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Giant plant (with giant fruits)

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3

Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo...

Price €1.95 (SKU: B 6)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys bambusoides)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides, commonly called madake, giant timber bamboo or Japanese timber bamboo, is a bamboo species in the genus Phyllostachys.</p> <p>Madake is typically known for being the most common type of bamboo used in the making of shakuhachi flutes and is utilized in numerous Japanese, as well as Chinese, arts, and crafts.</p> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides can reach a height of 15–22 m and a diameter of 10–15 cm. The culms are dark green, quite thick and very straight. The leaves are dark green. New stalks emerge in late spring and grow quite rapidly, up to 1 meter each day. The flowering interval of this species is very long, about 120 years. This strong plant is in Asia one of the preferred bamboos for building and in the manufacture of furniture.</p> <p>This species is native to China, but it is commonly grown worldwide, especially in Japan.</p> </body> </html>
B 6 (5 S)
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3

Giant plant (with giant fruits)
Voacanga africana Seeds

Voacanga africana Seeds

Price €1.95 (SKU: MHS 69)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Voacanga africana Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><em>Voacanga Africana</em> is a tropical tree native to West Africa and is related to plants of the genus Tabernanthe or Iboga.</p> <p>Grows erect and robust usually reach a height of 3-4 meters and the bark is pale brown. Its leaves about 30 cm are bright, opposite and ovoid, with short petioles or absent. Its flowers are white or yellow, usually begin to bloom between February and April, fired a strong aroma and the fruit contains many brown seeds ellipsoids. The root is erect and branching. The fruit of Voacanga tends to occur during the summer months between June and September, depending on the country.</p> <p><strong>Effects and applications of Voaganca</strong></p> <p>At present the <em>Voacanga Africana</em> has industrial (production of latex) and medicinal applications. West African shamans used the bark of this tree as a brain stimulant, the roots were used as a stimulant during long hunts, while the seeds were used with visionary purposes.</p> <p>The seeds of the <em>Voacanga Africana</em> contain indole alkaloids, including voacangine (carbomethoxy-ibogaine), voacamina and related substances.</p> <p>Voacangine, C<sub>22</sub>H<sub>29</sub>N<sub>2</sub>O<sub>3</sub> (12-methoxyibogamine-18-carboxylic acid methyl ester) CAS: 510-22-5</p> <h2><strong>Cultivation of Voacanga africana</strong></h2> <p>In the tropical forest is preferably grown in rich soil and somewhat protected from the sun and frost places.</p> <p>The seeds must be sterilized water leaving 10 minutes with a 6% hydrogen peroxide. The use of a specific enraizador are advised to ensure germination.</p> <p>For planting it is best to use a mixture of sandy soil, and seeds bury about 8-10 mm deep (about twice the diameter of the seed). The soil should be kept moist but not waterlogged and the environment should be warm to promote germination.</p> <p>There must be good air circulation after germination to avoid fungal attacks.</p> <p>It likes partial sun until well established, then when they are more mature may be at more sunny places. After three or four months after germination, the plant will be established enough for transplant to their final location.</p> <p>The plant needs adequate space to develop its roots, so the planting distance is 3 meters between plants.</p> <p>Harvesting <em>Voacanga africana</em></p> <p>When the fruit is ripe, with a characteristic brown color, you can be cut directly from the ground without waiting for fall. After collecting the fruit bush, you need to be transported to where it can be left to mature. The fruit needs to mature in dry conditions.</p> <p>When the fruit is fully ripe it opens and you can see the seeds inside.</p> <p>When the fruit opens naturally, the seeds inside are extracted and begin to dry until they are loose, at which carried an open space until just dry. A separate dry powder and time when to be marketed is provided in an amount suitable for transportation profitable.</p> <p> Medicinal uses</p> <p>A number of these compounds have pharmaceutical uses.<sup>[3]</sup> Of particular pharmaceutical interest is voacangine, which is a common precursor in the semi-synthesis of the anti-addiction medication ibogaine. Small amounts of ibogaine are found in <em>Voacanga Africana</em> root bark but not in sufficient quantity to have much medicinal effect.</p>
MHS 69 (10 S)
Voacanga africana Seeds

This product is best seller product

Variety from Japan
Wasabi Seeds (Wasabia...

Wasabi Seeds (Wasabia...

Price €7.50 (SKU: MHS 4)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Wasabi Seeds (Wasabia japonica, Eutrema japonicum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Wasabi earlier Eutrema japonicum or Wasabia japonica is a plant of the Brassicaceae family, which includes cabbages, horseradish, and mustard. It is also called Japanese horseradish, although horseradish is a different plant (which is generally used as a substitute for wasabi, due to the scarcity of the wasabi plant). Its stem is used as a condiment and has an extremely strong pungency more akin to hot mustard than the capsaicin in a chili pepper, producing vapours that stimulate the nasal passages more than the tongue. The plant grows naturally along stream beds in mountain river valleys in Japan. The two main cultivars in the marketplace are E. japonicum 'Daruma' and 'Mazuma', but there are many others. &nbsp;The origin of wasabi cuisine has been clarified from the oldest historical records; it takes its rise in Nara prefecture.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>Wasabi is generally sold either as a stem, which must be very finely grated before use, as dried powder in large quantities, or as a ready-to-use paste in tubes similar to travel toothpaste tubes. Because it grows mostly submerged, it is a common misconception to refer to the part used for wasabi as a root or sometimes even a rhizome: it is in fact the stem[6][7] of the plant, with the characteristic leaf scar where old leaves fell off or were collected.</p> <p>In some high-end restaurants, the paste is prepared when the customer orders, and is made using a grater to grate the stem; once the paste is prepared, it loses flavor in 15 minutes if left uncovered.</p> <p>In sushi preparation, sushi chefs usually put the wasabi between the fish and the rice because covering wasabi until served preserves its flavor.</p> <p>Fresh wasabi leaves can be eaten, having the spicy flavor of wasabi stems.</p> <p>Legumes (peanuts, soybeans, or peas) may be roasted or fried, then coated with wasabi powder mixed with sugar, salt, or oil and eaten as a crunchy snack.</p> <p><strong>Surrogates</strong></p> <p>Wasabi favours growing conditions which restricts its wide cultivation. The resulting inability to be cultivated like other crops in order to fully satisfy commercial demand, thus makes it quite expensive. &nbsp;Therefore, outside Japan, it is rare to find real wasabi plants. Due to its high cost, a common substitute is a mixture of horseradish, mustard, starch and green food coloring or spinach powder. Often packages are labeled as wasabi while the ingredients do not actually include wasabi plant. Wasabi and horseradish are similar in taste and pungency due to similar isothiocyanate levels.</p> <p>&nbsp;The primary difference between the two is color with Wasabi being naturally green. In Japan, horseradish is referred to as seiyō wasabi (西洋わさび?, "western wasabi").</p> <p>&nbsp;In the United States, true wasabi is generally found only at specialty grocers and high-end restaurants.</p> <p><strong>Chemistry</strong></p> <p>The chemical in wasabi that provides for its initial pungency is the volatile allyl isothiocyanate, which is produced by hydrolysis of natural thioglucosides (conjugates of the sugar glucose, and sulfur-containing organic compounds); the hydrolysis reaction is catalyzed by myrosinase and occurs when the enzyme is released on cell rupture caused by maceration – e.g., grating – of the plant.[16][17][18] The same compound is responsible for the pungency of horseradish and mustard. Allyl isothiocyanate can also be released when the wasabi plants have been damaged, because it is being used as a defense mechanism.</p> <p>The unique flavor of wasabi is a result of complex chemical mixtures from the broken cells of the plant, including those resulting from the hydrolysis of thioglucosides into glucose and methylthioalkyl isothiocyanates:</p> <p>6-methylthiohexyl isothiocyanate</p> <p>7-methylthioheptyl isothiocyanate</p> <p>8-methylthiooctyl isothiocyanate</p> <p>Research has shown that such isothiocyanates inhibit microbe growth, perhaps with implications for preserving food against spoilage and suppressing oral bacterial growth.</p> <p>Because the burning sensations of wasabi are not oil-based, they are short-lived compared to the effects of chili peppers, and are washed away with more food or liquid. The sensation is felt primarily in the nasal passage and can be quite painful depending on the amount consumed. Inhaling or sniffing wasabi vapor has an effect like smelling salts, a property exploited by researchers attempting to create a smoke alarm for the deaf. One deaf subject participating in a test of the prototype awoke within 10 seconds of wasabi vapor sprayed into his sleeping chamber.[21] The 2011 Ig Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to the researchers for determining the ideal density of airborne wasabi to wake people in the event of an emergency.</p> <p><strong>Preparation</strong></p> <p>Wasabi is often grated with a metal oroshigane, but some prefer to use a more traditional tool made of dried sharkskin with fine skin on one side and coarse skin on the other. A hand-made grater with irregular teeth can also be used. If a shark-skin grater is unavailable, ceramic is usually preferred.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The two kanji characters "山" and "葵" do not correspond to their pronunciation: as such it is an example of gikun (meaning, not sound). The two characters actually refer to the mountain Asarum, as the plant's leaves resemble those of a member of Asarum species, in addition to its ability to grow on shady hillsides. The word, in the form 和佐比, appeared in 918 in The Japanese Names of Medical Herbs (本草和名 Honzō Wamyō). Spelled in this way, the particular kanji are used for their phonetic values only, known as ateji (sound, not meaning – opposite of gikun).</p> <h3><strong>Dear customers, please note you can not buy Wasabi seeds from China. All of china sellers will send you normal mustard seeds or some kind of other seeds. You can see now in our pictures how do real Wasabi seeds look like.</strong></h3> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 4
Wasabi Seeds (Wasabia japonica, Eutrema japonicum)

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Rare Black Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys nigra)

Rare Black Bamboo Seeds...

Price €1.95 (SKU: B 2)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Rare Black Bamboo&nbsp;Seeds&nbsp;(Phyllostachys nigra)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The popular &amp; beautiful Black Bamboo with jet black culms &amp; feathery green leaves</p> <div>can grow to an average of 25' in most climates.&nbsp;Although sometimes erroneously reported as a clumping bamboo,&nbsp;it is a runner that starts slow but then can become vigorous when mature.</div> <div>The recommended zones are 7-10 although it will reach approx. 16' in zone 6 &amp; will grow in zone 5 in a very well protected location although the growth will probably be spindly.</div> <div>An awesome choice to grow indoors!</div> <div>&nbsp;Very exotic, it has a dramatic straight upright habit growing 6-10' in a pot but can be easily pruned to keep shorter. Locate in sunniest window, feed and water amply during the growth period &amp; summer outdoors (protect from strong winds).</div> <div>Soak your seeds in about 85° F (30° C) water for 24 hours. Make sure it doesn’t get too hot, as temperatures over 105° F (40° C) can kill your seeds. Cooler temperatures however, will not hurt the seeds, but may delay germination by a few days.</div> <div>5</div> <div>Use a skewer or chopstick to open and rough up the top part of the peat pellets.</div> <div>6</div> <div>Put only one seed in the middle of each pellet. Because bamboo seeds are rare and expensive, you don't want to risk having two sprout in the same pellet and have to lose one of them.</div> <div>7</div> <div>Add a small amount of “seedling mix�? type potting soil over the top of your seeds. 1/8 to ¼ inch (2 to 5 mm) is enough.</div> <div>8</div> <div>Put the mini greenhouse in a location where it will get medium shade. An east-facing window is good if the weather outside is cold, or a moderately shady area outside if the weather is good. NOTE: Wherever you put it, it should not get too much direct sun. Even a mini greenhouse can quickly get up to seed killing temperatures in hot direct sun.</div> <div>9</div> <div>Check on the greenhouse daily, as the peat pellets can dry out quickly once the water from main soak evaporates. Before the seeds sprout, they can survive getting too dry once or so. But as soon as they sprout, they can die in a matter of hours if they dry out. If the peat pellets start getting too dry, use a spray bottle to dampen them again. You may need as much as a whole squirt per pellet to dampen to the interior of the pellet.</div> <div>10</div> <div>You may see a sprout within 10 days from planting, though the bulk of germination will occur after at least 15 or 20 days. Different species have different germination rates, so don’t get disappointed too soon.</div> <div>11</div> <div>If any of the sprouts get tall enough to touch the plastic dome lid while others are still getting started, prop the lid up as necessary to prevent the leaves from touching it… Any leaves resting against the lid will quickly rot and risk killing the seedling.</div> <div>12</div> <div>After about 30 days, most of the seeds that are going to sprout with this method will have done so. Transplant all of the healthy sprouts into 4�? (or half-liter) pots using the next few steps. But don’t discard the rest of the seeds yet, as we will jar a few more into action by changing the conditions for them.</div> <div>13</div> <div>Mix a good potting soil with about 50% small bark-chip mulch. This makes a potting mix with very high drainage that is good for bamboo.</div> <div>14</div> <div>Put a little (1/2 inch or 1 cm minimum) of this potting mix into the pots.</div> <div>15</div> <div>Move each pellet that has a sprout into a pot and fill around it so that the pellet is buried at least ¼ inch below the potting soil.</div> <div>16</div> <div>Give the pots a good dose of water. Because of the really good drainage, don’t worry too much about over watering.</div> <div>17</div> <div>Set these pots in an outdoor location that gets about 50% shade and that never gets full hot direct sun for more than a few minutes at a time. These seedlings are now well on their way. You will likely lose another 10% of them for no apparent reason at all, but the rest will have a good chance at making it to maturity.</div> <div>18</div> <div>Go back to the tray of remaining un-sprouted seeds and put the plastic lid aside. Store it for future use if you want, but these seeds and seedlings have no more use for it.</div> <div>19</div> <div>If your mini-greenhouse tray has a removable plastic liner that helps organize the pellets, take it out and make several drainage holes in the bottom of the unlined tray.</div> <div>20</div> <div>Put all of the pellets back in without the liner. Space them roughly evenly, and keep them the same side up as before… Seeds to the top.</div> <div>21</div> <div>Fill in around the pellets with seedling mix type potting soil, and mound it up to cover the top of the pellets by about ¼ inch (5mm).</div> <div>22</div> <div>Place this tray outside in the medium to full sun, checking it daily to keep it damp but not too wet. Because of removing the dome and the increased sun, expect to need to water nearly every day. It is probably helpful to switch to a regular watering can at this point, as you can give it a more normal dose of water.</div> <div>23</div> <div>Hopefully, you will see a whole new set of seedlings start to come up over the next few weeks. As these start to look ready, take them back to step 12 and get them transplanted.</div>
B 2 (5 S)
Rare Black Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys nigra)
Key lime seeds (Citrus...

Key lime seeds (Citrus...

Price €2.25 (SKU: V 119 CAKL)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Key lime seeds (Citrus aurantiifolia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">The<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Key lime</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Citrus</i><span>&nbsp;</span>×<span>&nbsp;</span><i>aurantiifolia</i>) is a<span>&nbsp;</span>citrus hybrid<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>C. hystrix</i><span>&nbsp;</span>x<span>&nbsp;</span><i>C. medica</i>) with a spherical fruit, 25–50&nbsp;mm (1–2&nbsp;in) in diameter. The Key lime is usually picked while it is still green, but it becomes yellow when ripe.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">The Key lime is smaller, seedier, has higher acidity, stronger aroma, and thinner<span>&nbsp;</span>rind<span>&nbsp;</span>than the<span>&nbsp;</span>Persian lime<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Citrus × latifolia</i>). It is valued for its characteristic flavor. The name comes from its association with the<span>&nbsp;</span>Florida Keys, where it is best known as the<span>&nbsp;</span>flavoring<span>&nbsp;</span>ingredient in<span>&nbsp;</span>Key lime pie. It is also known as<span>&nbsp;</span><b>West Indian lime</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>bartender's lime</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Omani lime</b>, or<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Mexican lime</b>, the last classified as a distinct<span>&nbsp;</span>race<span>&nbsp;</span>with a thicker skin and darker green color. Philippine varieties have various names, including<span>&nbsp;</span><i><b>dayap</b></i><span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span><i>bilolo</i>.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p><i>C. aurantiifolia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is a shrubby tree, to 5&nbsp;m (16&nbsp;ft), with many<span>&nbsp;</span>thorns. Dwarf varieties exist that can be grown indoors during winter months and in colder climates. Its trunk, which rarely grows straight, has many branches, and they often originate quite far down on the trunk. The leaves are ovate, 25–90&nbsp;mm (1–<span class="frac nowrap">3<span class="visualhide">&nbsp;</span><sup style="font-size: 11.2px;">1</sup>⁄<sub style="font-size: 11.2px;">2</sub></span>&nbsp;in) long, resembling<span>&nbsp;</span>orange<span>&nbsp;</span>leaves (the scientific name<span>&nbsp;</span><i>aurantiifolia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>refers to this resemblance to the leaves of the orange,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Citrus aurantium</i>). The<span>&nbsp;</span>flowers<span>&nbsp;</span>are 25 mm (1 in) in diameter, are yellowish-white with a light purple tinge on the margins. Flowers and fruit appear throughout the year but are most abundant from May to September in the Northern Hemisphere.<sup id="cite_ref-purdue1_5-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <p>Skin contact can sometimes cause<span>&nbsp;</span>phytophotodermatitis,<sup id="cite_ref-Weber_et_al._1999_6-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>which makes the skin especially sensitive to<span>&nbsp;</span>ultraviolet<span>&nbsp;</span>light.</p> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><strong><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation_and_propagation">Cultivation and propagation</span></strong></h3> <div class="thumb tright" style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>There are various approaches to the cultivation of Key limes. This variety of&nbsp;</span>citrus<span>&nbsp;can be propagated from seed and will grow true to the parent.<br><span>If the plants are propagated from seed, the seeds should be stored at least 5–6 months before planting.</span></span></div>
V 119 CAKL
Key lime seeds (Citrus aurantiifolia)
Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media) 1.55 - 1

Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria...

Price €1.95 (SKU: MHS 81)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 100 (0,046 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Stellaria media, chickweed, is a cool-season annual plant native to Europe, but naturalized in many parts of North America. It is used as a cooling herbal remedy, and grown as a vegetable crop and ground cover for both human consumption and poultry. It is sometimes called common chickweed to distinguish it from other plants called chickweed. Other common names include chickenwort, craches, maruns, winterweed. The plant germinates in autumn or late winter, then forms large mats of foliage. Flowers are small and white, followed quickly by the seed pods. This plant flowers and sets seed at the same time.</p> <p>Stellaria media is widespread in North America, Europe and Asia. There are several closely related plants referred to as chickweed, but which lack the culinary properties of plants in the genus Stellaria. Plants in the genus Cerastium are very similar in appearance to Stellaria and are in the same family (Carophyllaceae). Stellaria media can be easily distinguished from all other members of this family by examining the stems. Stellaria has fine hairs on only one side of the stem in a single band and on the sepals.[1] Other members of the family Carophyllaceae which resemble Stellaria have hairs uniformly covering the entire stem. It usually has 3 stamens[1] other references indicate 5 stamens[2] and 3 - 8 in other references.</p> <p>The larvae of the European moth yellow shell (Camptogramma bilineata), of North American moths pale-banded dart (Agnorisma badinodis) or dusky cutworm (Agrotis venerabilis) or North American butterfly dainty sulphur (Nathalis iole) all feed on chickweed.</p> <p>In both Europe and North America this plant is common in gardens,[4] fields, and disturbed grounds. Control is difficult due to the heavy seed sets. Common Chickweed is very competitive with small grains, and can produce up to 80% yield losses among barley.</p> <h2><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></h2> <h2><strong>As food</strong></h2> <p>Stellaria media is edible and nutritious, and is used as a leaf vegetable, often raw in salads. It is one of the ingredients of the symbolic dish consumed in the Japanese spring-time festival, Nanakusa-no-sekku.</p> <h3><strong>Toxicity</strong></h3> <p>S. media contains plant chemicals known as saponins, which can be toxic when consumed in large quantities. Chickweed has been known to cause saponin poisoning in cattle. However, as the animal must consume several kilos of chickweed in order to reach a toxic level, such deaths are rare.</p> <p><strong>In folk medicine</strong></p> <p>The plant has medicinal purposes and is used in folk medicine. It has been used as a remedy to treat itchy skin conditions and pulmonary diseases.[7] 17th century herbalist John Gerard recommended it as a remedy for mange. Modern herbalists prescribe it for iron-deficiency anemia (for its high iron content), as well as for skin diseases, bronchitis, rheumatic pains, arthritis and period pain.[8] Not all of these uses are supported by scientific evidence.</p>
MHS 81 (0,046 g)
Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media) 1.55 - 1
Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds 1.85 - 1

Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds

Price €3.00 (SKU: V 18 PCX)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Passiflora colinvauxii or Colinvaux's Passion Flower. This Rare Passiflora climber is under threat in its natural habitat and is one of 45 Passiflora listed in The 1997 IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants. It is listed as rare. This plant is an extremely prolific bloomer who likes to live in partial shade.</p> <p>It smells like honeysuckle and attracts bees and butterflies. It is a fast-growing climber with bi-lobed leaves 7-16 cm. It flowers profusely in summer which will attract bees.</p> <p>The flowers are medium in size. The sepals and petals are white. The corona consists of a series of filaments, purple with white ends.</p> <p>The fruits are oval, 2-4 cm long, and 1-1.5 cm wide.</p> <p>It is found on the famous Galapagos Islands where it was discovered in 1966, but it probably traveled there from Ecuador.</p> <p>USDA Hardiness Zones 10 to 11</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>about 24-48 hours soak in warm water</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>25 ° C +</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 18 PCX (3 S)
Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds 1.85 - 1
Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose...

Price €2.35 (SKU: T 25 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 1g (+-10) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Argyreia nervosa is a perennial climbing vine that is native to the Indian subcontinent and introduced to numerous areas worldwide, including Hawaii, Africa, and the Caribbean. Though it can be invasive, it is often prized for its aesthetic value. Common names include Hawaiian Baby Woodrose, Adhoguda अधोगुडा or Vidhara विधारा (Sanskrit), Elephant Creeper and Woolly Morning Glory. There are two botanical varieties: Argyreia nervosavar. nervosa described here, and Argyrea nervosa var. speciosa, a species used in ayurvedic medicine, but with little to no psychoactive value.</p> <p>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose seeds may be consumed for their various ergoline alkaloids, such as Lysergic acid amide, which can produce psychedelic effects.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The plant is a rare example of a plant whose hallucinogenic properties were not recognized until recent times. While its cousins in the Convolvulaceae family, such as the Rivea corymbosa (Ololiuhqui) and Ipomoea tricolor (Tlitliltzin), were used in shamanic rituals of Latin America for centuries, the Hawaiian Baby Woodrose was not traditionally recognized as a hallucinogen. Its properties were first brought to attention in the 1960s, despite the fact that the chemical composition of its seeds is nearly identical to those of the two species mentioned above, and the seeds contain the highest concentration of psychoactive compounds in the entire family.</p> <p><strong>Seeds</strong></p> <p>In most countries, it is legal to purchase, sell or germinate Argyreia nervosa seeds, but they are generally unapproved for human consumption. Depending on the country, it may be illegal to buy seeds with the intention to consume them, and several countries have outlawed ergine-containing seeds altogether. In Australia, retailers are required to treat their seeds with chemicals to discourage consumption, and it is illegal to buy or possess untreated seeds.</p> <p><strong>Extracted chemicals</strong></p> <p>Extracting ergine from Argyreia speciosa seeds is illegal in the USA since it is a scheduled substance. It is classified as a schedule III depressant by the DEA, although the substance has hallucinogenic/psychedelic properties.</p> <p>Extracts</p> <p>In an animal model of ulcers in rats, large doses of the extract of Argyreia speciosa leaves (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight) showed dose-dependent antiulcer activity and cured the Ulcers.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
T 25 (1g)
Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1

Giant plant (with giant fruits)
Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth 1.85 - 1

Giant Sunflower Seeds -...

Price €1.85 (SKU: VE 68)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth</strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><b style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of </b><font color="#ff0000"><b>1g (10), 9g (100)</b></font><b style="color: #ff0000;">&nbsp;seeds.</b></span></h3> <p>This popular and easy to grow Giant Russian Mammoth Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Organic Heirloom Variety.</p> <p>These plants make beautiful flowers that produce tasty, edible seeds. Stalks can grow to 8-12 feet (2.1-3.7 meters) with Giant flowers. Will tolerate poorer quality soils.</p> <p>Sow seed after danger of frost in an area that receives full sun. Sow seed 8 inches apart and about 1 inch deep. Thin seedlings when they are 3 inches tall so that the final spacing is 15 inches apart. They bloom during summer.</p>
VE 68 (1g)
Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth 1.85 - 1

Giant plant (with giant fruits)
Giant strawberry seeds

Giant strawberry seeds

Price €2.85 (SKU: V 1 GS)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant strawberry seeds</strong></h2> <h2 style="font-size: 2rem;"><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 100 (0.06g) seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Strawberries, Fragaria ananassa L. Maximus, are quite easy to grow! They are perennial, winter hardy, and will thrive in full sunshine, as long as the soil is fertile and well-drained. Healthy plants will produce an abundance of berries for years! Strawberries are as big as apples! This standard "GIANT" type will provide you with the largest crop! These everbearing Giants will produce throughout the summer for Best desserts and snacks!</p> <p>Strawberries need light to germinate and their seeds shouldn't be covered. But practice has shown that uncovered strawberry seeds dry out very quickly during germination. I, therefore, recommend covering the seed very lightly with sieved seeding soil. After sowing and moistening, you can also place a glass pane on the sowing tray.</p> <p>Seeds need at least 60 days of stratification.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 1 GS (0,06G)
Giant strawberry seeds
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds

Black Strawberry Seeds -...

Price €2.25 (SKU: V 1)
,
5/ 5
<h2>Black Strawberry Seeds - Exotic Rare</h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 10 seeds.</span></h2> <p><strong style="color:#ff0000;font-size:18px;"></strong>A lovely Black Strawberry that is fully hardy. Perfect for small spaces or containers, it will produce an abundance of small sweet fruit, with a hint of pineapple.</p> <p>Heavy cropping and easy to grow.</p> <p>Perennial herb densely clustered with straighter branches.15-25cm in height. Cymose anthotaxy with juicy flesh. Require loosing and weeding at intervals on the loose fertile soil with ample organic fertilizers. Favor to warm and need moisture to live through the winter.</p> <div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <h3 align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">20-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p> </p> </div> </div>
V 1
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Chinese Chestnut Seeds...

Chinese Chestnut Seeds...

Price €2.95 (SKU: V 13 C)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Chinese Chestnut Seeds (Castanea mollissima)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span>Castanea mollissima (Chinese: 板栗; pinyin: bǎnlì), also known as Chinese chestnut, is a member of the family Fagaceae, and a species of chestnut native to China, Taiwan, and Korea.</span></p> <p><span>It is a deciduous tree growing to 20 m tall with a broad crown. The leaves are alternate, simple, 10–22 cm long and 4.5–8 cm broad, with a toothed margin. The flowers are produced in catkins 4–20 cm long, with the female flowers at the base of the catkin and males on the rest. The fruit is a densely spiny cupule 4–8 cm diameter, containing two or three glossy brown nuts; these are 2–3 cm diameter on wild trees. The scientific name mollissima derives from the softly downy shoots and young leaves.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Taxonomy</span></strong></p> <p><span>Synonyms: Castanea bungeana Blume; C. duclouxii Dode; C. fargesii Dode; C. formosana (Hayata) Hayata; C. hupehensis Dode; C. mollissima var. pendula X. Y. Zhou &amp; Z. D. Zhou; C. sativa Miller var. formosana Hayata; C. sativa var. mollissima (Blume) Pampanini; C. vulgaris Lamarck var. yunnanensis Franchet.</span></p> <p><span>In Vietnam, Chinese chestnut (Vietnamese language: hạt dẻ, Tày language: mác lịch) which are grown in Trùng Khánh district, Cao Bằng province have highest quality with 3.3-5.4% glucose, 43.36- 46.47% glucid, 1.16 – 2% lipid, 3.12 – 3.62% protein analyzed by Vietnam National Vegetable and Fruit Researching Institution in 1999.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Distribution and habitat</span></strong></p> <p><span>Naturally an understory tree, Chinese chestnut has been cultivated in East Asia for millennia and its exact original range cannot be determined. In the provinces of Anhui, Fujian, Gansu, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Liaoning, Nei Mongol, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Sichuan, Xizang, Yunnan, and Zhejiang, and also to Taiwan and Korea. It grows close to sea level in the north of its range, and at altitudes of up to 2,800 m in the south of the range. The species prefers full sun and acidic, loamy soil, and has a medium growth rate.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Ecology</span></strong></p> <p><span>When cultivated close to other species of chestnut (including Japanese chestnut, C. crenata; American chestnut, C. dentata; and sweet chestnut, C. sativa), Chinese chestnut readily cross-pollinates with them to form hybrids.</span></p> <p><span>Chinese chestnuts have evolved over a long period of time in coexistence with the bark fungal disease chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica, formerly Endothia parasitica), and have evolved a very successful resistance to the blight, probably more so than any other species of chestnut, so that, although it is not immune, it typically sustains no more than minor damage when infected. It's important to realize, though, that Chinese chestnut trees vary considerably in blight resistance. Some individuals are quite susceptible while others are essentially immune to the disease.[4] Japanese chestnut is also comparatively resistant to blight, with European chestnut somewhat less so. In the 1890s, Chinese and Japanese chestnuts were imported to the United States with the intention of utilizing them as orchard trees due to their small, compact size compared to the towering American chestnut. The results unfortunately were disastrous as the imported Asian species introduced blight to which C. dentata lacked any resistance. The disease was first noticed on a tree in the Brooklyn Zoo in 1902 and quickly spread all out of control, ravaging American chestnuts. Within 30 years, there were very few left in their native range. An active program has been pursued in North America to cross-breed the Chinese and American chestnuts to try to maximize various desirable traits of the American chestnut, such as larger stature, larger leaf size, larger nut size, and greater nut sweetness, while also isolating and carrying the blight resistance from the Chinese chestnut.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Uses</span></strong></p> <p><span>The nuts are edible, and the tree is widely cultivated in eastern Asia; over 300 cultivars have been selected for nut production, subdivided into five major regional groups: Northern, Yangtze River Valley, Sichuan and Guizhou, Southern, and Southwestern. Besides that, the Dandong chestnut (belonging to the Japanese chestnut – Castanea crenata) is a major cultivar in Liaoning Province.[6] Some cultivars, such as 'Kuling', 'Meiling', and 'Nanking', have large nuts up to 4 cm diameter. The nuts are sweet, and considered by some to have the best taste of any chestnut,[7] though others state they are not as good as the American chestnut.[8] The nuts also provide a significant food source for wildlife.</span></p> </body> </html>
V 13 C
Chinese Chestnut Seeds (Castanea mollissima)
Butterfly Pea, Blue Pea Vine Seeds 2.65 - 6

Butterfly Pea, Blue Pea...

Price €2.65 (SKU: VE 121)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Butterfly Pea, Blue Pea Vine Seeds (Clitoria ternatea)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Clitoria ternatea, commonly known as Asian pigeonwings, bluebellvine, blue pea, butterfly pea, cordofan pea and Darwin pea, is a plant species belonging to the Fabaceae family. The flowers of this vine have the shape of human female genitals, hence the Latin name of the genus "Clitoria", from "clitoris". (Synonyms: Clitoris principissae.)</p> <p>This plant is native to tropical equatorial Asia (Indonesia and Malaysia), but has been introduced to Africa, Australia and America.</p> <p>It is a perennial herbaceous plant, with elliptic, obtuse leaves. It grows as a vine or creeper, doing well in moist, neutral soil. The most striking feature about this plant is the color of its flowers, a vivid deep blue; solitary, with light yellow markings. They are about 4 cm (1.6 in) long by 3 cm (1.2 in) wide. Some varieties yield white flowers.</p> <p>The fruits are 5–7 cm (2.0–2.8 in) long, flat pods with six to ten seeds in each pod. They are edible when tender.</p> <p>It is grown as an ornamental plant and as a revegetation species (e.g., in coal mines in Australia), requiring little care when cultivated. As a legume, its roots form a symbiotic association with soil bacteria known as rhizobia, which transform atmospheric N2 into a plant-usable form, therefore, this plant is also used to improve soil quality through the decomposition of nitrogen rich plant material.</p> <h2><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></h2> <h2><strong>Food</strong></h2> <p>In Southeast Asia the flower is used as a natural food colouring. In Malay cooking, an aqueous extract is used to colour glutinous rice for kuih ketan (also known as pulut tai tai or pulut tekan in Peranakan/Nyonya cooking) and in nyonya chang. In Kelantan, east part of Malaysia, by adding a few buds of this flower in a pot while cooking white rice will add bluish tint on the rice which is served with other side dishes and such meal is called nasi kerabu. In Thailand, a syrupy blue drink is made called nam dok anchan (น้ำดอกอัญชัน), it is sometimes consumed with a drop of sweet lime juice to increase acidity and turn the juice into pink-purple. In Burmese and Thai cuisines, the flowers are also dipped in batter and fried. Butterfly pea flower tea is made from the ternatea flowers and dried lemongrass and changes color depending on what is added to the liquid, with lemon juice turning it purple.</p> <h2><strong>Traditional medicine</strong></h2> <p>In traditional Ayurvedic medicine, it is ascribed various qualities including memory enhancing, nootropic, antistress, anxiolytic, antidepressant, anticonvulsant, tranquilizing, and sedative properties. In traditional Chinese medicine, due to its appearance similar to the female reproductive organ, and consistent with the Western concept of the doctrine of signatures, the plant has been ascribed properties affecting this organ.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Chemical constituents</strong></p> <p>Chemical compounds isolated from C. ternatea include various triterpenoids, flavonol glycosides, anthocyanins and steroids. Peptides known as cliotides have been isolated from the heat-stable fraction of C. ternatea extract.</p> <h2>Growing Requirements for Butterfly Peas</h2> <p>Unfortunately, Butterfly Pea plants are only hardy in USDA zones 10-11, but because they are such fast growers they are often grown as an annual plant in colder regions.</p> <p>Butterfly Peas prefer to be grown in full sun but they will tolerate light shade.</p> <p>These are very drought tolerant plants, but they should be watered regularly for the best results.</p> <p>Never over water Butterfly Peas!</p> <p>Pinch regularly to induce bushiness.</p> <p>Butterfly Pea seed pods are edible and tasty.</p> <h2>Growing Butterfly Pea Vines from Seed</h2> <p>The seeds of the Butterfly Pea should be nicked or filed, then soaked overnight in room temperature water before planting.</p> <p>They can be sown directly in the garden with 3-4 inch spacing when the soil warms in the spring.</p> <p>Start seeds indoors 12 weeks before the warm weather arrives, maintaining a temperature within the growing medium of 70°-75° F.</p> <p>Germination takes 15-20 days.</p> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <h2 align="center"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></h2> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><strong>Propagation:</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center">Seeds</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center">Carefully scarify seeds with a knife, or roughen with sandpaper.</p> <p align="center">Then soak in warm water for 12 h.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><strong>Stratification:</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center">0</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center">all year round&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center">0,5 cm</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center">25-28°C</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><strong>Location:</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center">bright + keep constantly moist, <strong>but not wet!</strong></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center">3-6 weeks</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><strong>Watering:</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center">in the growing season moderate water + let dry between watering</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><strong><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena.&nbsp;</em></strong></p> <p align="center"><strong><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></strong></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
VE 121 (5 S)
Butterfly Pea, Blue Pea Vine Seeds 2.65 - 6
Snow Gum Eucalyptus Seeds - Hardy −23 °C 2.05 - 1

Snow Gum Eucalyptus Seeds -...

Price €2.05 (SKU: T 63)
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="font-size:14pt;"><strong>Snow Gum Eucalyptus Seeds - Hardy −23 °C (Eucalyptus pauciflora)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;font-size:14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Eucalyptus pauciflora, commonly known as Snow Gum or White Sallee, is a species of flowering plant in the family Myrtaceae. It is a small tree or large shrub growing 4–8 m (13–26 ft) tall, occasionally reaching 20 m (66 ft), and native to subalpine and lowland habitats in eastern Australia. It is amongst the hardiest of all eucalyptus species, surviving the severe winter temperatures of the Australian Alps. Other common names include Cabbage Gum, Weeping Gum and White Sallee.</p> <p>The bark of Eucalyptus pauciflora is smooth and white to light grey or sometimes brown-red, shedding in patches or strips to give a mottled appearance. The grey-green adult leaves are usually lanceolate to broadly lanceolate with distinct parallel veins, but may be narrowly ovate. The tree is covered in a mass of white flowers in spring and summer. The term pauciflora (few flowers) is a misnomer, and may originate in an early collected specimen losing its buds in transit. Rather than losing its leaves in winter/autumn, the tree is evergreen, adapting to the weight of snow by progressively bending its branches so that the outermost branches extend vertically down and snow is shed from the leaves.</p> <p>Snow gums occur as woodlands and open woodlands at altitudes of 1,300–1,800 m (4,265–5,906 ft) in Victoria, Tasmania, New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory, where they form the altitudinal limit of the tree line. The distribution of the lowland form extends a short distance across the Queensland and South Australian borders. Because of land clearing, few stands of lowland snow gum remain, and considerable efforts are being put into preserving the remnants.</p> <p>E. pauciflora regenerates from seed, by epicormic shoots below the bark, and from lignotubers.</p> <p><strong>It is the most cold-tolerant species of eucalyptus, with E. pauciflora subsp. niphophila surviving temperatures down to −23 °C (−9 °F) and year-round frosts.</strong></p> <p> It has been introduced to Norway.</p>
T 63
Snow Gum Eucalyptus Seeds - Hardy −23 °C 2.05 - 1
Seeds Panax Ginseng, Asian Ginseng - Medicinal plant

Seeds Panax Ginseng, Asian...

Price €2.50 (SKU: MHS 20)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Seeds Panax Ginseng, Asian Ginseng</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Panax ginseng has an ancient history. It has been used as medicine in China from more than 2000 years. It is also well known as Asian ginseng or Korean ginseng. The word ginseng is derived from Chinese word ‘Renseng’ or ‘Jinchen’ which means ‘like a man’ in accordance with their resemblance to the shape of the human body and the word Panax originates from the Latin word panacea which means ‘cure all’. Ginseng is native to China, Russia, North Korea,Japan and South Korea</p> <p><strong>WIKIPEDIA:</strong></p> <p>Ginseng (pronounced /ˈdʒɪnsɛŋ/[1]) is any one of 11 species of slow-growing perennial plants with fleshy roots, belonging to the genus Panax of the family Araliaceae.</p> <p>Ginseng is found only in the Northern Hemisphere, in North America and in eastern Asia (mostly Korea, northeast China, Bhutan, and eastern Siberia), typically in cooler climates. Panax vietnamensis, discovered in Vietnam, is the southernmost ginseng known. This article focuses on the series Panax ginsengs, which are the adaptogenic herbs, principally Panax ginseng and P. quinquefolius. Ginseng is characterized by the presence of ginsenosides.</p> <p>Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is in the same family, but not genus, as true ginseng. Like ginseng, it is considered to be an adaptogenic herb. The active compounds in Siberian ginseng are eleutherosides, not ginsenosides. Instead of a fleshy root, Siberian ginseng has a woody root.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The English word ginseng derives from the Chinese term rénshēn (simplified: 人参; traditional: 人蔘). Rén means "man" and shēn means "plant root"; this refers to the root's characteristic forked shape, which resembles the legs of a man.[2] The English pronunciation derives from a southern Chinese reading, similar to Cantonese yun sum (Jyutping: jan4sam1) and the Hokkien pronunciation "jîn-sim".</p> <p>The botanical/genus name Panax means "all-heal" in Greek, sharing the same origin as "panacea", and was applied to this genus because Linnaeus was aware of its wide use in Chinese medicine as a muscle relaxant.</p> <p>Besides P. ginseng, many other plants are also known as or mistaken for the ginseng root. The most commonly known examples are xiyangshen, also known as American ginseng 西洋参 (P. quinquefolius), Japanese ginseng 东洋参 (P. japonicus), crown prince ginseng 太子參 (Pseudostellaria heterophylla), and Siberian ginseng[3] 刺五加 (Eleutherococcus senticosus). Although all have the name ginseng, each plant has distinctively different functions. However, true ginseng plants belong only to the Panax genus.</p> <p><strong>Traditional uses</strong></p> <p>The root is most often available in dried form, either whole or sliced. Ginseng leaf, although not as highly prized, is sometimes also used; as with the root, it is most often available in dried form. Folk medicine attributes various benefits to oral use of American ginseng and Asian ginseng (P. ginseng) roots, including roles as an aphrodisiac, stimulant, type II diabetes treatment, or cure for sexual dysfunction in men.</p> <p>Ginseng may be included in small doses in energy drinks[6] or tisanes, such as ginseng coffee.[7] It may be found in hair tonics and cosmetic preparations, as well, but those uses have not been shown to be clinically effective.</p> <p><strong>Research</strong></p> <p>Ginsenosides, unique compounds of the Panax species, are under basic and clinical research to investigate their potential for use in medicine.</p> <p>According to the American Cancer Society, "available scientific evidence does not support claims that ginseng is effective in preventing or treating cancer in humans".[9] Research into the potential uses of ginseng continues, although so far it has not established its benefits for treating other medical conditions either.</p> <p>Ginseng is known to contain phytoestrogens</p> <p><strong>Side effects</strong></p> <p>A common side effect of P. ginseng may be insomnia,[13] but this effect is disputed.[14] Other side effects can include nausea, diarrhea, headaches, nose bleeds,[15] high blood pressure, low blood pressure, and breast pain.[16] Ginseng may also lead to induction of mania in depressed patients who mix it with antidepressants.</p> <p>Ginseng has been shown to have adverse drug reactions with phenelzine and warfarin, but has been shown to decrease blood alcohol levels.</p> <p><strong>Overdose</strong></p> <p>The common adaptogen ginsengs (P. ginseng and P. quinquefolia) are generally considered to be relatively safe even in large amounts. One of the most common and characteristic symptoms of acute overdose of Panax ginseng is bleeding. Symptoms of mild overdose may include dry mouth and lips, excitation, fidgeting, irritability, tremor, palpitations, blurred vision, headache, insomnia, increased body temperature, increased blood pressure, edema, decreased appetite, dizziness, itching, eczema, early morning diarrhea, bleeding, and fatigue.</p> <p>Symptoms of gross overdose with Panax ginseng may include nausea, vomiting, irritability, restlessness, urinary and bowel incontinence, fever, increased blood pressure, increased respiration, decreased sensitivity and reaction to light, decreased heart rate, cyanotic (blue) facial complexion, red facial complexion, seizures, convulsions, and delirium.</p> <p>Patients experiencing any of the above symptoms are advised to discontinue the herbs and seek any necessary symptomatic treatment.</p> <p><strong>Sowing Panax ginseng</strong></p> <p>Soak seeds overnight in water and then wrap in damp kitchen towel and store in a sealed plastic bag for 5-8 weeks at 3-4 °C in the refrigerator. After this cooling period sow seed with sowing depth of approximately 1 cm, well moistened up at 20-25° C.</p> <p>Germination time - after the cooling period: 10-15 weeks.</p> <p>Without cooling period, the seeds do not germinate!</p> <p> </p> <h3><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Common classification</span></em></strong></h3> <h3><strong>Asian ginseng (root)</strong></h3> <p>Panax ginseng is available commercially in four forms: fresh, red, white and sun ginsengs. Wild ginseng is used where available.</p> <h3><strong>Red ginseng</strong></h3> <p>Red ginseng (Hangul: 홍삼; Hanja: 紅蔘; RR: hong-sam; traditional Chinese: 紅蔘; simplified Chinese: 红参; pinyin: hóng shēn), P. ginseng, has been peeled, heated either through steaming at standard boiling temperatures of 100 °C (212 °F), and then dried or sun-dried. It is frequently marinated in an herbal brew which results in the root becoming extremely brittle. It is more common as herbal medicine than white ginseng. This version of ginseng is traditionally associated with stimulating sexual function and increasing energy. Red ginseng is always produced from cultivated roots, generally from Korea.</p> <p>A study of ginseng's effects on rats found, while both white ginseng and red ginseng appear to reduce the incidence of cancer, the effects appear to be greater with red ginseng.[19]</p> <p>Another study showed potentially beneficial effects of a combination of Korean red ginseng and highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients.[20]</p> <p>Falcarinol, a 17-carbon diyne fatty alcohol isolated from carrot and red ginseng, was thought to have potent anticancer properties on primary mammary epithelial (breast cancer) cells.[21] Other acetylenic fatty alcohols in ginseng (panaxacol, panaxydol and panaxytriol) have antibiotic properties.</p> <h3><strong>Fresh ginseng</strong></h3> <p>Fresh ginseng is the raw product. Its use is limited by availability.</p> <h3><strong>White ginseng</strong></h3> <p>White ginseng, native to America, is fresh ginseng which has been dried without being heated. It is peeled and dried to reduce the water content to 12% or less. White ginseng air-dried in the sun may contain less of the therapeutic constituents. It is thought by some that enzymes contained in the root break down these constituents in the process of drying. Drying in the sun bleaches the root to a yellowish-white color.</p> <h3><strong>Sun ginseng</strong></h3> <p>Sun ginseng is created from a heat processing method which increases ginsenoside components such as ginsenoside-[Rg.sub.3], -[Rk.sub.1] and -[Rg.sub.5] by steaming white ginseng at a higher temperature than red ginseng. The herb is steamed for three hours at 120 °C (248 °F). Sun ginseng has increased nitric oxide, superoxide, hydroxyl radical and peroxynitrite scavenging activities compared with conventionally processed red or white versions. The increased steaming temperature produces an optimal amount of biological activity due to its ability to amplify specific ginsenosides.</p> <h3><strong>Wild ginseng</strong></h3> <p>Wild ginseng grows naturally and is harvested from wherever it is found. It is relatively rare, and even increasingly endangered, due in large part to high demand for the product in recent years, which has led to the wild plants being sought out and harvested faster than new ones can grow (it requires years for a root to reach maturity). Wild ginseng can be either Asian or American, and can be processed to be red ginseng.</p> <p>Woods-grown American ginseng programs in Vermont, Maine, Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina, West Virginia and Kentucky,[23][24] and United Plant Savers have been encouraging the planting of ginseng both to restore natural habitats and to remove pressure from any remaining wild ginseng, and they offer both advice and sources of rootlets. Woods-grown plants have a value comparable to wild-grown ginseng of similar age.</p> <p>Partially germinated ginseng seeds harvested the previous Fall can be planted from early Spring until late Fall, and will sprout the following Spring. If planted in a wild setting and left to their own devices, they will develop into mature plants which cannot be distinguished from native wild plants. Both Asian and American partially germinated ginseng seeds can be bought from May through December on various eBay sales. Some seed sales come with planting and growing instructions.</p> <h3><strong>P. quinquefolius American ginseng (root)</strong></h3> <p>According to traditional Chinese medicine, American ginseng promotes yin energy, cleans excess yang and calms the body. The reason it has been claimed that American ginseng promotes yin (shadow, cold, negative, female) while Asian ginseng promotes yang (sunshine, hot, positive, male) is that, according to traditional Chinese medicine, things living in cold places or northern side of mountains or southern side of rivers are strong in yang and vice versa, so the two are balanced.[citation needed] Chinese/Korean ginseng grows in Manchuria and Korea, the coldest area known to many Koreans in ancient times. Thus, ginseng from there is supposed to be very yang.</p> <p>Originally, American ginseng was imported into China via subtropical Guangzhou, the seaport next to Hong Kong, so Chinese doctors believed American ginseng must be good for yang, because it came from a hot area. They did not know, however, that American ginseng can only grow in temperate regions. Nonetheless, the root is legitimately classified as more yin because it generates fluids.[25]</p> <p>Most North American ginseng is produced in the Canadian provinces of Ontario and British Columbia and the American state of Wisconsin, according to Agri-food Canada. P. quinquefolius is now also grown in northern China.</p> <p>The aromatic root resembles a small parsnip that forks as it matures. The plant grows 6 to 18 in tall, usually bearing three leaves, each with three to five leaflets two to five inches long.</p> <p><!--StartFragment--></p> <p><strong>Sowing Panax ginseng</strong></p> <p>Soak seeds overnight in water and then wrap in damp kitchen towel and store in a sealed plastic bag for 5-8 weeks at 3-4 °C in the refrigerator. After this cooling period sow seed with sowing depth of approximately 1 cm, well moistened up at 20-25° C.</p> <p>Germination time - after the cooling period: 10-15 weeks.</p> <p>Without cooling period, the seeds do not germinate!</p> <br /> <p></p> <p></p> </div> </body> </html>
MHS 20
Seeds Panax Ginseng, Asian Ginseng - Medicinal plant