip 10.000 Seeds
Long White Smooth Parsnip

Long White Smooth Parsnip

Price €1.95 (SKU: VE 30 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Long White Smooth Parsnip Organic Seeds (Pastinaca sativa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 150 (1g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div>One of the most popular and reliable varieties, producing Long rooted and broad shouldered roots making it suitable for almost all soil types. &nbsp;A high yielder, it has good canker resistance and will deliver lots of fine, medium length, smooth skinned, high quality, fine flavoured parsnips.</div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">all year round&nbsp;</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">3 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">15-25 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">up to 3 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span style="color: #008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em><em></em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 30 (1g)
Long White Smooth Parsnip
Berlin Parsley Root Seeds...

Berlin Parsley Root Seeds...

Price €1.95 (SKU: VE 24 (1,4g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Berlin Parsley Root Seeds (dual use)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 1000+ (1,4g)&nbsp;seeds.</strong><strong><br></strong></span></h2> <p>Dual-use variety. Delicious parsnip like roots. Full-flavored parsley leaves. Easy from seed. This species of parsley is widely grown in Europe and the Mediterranean but seldom seen in British gardens. One sowing in spring will provide all the parsley leaves you need for a whole season. Underground the plants produce a large parsnip like tap root identical to a parsnip.</p> <p>These roots are delicious roasted and have a unique flavor and can be used as you would parsnips. The roots can be left in the ground through winter.</p> <h2><strong>Wikipedia:</strong></h2> <p><b>Parsley</b><span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span><b>garden parsley</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Petroselinum<span>&nbsp;</span>crispum</i>) is a species of<span>&nbsp;</span>flowering plant<span>&nbsp;</span>in the family<span>&nbsp;</span>Apiaceae<span>&nbsp;</span>that is native to the central<span>&nbsp;</span>Mediterranean region<span>&nbsp;</span>(Cyprus, southern<span>&nbsp;</span>Italy,<span>&nbsp;</span>Greece,<span>&nbsp;</span>Portugal,<span>&nbsp;</span>Spain,<span>&nbsp;</span>Malta,<span>&nbsp;</span>Morocco,<span>&nbsp;</span>Algeria, and<span>&nbsp;</span>Tunisia), but has<span>&nbsp;</span>naturalized<span>&nbsp;</span>elsewhere in Europe, and is widely cultivated as an<span>&nbsp;</span>herb, a<span>&nbsp;</span>spice, and a<span>&nbsp;</span>vegetable.</p> <p>Where it grows as a<span>&nbsp;</span>biennial, in the first year, it forms a<span>&nbsp;</span>rosette<span>&nbsp;</span>of<span>&nbsp;</span>tripinnate<span>&nbsp;</span>leaves, 10–25&nbsp;cm (3.9–9.8&nbsp;in) long, with numerous 1–3&nbsp;cm (0.4–1.2&nbsp;in)<span>&nbsp;</span>leaflets<span>&nbsp;</span>and a<span>&nbsp;</span>taproot<span>&nbsp;</span>used as a food store over the winter. In the second year, it grows a flowering stem with sparser leaves and<span>&nbsp;</span>umbels<span>&nbsp;</span>with yellow to yellowish-green flowers.</p> <p>Parsley is widely used in<span>&nbsp;</span>European,<span>&nbsp;</span>Middle Eastern, and<span>&nbsp;</span>American cuisine.<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Curly leaf parsley</b><span>&nbsp;</span>is often used as a<span>&nbsp;</span>garnish. In<span>&nbsp;</span>central Europe,<span>&nbsp;</span>eastern Europe, and southern Europe, as well as in<span>&nbsp;</span>western Asia, many dishes are served with fresh green chopped parsley sprinkled on top.<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Flat-leaf parsley</b><span>&nbsp;</span>is similar, but it is easier to cultivate, and some say it has a stronger flavor.<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Root parsley</b><span>&nbsp;</span>is very common in central, eastern, and southern European cuisines, where it is used as a snack or a vegetable in many soups, stews, and<span>&nbsp;</span>casseroles.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Etymology">Etymology</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1a/Petersilie_ies.jpg/220px-Petersilie_ies.jpg" width="220" height="193" class="thumbimage"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Freeze-dried<span>&nbsp;</span>parsley showing name in German, Spanish and Greek on the label</div> </div> </div> <p>The word "parsley" is a merger of<span>&nbsp;</span>Old English<i><span>&nbsp;</span>petersilie</i><span>&nbsp;</span>(which is identical to the contemporary German word for<span>&nbsp;</span><i>parsley</i>:<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Petersilie</i>) and the<span>&nbsp;</span>Old French<span>&nbsp;</span><i>peresil</i>, both derived from<span>&nbsp;</span>Medieval Latin<span>&nbsp;</span><i>petrosilium</i>, from<span>&nbsp;</span>Latin<span>&nbsp;</span><i>petroselinum</i>,<sup id="cite_ref-1" class="reference">[1]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>which is the<span>&nbsp;</span>latinization<span>&nbsp;</span>of the<span>&nbsp;</span>Greek<span>&nbsp;</span>πετροσέλινον (<i>petroselinon</i>), "rock-celery",<sup id="cite_ref-2" class="reference">[2]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>from πέτρα (<i>petra</i>), "rock, stone",<sup id="cite_ref-3" class="reference">[3]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>+ σέλινον (<i>selinon</i>), "celery".<sup id="cite_ref-4" class="reference">[4]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Med_5-0" class="reference">[5]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Flora_6-0" class="reference">[6]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Mycenaean Greek se-ri-no, in<span>&nbsp;</span>Linear B, is the earliest attested form of the word<span>&nbsp;</span><i>selinon</i>.<sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference">[7]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/bf/Parsley100.jpg/220px-Parsley100.jpg" width="220" height="123" class="thumbimage"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Parsley leaves</div> </div> </div> <p>Garden parsley is a bright green,<span>&nbsp;</span>biennial<span>&nbsp;</span>plant<span>&nbsp;</span>in temperate climates, or an<span>&nbsp;</span>annual<span>&nbsp;</span>herb in<span>&nbsp;</span>subtropical<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>tropical<span>&nbsp;</span>areas.</p> <p>Where it grows as a biennial, in the first year, it forms a<span>&nbsp;</span>rosette<span>&nbsp;</span>of<span>&nbsp;</span>tripinnate<span>&nbsp;</span>leaves 10–25&nbsp;cm long with numerous 1–3&nbsp;cm leaflets, and a<span>&nbsp;</span>taproot<span>&nbsp;</span>used as a food store over the winter. In the second year, it grows a flowering stem to 75&nbsp;cm (30&nbsp;in) tall with sparser leaves and flat-topped 3–10&nbsp;cm diameter<span>&nbsp;</span>umbels<span>&nbsp;</span>with numerous 2&nbsp;mm diameter yellow to yellowish-green flowers. The<span>&nbsp;</span>seeds<span>&nbsp;</span>are<span>&nbsp;</span>ovoid, 2–3&nbsp;mm long, with prominent<span>&nbsp;</span>style<span>&nbsp;</span>remnants at the<span>&nbsp;</span>apex. One of the compounds of the essential oil is<span>&nbsp;</span>apiol. The plant normally dies after seed maturation.<sup id="cite_ref-Flora_6-1" class="reference">[6]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Blamey_8-0" class="reference">[8]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-Huxley_9-0" class="reference">[9]</sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Nutritional_content">Nutritional content</span></h2> <table class="infobox nowrap"><caption>Parsley, fresh</caption> <tbody> <tr> <th colspan="2">Nutritional value per 100&nbsp;g (3.5&nbsp;oz)</th> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Energy</th> <td>151&nbsp;kJ (36&nbsp;kcal)</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Carbohydrates</b></div> </th> <td> <div>6.33 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sugars</th> <td>0.85 g</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Dietary fiber</th> <td>3.3 g</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Fat</b></div> </th> <td> <div>0.79 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"> <div><b>Protein</b></div> </th> <td> <div>2.97 g</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Vitamins</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin A equiv. <div>beta-Carotene</div> <div>lutein<span>&nbsp;</span>zeaxanthin</div> </th> <td> <div>53%</div> 421 μg <div> <div>47%</div> 5054 μg</div> <div>5561 μg</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Thiamine<span>&nbsp;</span><span>(B1)</span></th> <td> <div>7%</div> 0.086 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Riboflavin<span>&nbsp;</span><span>(B2)</span></th> <td> <div>8%</div> 0.09 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Niacin<span>&nbsp;</span><span>(B3)</span></th> <td> <div>9%</div> 1.313 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Pantothenic acid<span>&nbsp;</span><span>(B5)</span></th> <td> <div>8%</div> 0.4 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin B<span>6</span></th> <td> <div>7%</div> 0.09 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Folate<span>&nbsp;</span><span>(B9)</span></th> <td> <div>38%</div> 152 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin C</th> <td> <div>160%</div> 133 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin E</th> <td> <div>5%</div> 0.75 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Vitamin K</th> <td> <div>1562%</div> 1640 μg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row"><b>Minerals</b></th> <td><b>Quantity</b><span><abbr title="Percentage of Daily Value"><b>%DV</b></abbr><sup>†</sup></span></td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Calcium</th> <td> <div>14%</div> 138 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Iron</th> <td> <div>48%</div> 6.2 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Magnesium</th> <td> <div>14%</div> 50 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Manganese</th> <td> <div>8%</div> 0.16 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Phosphorus</th> <td> <div>8%</div> 58 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Potassium</th> <td> <div>12%</div> 554 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Sodium</th> <td> <div>4%</div> 56 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <th scope="row">Zinc</th> <td> <div>11%</div> 1.07 mg</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"><hr> <div class="wrap">Link to USDA Database entry</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <div class="plainlist"> <ul> <li>Units</li> <li>μg =<span>&nbsp;</span>micrograms&nbsp;• mg =<span>&nbsp;</span>milligrams</li> <li>IU =<span>&nbsp;</span>International units</li> </ul> </div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" class="wrap"><sup>†</sup>Percentages are roughly approximated using<span>&nbsp;</span>US&nbsp;recommendations<span>&nbsp;</span>for adults.<span>&nbsp;</span><br><span class="nowrap"><span>Source:&nbsp;USDA Nutrient Database</span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Parsley is a source of<span>&nbsp;</span>flavonoids<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>antioxidants, especially<span>&nbsp;</span>luteolin,<span>&nbsp;</span>apigenin,<sup id="cite_ref-10" class="reference">[10]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>folic acid,<span>&nbsp;</span>vitamin K,<span>&nbsp;</span>vitamin C, and<span>&nbsp;</span>vitamin A. Half a tablespoon (a gram) of dried parsley contains about 6.0&nbsp;µg<span>&nbsp;</span>of<span>&nbsp;</span>lycopene<span>&nbsp;</span>and 10.7&nbsp;µg of<span>&nbsp;</span>alpha carotene<span>&nbsp;</span>as well as 82.9&nbsp;µg of<span>&nbsp;</span>lutein+zeaxanthin<span>&nbsp;</span>and 80.7&nbsp;µg of<span>&nbsp;</span>beta carotene.<sup id="cite_ref-11" class="reference"></sup></p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Precautions">Precautions</span></h3> <p>Excessive consumption of parsley should be avoided by pregnant women. Normal food quantities are safe for pregnant women, but consuming excessively large amounts may have<span>&nbsp;</span>uterotonic<span>&nbsp;</span>effects.<sup id="cite_ref-12" class="reference"></sup></p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation">Cultivation</span></h2> <p>Parsley grows best in moist, well-drained soil, with full sun. It grows best between 22–30&nbsp;°C (72–86&nbsp;°F), and usually is grown from seed.<sup id="cite_ref-Huxley_9-1" class="reference">[9]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Germination is slow, taking four to six weeks,<sup id="cite_ref-Huxley_9-2" class="reference">[9]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>and it often is difficult because of<span>&nbsp;</span>furanocoumarins<span>&nbsp;</span>in its<span>&nbsp;</span>seed coat.<sup id="cite_ref-Jett_13-0" class="reference">[13]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>Typically, plants grown for the leaf crop are spaced 10&nbsp;cm apart, while those grown as a root crop are spaced 20&nbsp;cm apart to allow for the root development.<sup id="cite_ref-Huxley_9-3" class="reference">[9]</sup></p> <p>Parsley attracts several species of wildlife. Some<span>&nbsp;</span>swallowtail butterflies<span>&nbsp;</span>use parsley as a host plant for their larvae; their caterpillars are black and green striped with yellow dots, and will feed on parsley for two weeks before turning into butterflies. Bees and other nectar-feeding insects also visit the flowers. Birds such as the<span>&nbsp;</span>goldfinch<span>&nbsp;</span>feed on the seeds.</p> <h3><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivars">Cultivars</span></h3> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6a/Parsley_Curled.jpg/220px-Parsley_Curled.jpg" width="220" height="216" class="thumbimage"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Parsley plant, crispum group</div> </div> </div> <p>In cultivation, parsley is subdivided into several<span>&nbsp;</span>cultivar groups,<sup id="cite_ref-14" class="reference">[14]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>depending on the form of the plant, which is related to its end use. Often these are treated as botanical<span>&nbsp;</span>varieties,<sup id="cite_ref-Petroselinum_crispum_15-0" class="reference">[15]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>but they are cultivated selections, not of natural botanical origin.<sup id="cite_ref-Blamey_8-1" class="reference">[8]</sup></p> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Leaf_parsley">Leaf parsley</span></h4> <p>The two main groups of parsley used as herbs are<span>&nbsp;</span><b>French</b>, or<span>&nbsp;</span><b>curly leaf</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>P. crispum crispum</i><span>&nbsp;</span>group; syn.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. crispum</i><span>&nbsp;</span>var.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>crispum</i>); and,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Italian</b>, or<span>&nbsp;</span><b>flat leaf</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>P. crispum neapolitanum</i><span>&nbsp;</span>group; syn.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. crispum</i><span>&nbsp;</span>var.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>neapolitanum</i>). Of these, the<span>&nbsp;</span><i>neapolitanum</i><span>&nbsp;</span>group more closely resembles the natural wild species.<span>&nbsp;</span>Flat-leaved parsley is preferred by some gardeners as it is easier to cultivate, being more tolerant of both rain and sunshine,<sup id="cite_ref-Stobart_16-0" class="reference">[16]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>and is said to have a stronger flavor<sup id="cite_ref-Huxley_9-4" class="reference">[9]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>— although this is disputed<sup id="cite_ref-Stobart_16-1" class="reference">[16]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>— while curly leaf parsley is preferred by others because of its more decorative appearance in<span>&nbsp;</span>garnishing.<sup id="cite_ref-Stobart_16-2" class="reference">[16]</sup><sup id="cite_ref-17" class="reference">[17]</sup><span>&nbsp;</span>A third type, sometimes grown in southern Italy, has thick leaf stems resembling<span>&nbsp;</span>celery.<sup id="cite_ref-Stobart_16-3" class="reference">[16]</sup></p> <h4><span class="mw-headline" id="Root_parsley">Root parsley</span></h4> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d5/Wurzelpetersilie_Wurzel.jpg/220px-Wurzelpetersilie_Wurzel.jpg" width="220" height="137" class="thumbimage"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Root parsley</div> </div> </div> <p>Another type of parsley is grown as a<span>&nbsp;</span>root vegetable, the<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Hamburg root parsley</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>P. crispum radicosum</i><span>&nbsp;</span>group, syn.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>P. crispum</i><span>&nbsp;</span>var.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>tuberosum</i>). This type of parsley produces much thicker<span>&nbsp;</span>roots<span>&nbsp;</span>than types cultivated for their leaves. Although seldom used in<span>&nbsp;</span>Britainand the United States, root parsley is common in<span>&nbsp;</span>central<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>eastern European cuisine, where it is used in<span>&nbsp;</span>soups<span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span>stews, or simply eaten raw, as a snack (similar to<span>&nbsp;</span>carrots).<sup id="cite_ref-Stobart_16-4" class="reference">[16]</sup></p> <p>Although root parsley looks similar to the<span>&nbsp;</span>parsnip, which is among its closest relatives in the family Apiaceae, its taste is quite different.</p> <h2><span class="mw-headline" id="Culinary_use">Culinary use</span></h2> <div class="thumb tright"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/20/%D8%B5%D8%AD%D9%86_%D8%AA%D8%A8%D9%88%D9%84%D8%A9.JPG/220px-%D8%B5%D8%AD%D9%86_%D8%AA%D8%A8%D9%88%D9%84%D8%A9.JPG" width="220" height="165" class="thumbimage"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Tabbouleh<span>&nbsp;</span>salad</div> </div> </div> <p>Parsley is widely used in<span>&nbsp;</span>Middle Eastern,<span>&nbsp;</span>European,<span>&nbsp;</span>Brazilian, and<span>&nbsp;</span>American<span>&nbsp;</span>cooking. Curly leaf parsley is used often as a<span>&nbsp;</span>garnish. Green parsley is used frequently as a garnish on potato dishes (boiled or mashed potatoes), on rice dishes (risotto<span>&nbsp;</span>or<span>&nbsp;</span>pilaf), on fish, fried chicken, lamb, goose, and<span>&nbsp;</span>steaks, as well in meat or vegetable stews (including shrimp creole,<span>&nbsp;</span>beef bourguignon,<span>&nbsp;</span>goulash, or<span>&nbsp;</span>chicken paprikash).<sup id="cite_ref-18" class="reference">[18]</sup></p> <p>In central Europe, eastern Europe, and southern Europe, as well as in western Asia, many dishes are served with fresh green, chopped parsley sprinkled on top. In southern and central Europe, parsley is part of<span>&nbsp;</span><i>bouquet garni</i>, a bundle of fresh herbs used as an ingredient in<span>&nbsp;</span>stocks,<span>&nbsp;</span>soups, and<span>&nbsp;</span>sauces. Freshly chopped green parsley is used as a topping for soups such as<span>&nbsp;</span>chicken soup, green salads, or salads such as<span>&nbsp;</span><i>salade Olivier</i>, and on<span>&nbsp;</span>open sandwiches<span>&nbsp;</span>with cold cuts or<span>&nbsp;</span><i>pâtés</i>.</p> <div class="thumb tleft"> <div class="thumbinner"><img alt="" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6f/Parsley_seeds%28%E0%A6%B0%E0%A6%BE%E0%A6%A7%E0%A7%81%E0%A6%A8%E0%A6%BF%29.JPG/220px-Parsley_seeds%28%E0%A6%B0%E0%A6%BE%E0%A6%A7%E0%A7%81%E0%A6%A8%E0%A6%BF%29.JPG" width="220" height="104" class="thumbimage"> <div class="thumbcaption"> <div class="magnify"></div> Parsley seeds</div> </div> </div> <p><i>Persillade</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is a mixture of chopped<span>&nbsp;</span>garlic<span>&nbsp;</span>and chopped parsley in<span>&nbsp;</span>French cuisine.</p> <p>Parsley is the main ingredient in Italian<span>&nbsp;</span>salsa verde, which is a mixed condiment of parsley, capers, anchovies, garlic, and sometimes bread, soaked in vinegar. It is an Italian custom to serve it with<span>&nbsp;</span>bollito misto<span>&nbsp;</span>or fish.<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Gremolata</i>, a mixture of parsley, garlic, and lemon zest, is a traditional accompaniment to the Italian veal stew,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>ossobuco alla milanese</i>.</p> <p>In England, parsley sauce is a<span>&nbsp;</span>roux-based sauce, commonly served over fish or<span>&nbsp;</span>gammon.</p> <p>Root parsley is very common in<span>&nbsp;</span>Central,<span>&nbsp;</span>Eastern, and<span>&nbsp;</span>Southern European<span>&nbsp;</span>cuisines, where it is used as a snack or a vegetable in many soups, stews, and<span>&nbsp;</span>casseroles, and as ingredient for<span>&nbsp;</span>broth.</p> <p>In<span>&nbsp;</span>Brazil, freshly chopped parsley (<i lang="pt" title="Portuguese language text" xml:lang="pt">salsa</i>) and freshly chopped<span>&nbsp;</span>scallion<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i lang="pt" title="Portuguese language text" xml:lang="pt">cebolinha</i>) are the main ingredients in the herb seasoning called<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="pt" title="Portuguese language text" xml:lang="pt">cheiro-verde</i><span>&nbsp;</span>(literally "green aroma"), which is used as key seasoning for major<span>&nbsp;</span>Brazilian dishes, including meat, chicken, fish, rice, beans, stews, soups, vegetables, salads, condiments, sauces, and<span>&nbsp;</span>stocks.<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="pt" title="Portuguese language text" xml:lang="pt">Cheiro-verde</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is sold in food markets as a bundle of both types of fresh herbs. In some Brazilian regions, chopped parsley may be replaced by chopped<span>&nbsp;</span>coriander<span>&nbsp;</span>(also called cilantro,<span>&nbsp;</span><i lang="pt" title="Portuguese language text" xml:lang="pt">coentro</i><span>&nbsp;</span>in Portuguese) in the mixture.</p> <p>Parsley is a key ingredient in several Middle Eastern salads such as Lebanese<span>&nbsp;</span><i>tabbouleh</i>; it is also often mixed in with the<span>&nbsp;</span>chickpeas<span>&nbsp;</span>and/or<span>&nbsp;</span>fava beans<span>&nbsp;</span>while making<span>&nbsp;</span>falafel<span>&nbsp;</span>(that gives the inside of the falafel its green color).</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
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Mitsuba Japanese Parsley Seeds (Cryptotaenia Japonica) 1.35 - 1

Mitsuba Japanese Parsley...

Price €1.95 (SKU: MHS 115)
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<h2><strong>Mitsuba Japanese Parsley Seeds (Cryptotaenia Japonica)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 50 (0,13 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Cryptotaenia japonica, commonly called Japanese parsley, Japanese honeywort or mitsuba, is an herbaceous perennial with foliage that somewhat resembles a flat-leaved parsley. It is native to moist woodland areas and ditches in eastern Asia. Branching stems of ternate compound leaves (mitsuba means three leaves in Japanese) with serrated ovate segments (each to 2-4" long) typically grow in an upright clump to 12-18" tall and as wide. Small white flowers in umbels bloom in summer on stems rising about 6" above the foliage. Seeds ripen in August-September. Plants are frequently used as culinary herbs in Asian cuisine. Leaves and stems are considered to have a parsley/celery-like flavor and may be added to soups, salads or other hot/cold dishes as a flavoring and/or garnish. Roots can be blanched and sauteed.</p> <p>Forma atropurpurea plants have ruffled purple-black foliage and stems which contribute significant ornamental interest to garden areas. Umbels of light pink to purple flowers bloom above the foliage in midsummer bringing plant height to 24" tall. Leaves typically lose sharp color intensity as the summer progresses. Culinary uses are the same as for species plants. Very closely related to Cryptotaenia japonica is the North American species Cryptotaenia canadensis, which is native from Quebec to Manitoba south to Georgia and Texas. In Missouri, it is found in rocky woods, ravines, valleys and along streams and bluff ledges throughout the State (Steyermark).</p> <p>Genus name comes from the Greek word cryptos meaning hidden and tainia meaning band, ribbon or fillet in probable reference to oil tubes hidden or concealed in the fruits.</p> <p>Specific epithet means of Japan.</p> <p><strong>Problems</strong></p> <p>No serious insect or disease problems. Watch for slugs and snails.</p> <p><strong>Garden Uses</strong></p> <p>Culinary herb for herb gardens. Purple foliage has good ornamental value for rock gardens, borders or shady areas of the landscape. Containers.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation details</strong></p> <p>Succeeds in most soils, preferring a moist shady position under trees where it often self-sows. The leaves tend to turn yellow when plants are grown in full sun. This species is not winter-hardy in all areas of Britain, though plants can tolerate short periods at temperatures down to -10°c. Mitsuba is commonly cultivated as a vegetable in Japan, there are some named varieties. It is usually grown as an annual. It is closely allied to C. canadensis, and is considered to be no more than a synonym of that species by some botanists[200]. This plant is adored by slugs and snails and must be protected when small or when new growth is emerging in the spring.</p>
MHS 115 (50)
Mitsuba Japanese Parsley Seeds (Cryptotaenia Japonica) 1.35 - 1