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Giant plant (with giant fruits)

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3

Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo...

Price €1.95 (SKU: B 6)
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys bambusoides)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides, commonly called madake, giant timber bamboo or Japanese timber bamboo, is a bamboo species in the genus Phyllostachys.</p> <p>Madake is typically known for being the most common type of bamboo used in the making of shakuhachi flutes and is utilized in numerous Japanese, as well as Chinese, arts, and crafts.</p> <p>Phyllostachys bambusoides can reach a height of 15–22 m and a diameter of 10–15 cm. The culms are dark green, quite thick and very straight. The leaves are dark green. New stalks emerge in late spring and grow quite rapidly, up to 1 meter each day. The flowering interval of this species is very long, about 120 years. This strong plant is in Asia one of the preferred bamboos for building and in the manufacture of furniture.</p> <p>This species is native to China, but it is commonly grown worldwide, especially in Japan.</p> </body> </html>
B 6 (5 S)
Madake, Giant Timber Bamboo Seeds  - 3

This product is best seller product

Variety from Japan
Wasabi Seeds (Wasabia...

Wasabi Seeds (Wasabia...

Price €7.50 (SKU: MHS 4)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Wasabi Seeds (Wasabia japonica, Eutrema japonicum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Wasabi earlier Eutrema japonicum or Wasabia japonica is a plant of the Brassicaceae family, which includes cabbages, horseradish, and mustard. It is also called Japanese horseradish, although horseradish is a different plant (which is generally used as a substitute for wasabi, due to the scarcity of the wasabi plant). Its stem is used as a condiment and has an extremely strong pungency more akin to hot mustard than the capsaicin in a chili pepper, producing vapours that stimulate the nasal passages more than the tongue. The plant grows naturally along stream beds in mountain river valleys in Japan. The two main cultivars in the marketplace are E. japonicum 'Daruma' and 'Mazuma', but there are many others. &nbsp;The origin of wasabi cuisine has been clarified from the oldest historical records; it takes its rise in Nara prefecture.</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>Wasabi is generally sold either as a stem, which must be very finely grated before use, as dried powder in large quantities, or as a ready-to-use paste in tubes similar to travel toothpaste tubes. Because it grows mostly submerged, it is a common misconception to refer to the part used for wasabi as a root or sometimes even a rhizome: it is in fact the stem[6][7] of the plant, with the characteristic leaf scar where old leaves fell off or were collected.</p> <p>In some high-end restaurants, the paste is prepared when the customer orders, and is made using a grater to grate the stem; once the paste is prepared, it loses flavor in 15 minutes if left uncovered.</p> <p>In sushi preparation, sushi chefs usually put the wasabi between the fish and the rice because covering wasabi until served preserves its flavor.</p> <p>Fresh wasabi leaves can be eaten, having the spicy flavor of wasabi stems.</p> <p>Legumes (peanuts, soybeans, or peas) may be roasted or fried, then coated with wasabi powder mixed with sugar, salt, or oil and eaten as a crunchy snack.</p> <p><strong>Surrogates</strong></p> <p>Wasabi favours growing conditions which restricts its wide cultivation. The resulting inability to be cultivated like other crops in order to fully satisfy commercial demand, thus makes it quite expensive. &nbsp;Therefore, outside Japan, it is rare to find real wasabi plants. Due to its high cost, a common substitute is a mixture of horseradish, mustard, starch and green food coloring or spinach powder. Often packages are labeled as wasabi while the ingredients do not actually include wasabi plant. Wasabi and horseradish are similar in taste and pungency due to similar isothiocyanate levels.</p> <p>&nbsp;The primary difference between the two is color with Wasabi being naturally green. In Japan, horseradish is referred to as seiyō wasabi (西洋わさび?, "western wasabi").</p> <p>&nbsp;In the United States, true wasabi is generally found only at specialty grocers and high-end restaurants.</p> <p><strong>Chemistry</strong></p> <p>The chemical in wasabi that provides for its initial pungency is the volatile allyl isothiocyanate, which is produced by hydrolysis of natural thioglucosides (conjugates of the sugar glucose, and sulfur-containing organic compounds); the hydrolysis reaction is catalyzed by myrosinase and occurs when the enzyme is released on cell rupture caused by maceration – e.g., grating – of the plant.[16][17][18] The same compound is responsible for the pungency of horseradish and mustard. Allyl isothiocyanate can also be released when the wasabi plants have been damaged, because it is being used as a defense mechanism.</p> <p>The unique flavor of wasabi is a result of complex chemical mixtures from the broken cells of the plant, including those resulting from the hydrolysis of thioglucosides into glucose and methylthioalkyl isothiocyanates:</p> <p>6-methylthiohexyl isothiocyanate</p> <p>7-methylthioheptyl isothiocyanate</p> <p>8-methylthiooctyl isothiocyanate</p> <p>Research has shown that such isothiocyanates inhibit microbe growth, perhaps with implications for preserving food against spoilage and suppressing oral bacterial growth.</p> <p>Because the burning sensations of wasabi are not oil-based, they are short-lived compared to the effects of chili peppers, and are washed away with more food or liquid. The sensation is felt primarily in the nasal passage and can be quite painful depending on the amount consumed. Inhaling or sniffing wasabi vapor has an effect like smelling salts, a property exploited by researchers attempting to create a smoke alarm for the deaf. One deaf subject participating in a test of the prototype awoke within 10 seconds of wasabi vapor sprayed into his sleeping chamber.[21] The 2011 Ig Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to the researchers for determining the ideal density of airborne wasabi to wake people in the event of an emergency.</p> <p><strong>Preparation</strong></p> <p>Wasabi is often grated with a metal oroshigane, but some prefer to use a more traditional tool made of dried sharkskin with fine skin on one side and coarse skin on the other. A hand-made grater with irregular teeth can also be used. If a shark-skin grater is unavailable, ceramic is usually preferred.</p> <p><strong>Etymology</strong></p> <p>The two kanji characters "山" and "葵" do not correspond to their pronunciation: as such it is an example of gikun (meaning, not sound). The two characters actually refer to the mountain Asarum, as the plant's leaves resemble those of a member of Asarum species, in addition to its ability to grow on shady hillsides. The word, in the form 和佐比, appeared in 918 in The Japanese Names of Medical Herbs (本草和名 Honzō Wamyō). Spelled in this way, the particular kanji are used for their phonetic values only, known as ateji (sound, not meaning – opposite of gikun).</p> <h3><strong>Dear customers, please note you can not buy Wasabi seeds from China. All of china sellers will send you normal mustard seeds or some kind of other seeds. You can see now in our pictures how do real Wasabi seeds look like.</strong></h3> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
MHS 4
Wasabi Seeds (Wasabia japonica, Eutrema japonicum)

Giant plant (with giant fruits)
Giant Yellow Eckendorf Beet...

Giant Yellow Eckendorf Beet...

Price €1.85 (SKU: VE 63 E (3g))
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Yellow Eckendorf Beet Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><b style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of </b><font color="#ff0000" class=""><b>100 (3g)</b></font><b style="color: #ff0000;">&nbsp;seeds.</b></span></h2> <p>The 1927 Henry Fields catalog said, “Giant, smooth, long roots of cylindrical shape, weighing up to 9 kg (20 pounds) each and growing two-thirds above ground. Solid white flesh with high food value.” These big yellow-skinned roots are perfect for growing as animal food, a tradition that is finally being brought back on many small farms.</p> <p>High nutrition and vitamin content, tops are rich sources of vitamin C, eat-in salads or soups. A native of northern Africa and the western Mediterranean, ancient Greeks have used leaves only. Beetroot can be steamed with other vegies or grated raw as well as boiled and pickled for salads. Best results in soil with PH over 6 and if always kept moist. Can sow indoors and transplant. Thin to 30-50mm, young thinnings may be transplanted older thinnings as a leaf vegetable, sow after frost. Roots store well after harvest. Sow spring to autumn, anytime in mild climates. 50-90 seeds per gram</p> <p><strong>Uses</strong></p> <p>Contemporary use is primarily for cattle, pig and other stock feed, although it can be eaten – especially when young – by humans. Considered a crop for cool-temperate climates, the mangelwurzel sown in autumn can be grown as a winter crop in warm-temperate to sub-tropical climates. Both leaves and roots may be eaten. Leaves can be lightly steamed for salads or lightly boiled as a vegetable if treated like English spinach. Grown in well-dug, well-composted soil and watered regularly, the roots become tender, juicy and flavourful. The roots are prepared boiled like potato for serving mashed, diced or in sweet curries. Animals are known to thrive upon this plant; both its leaves and roots provide a nutritious food. George Henderson, a 20th-century English farmer and author on agriculture, stated that mangel beets were one of the best fodders for dairying, as milk production is maximized.</p> <p>The mangelwurzel has a history in England of being used for sport,[5] for celebration, for animal fodder and for the brewing of a potent alcoholic beverage. The 1830 Scottish cookbook The Practice of Cookery includes a recipe for a beer made with mangelwurzel.[6] In 19th-century American usage, mangel beets were sometimes referred to as 'mango.'</p> <p>During the Irish Famine (1845–1852), Poor Law Guardians in Galway City leased (on a 999-year-lease) a twenty-acre former nunnery to house one thousand orphaned or deserted boys ages from five to approximately fifteen. Here the boys were taught tailoring, shoe making, and agricultural skills. On a five-acre plot, they grew potatoes, cabbage, parsnips, carrots, onions, Swedish turnips, and "mangold wurtzel"--both for workhouse consumption as well as for a cash crop. See Lord Sydney Godolphin Osbourne's "Gleanings in the West of Ireland" published in London 1850, T &amp; W Boone, page 58.</p> <p>As with most foods, subsisting on solely one crop can produce dietary deficiency. The food shortages in Europe after World War I caused great hardships, including cases of mangel-wurzel disease, as relief workers called it. It was a consequence of eating only beets.</p> <p><strong>Growing requirements</strong></p> <p>In general, mangelwurzel are easy to grow. They may require supplementary potassium for optimum yields, flavour and texture, and foliage readily displays potassium deficiency as interveinal chlorosis. This can be corrected with either organic or nonorganic sources of potash.</p> <p><strong>In tradition</strong></p> <p>In South Somerset, on the last Thursday of October every year, Punkie Night is celebrated. Children carry around lanterns called "Punkies", which are hollowed-out mangelwurzels. Mangelwurzels are also carved out for Halloween in Norfolk and Wales. Also N.W. Cumberland (Workington), in the 1940s and 50s -- for "Jack o'Lantern" night.</p> <p>John Le Marchant recommends cutting the "mangel-wurzel" to learn the proper mechanics for a draw cut with the broadsword in his historic manual on swordsmanship.</p> <p><strong>In popular culture</strong></p> <p>It is the source of the name for the English folk/pop/comedy/scrumpy-and-western musical group The Wurzels.</p> <p>English comedian Tony Hancock made a short song about mangelwurzels in the Hancock's Half Hour episode "The Bowmans".</p> <p>The mangelwurzel is featured in the 1984 novel Jitterbug Perfume written by Tom Robbins. The main character Alobar originally hails from a Slavic nation where beets are quite prevalent, and eventually the mangelwurzel is used as the base note in the mysterious perfume from which the book derives its name.</p> <p>The mangelwurzel also had a role in the cult TV kids show as Worzel Gummidge's head, where it could often be heard to say things like "go boil your head."</p> <p>Mangels are a frequently mentioned animal fodder in George Orwell's novel, Animal Farm.</p> <p>Mangel wurzel is the only vegetable that was available for Sarah Bruckman to purchase in Two Fronts by Harry Turtledove. Turtledove also uses it as a staple of the post-eruption Maine diet in his Supervolcano series.</p>
VE 63 E (3g)
Giant Yellow Eckendorf Beet Seeds
  • On sale!

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria sinensis) 1.85 - 1

Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria...

Price €3.65 (SKU: T 46)
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5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria sinensis)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Wisteria (also spelled Wistaria or Wysteria) is a genus of flowering plants in the pea family, Fabaceae, that includes ten species of woody climbing vines native to the Eastern United States and to China, Korea, and Japan. Some species are popular ornamental plants, especially in China and Japan. An aquatic flowering plant with the common name wisteria or 'water wisteria' is in fact Hygrophila difformis, in the family Acanthaceae.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 12pt;"><strong>Description</strong></span></p> <p>Wisteria vines climb by twining their stems either clockwise or counterclockwise round any available support. They can climb as high as 20 m above the ground and spread out 10 m laterally. The world's largest known Wisteria vine is in Sierra Madre, California, measuring more than 1 acre (0.40 ha) in size and weighing 250 tons. Planted in 1894, it is of the Chinese lavender variety.</p> <p>The leaves are alternate, 15 to 35 cm long, pinnate, with 9 to 19 leaflets. The flowers are produced in pendulous racemes 10 to 80 cm long, similar to those of the genus Laburnum, but are purple, violet, pink or white. There is no yellow on the leaves. Flowering is in the spring (just before or as the leaves open) in some Asian species, and in mid to late summer in the American species and W. japonica. The flowers of some species are fragrant, most notably Chinese Wisteria. The seeds are produced in pods similar to those of Laburnum, and, like the seeds of that genus, are poisonous.</p> <p>Wisteria is an extremely hardy plant that is considered an invasive species in many parts of the U.S., especially the Southeast, due to its ability to overtake and choke out other native plant species.</p> <p>Wisteria species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including brown-tail.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>Wisteria, especially Wisteria sinensis, is very hardy and fast-growing. It can grow in fairly poor-quality soils, but prefers fertile, moist, well-drained soil. They thrive in full sun. Wisteria can be propagated via hardwood cutting, softwood cuttings, or seed. However, specimens grown from seed can take decades to bloom; for this reason, gardeners usually grow plants that have been started from rooted cuttings or grafted cultivars known to flower well.[citation needed] Another reason for failure to bloom can be excessive fertilizer (particularly nitrogen). Wisteria has nitrogen fixing capability (provided by Rhizobia bacteria in root nodules), and thus mature plants may benefit from added potassium and phosphate, but not nitrogen. Finally, wisteria can be reluctant to bloom because it has not reached maturity. Maturation may require only a few years, as in Kentucky Wisteria, or nearly twenty, as in Chinese Wisteria. Maturation can be forced by physically abusing the main trunk, root pruning, or drought stress.</p> <p>Wisteria can grow into a mound when unsupported, but is at its best when allowed to clamber up a tree, pergola, wall, or other supporting structure. Whatever the case, the support must be very sturdy, because mature Wisteria can become immensely strong with heavy wrist-thick trunks and stems. These will certainly rend latticework, crush thin wooden posts, and can even strangle large trees. Wisteria allowed to grow on houses can cause damage to gutters, downspouts, and similar structures. Its pendulous racemes are best viewed from below.</p> <p>Wisteria flowers develop in buds near the base of the previous year's growth, so pruning back side shoots to the basal few buds in early spring can enhance the visibility of the flowers. If it is desired to control the size of the plant, the side shoots can be shortened to between 20 and 40 cm long in mid summer, and back to 10 to 20 cm in the fall. Once the plant is a few years old, a relatively compact, free-flowering form can be achieved by pruning off the new tendrils three times during the growing season; in June, July and August, for the northern hemisphere. The flowers of some varieties are edible, and can even be used to make wine. Others are said to be toxic. Careful identification by an expert is strongly recommended before consuming this or any wild plant.</p> <p><strong>Taxonomy</strong></p> <p>The botanist Thomas Nuttall said he named the genus Wisteria in memory of Dr. Caspar Wistar (1761–1818).[1][2] Questioned about the spelling later, Nuttall said it was for "euphony," but his biographer speculated that it may have something to do with Nuttall's friend Charles Jones Wister, Sr., of Grumblethorpe, the grandson of the merchant John Wister.[3] (Some Philadelphia sources state that the plant is named after Wister.)[4] As the spelling is apparently deliberate, there is no justification for changing the genus name under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature.[5] However, some spell the plant's common name "wistaria", and Fowler is decisively for the "wistaria" spelling.</p> <p>Genetic analysis shows Callerya, Afgekia and Wisteria to be each other's closest relatives and quite distinct from other members of the tribe Millettieae. Both have eight chromosomes.</p> <p><strong>In culture</strong></p> <p>Fuji Musumè (藤娘?) or Wisteria Maiden is an Otsu-e (Japanese folk painting in Ōtsu, Shiga) subject thought to have been inspired by popular dances. These paintings were often sold as good-luck charms for marriages. Fuji Musumè is also a famous classical Kabuki dance.</p> <p>In Barbara Kingsolver's novel The Bean Trees, Turtle refers to wisteria vines as bean trees, because the pre-bloomed flower pods are shaped like beans. Later, she and Taylor learn that wisteria is a legume (i.e., is in the bean family) and that wisteria and other legumes engage in symbiotic relationships, just as the book's characters do.</p> <p>In Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Giant Wistaria," the plant becomes both a sign of virility ("'It groweth well, this vine thou broughtest me in the ship, my husband.'") as well as a sign of destruction. A daughter has a child out of wedlock and her parents plan to take her back to the old country while giving the baby to a local town. The daughter hears this and ultimately, drowns the baby. She either hangs herself from the wistaria vines roots growing in the basement or they strangle her and kill her; the story doesn't clarify.</p>
T 46 (10 S)
Wisteria Seeds (Wisteria sinensis) 1.85 - 1

Plant resistant to cold and frost
Rare Black Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys nigra)

Rare Black Bamboo Seeds...

Price €1.95 (SKU: B 2)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Rare Black Bamboo&nbsp;Seeds&nbsp;(Phyllostachys nigra)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The popular &amp; beautiful Black Bamboo with jet black culms &amp; feathery green leaves</p> <div>can grow to an average of 25' in most climates.&nbsp;Although sometimes erroneously reported as a clumping bamboo,&nbsp;it is a runner that starts slow but then can become vigorous when mature.</div> <div>The recommended zones are 7-10 although it will reach approx. 16' in zone 6 &amp; will grow in zone 5 in a very well protected location although the growth will probably be spindly.</div> <div>An awesome choice to grow indoors!</div> <div>&nbsp;Very exotic, it has a dramatic straight upright habit growing 6-10' in a pot but can be easily pruned to keep shorter. Locate in sunniest window, feed and water amply during the growth period &amp; summer outdoors (protect from strong winds).</div> <div>Soak your seeds in about 85° F (30° C) water for 24 hours. Make sure it doesn’t get too hot, as temperatures over 105° F (40° C) can kill your seeds. Cooler temperatures however, will not hurt the seeds, but may delay germination by a few days.</div> <div>5</div> <div>Use a skewer or chopstick to open and rough up the top part of the peat pellets.</div> <div>6</div> <div>Put only one seed in the middle of each pellet. Because bamboo seeds are rare and expensive, you don't want to risk having two sprout in the same pellet and have to lose one of them.</div> <div>7</div> <div>Add a small amount of “seedling mix�? type potting soil over the top of your seeds. 1/8 to ¼ inch (2 to 5 mm) is enough.</div> <div>8</div> <div>Put the mini greenhouse in a location where it will get medium shade. An east-facing window is good if the weather outside is cold, or a moderately shady area outside if the weather is good. NOTE: Wherever you put it, it should not get too much direct sun. Even a mini greenhouse can quickly get up to seed killing temperatures in hot direct sun.</div> <div>9</div> <div>Check on the greenhouse daily, as the peat pellets can dry out quickly once the water from main soak evaporates. Before the seeds sprout, they can survive getting too dry once or so. But as soon as they sprout, they can die in a matter of hours if they dry out. If the peat pellets start getting too dry, use a spray bottle to dampen them again. You may need as much as a whole squirt per pellet to dampen to the interior of the pellet.</div> <div>10</div> <div>You may see a sprout within 10 days from planting, though the bulk of germination will occur after at least 15 or 20 days. Different species have different germination rates, so don’t get disappointed too soon.</div> <div>11</div> <div>If any of the sprouts get tall enough to touch the plastic dome lid while others are still getting started, prop the lid up as necessary to prevent the leaves from touching it… Any leaves resting against the lid will quickly rot and risk killing the seedling.</div> <div>12</div> <div>After about 30 days, most of the seeds that are going to sprout with this method will have done so. Transplant all of the healthy sprouts into 4�? (or half-liter) pots using the next few steps. But don’t discard the rest of the seeds yet, as we will jar a few more into action by changing the conditions for them.</div> <div>13</div> <div>Mix a good potting soil with about 50% small bark-chip mulch. This makes a potting mix with very high drainage that is good for bamboo.</div> <div>14</div> <div>Put a little (1/2 inch or 1 cm minimum) of this potting mix into the pots.</div> <div>15</div> <div>Move each pellet that has a sprout into a pot and fill around it so that the pellet is buried at least ¼ inch below the potting soil.</div> <div>16</div> <div>Give the pots a good dose of water. Because of the really good drainage, don’t worry too much about over watering.</div> <div>17</div> <div>Set these pots in an outdoor location that gets about 50% shade and that never gets full hot direct sun for more than a few minutes at a time. These seedlings are now well on their way. You will likely lose another 10% of them for no apparent reason at all, but the rest will have a good chance at making it to maturity.</div> <div>18</div> <div>Go back to the tray of remaining un-sprouted seeds and put the plastic lid aside. Store it for future use if you want, but these seeds and seedlings have no more use for it.</div> <div>19</div> <div>If your mini-greenhouse tray has a removable plastic liner that helps organize the pellets, take it out and make several drainage holes in the bottom of the unlined tray.</div> <div>20</div> <div>Put all of the pellets back in without the liner. Space them roughly evenly, and keep them the same side up as before… Seeds to the top.</div> <div>21</div> <div>Fill in around the pellets with seedling mix type potting soil, and mound it up to cover the top of the pellets by about ¼ inch (5mm).</div> <div>22</div> <div>Place this tray outside in the medium to full sun, checking it daily to keep it damp but not too wet. Because of removing the dome and the increased sun, expect to need to water nearly every day. It is probably helpful to switch to a regular watering can at this point, as you can give it a more normal dose of water.</div> <div>23</div> <div>Hopefully, you will see a whole new set of seedlings start to come up over the next few weeks. As these start to look ready, take them back to step 12 and get them transplanted.</div>
B 2 (5 S)
Rare Black Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys nigra)

Giant plant (with giant fruits)
Voacanga africana Seeds

Voacanga africana Seeds

Price €1.95 (SKU: MHS 69)
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Voacanga africana Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><em>Voacanga Africana</em> is a tropical tree native to West Africa and is related to plants of the genus Tabernanthe or Iboga.</p> <p>Grows erect and robust usually reach a height of 3-4 meters and the bark is pale brown. Its leaves about 30 cm are bright, opposite and ovoid, with short petioles or absent. Its flowers are white or yellow, usually begin to bloom between February and April, fired a strong aroma and the fruit contains many brown seeds ellipsoids. The root is erect and branching. The fruit of Voacanga tends to occur during the summer months between June and September, depending on the country.</p> <p><strong>Effects and applications of Voaganca</strong></p> <p>At present the <em>Voacanga Africana</em> has industrial (production of latex) and medicinal applications. West African shamans used the bark of this tree as a brain stimulant, the roots were used as a stimulant during long hunts, while the seeds were used with visionary purposes.</p> <p>The seeds of the <em>Voacanga Africana</em> contain indole alkaloids, including voacangine (carbomethoxy-ibogaine), voacamina and related substances.</p> <p>Voacangine, C<sub>22</sub>H<sub>29</sub>N<sub>2</sub>O<sub>3</sub> (12-methoxyibogamine-18-carboxylic acid methyl ester) CAS: 510-22-5</p> <h2><strong>Cultivation of Voacanga africana</strong></h2> <p>In the tropical forest is preferably grown in rich soil and somewhat protected from the sun and frost places.</p> <p>The seeds must be sterilized water leaving 10 minutes with a 6% hydrogen peroxide. The use of a specific enraizador are advised to ensure germination.</p> <p>For planting it is best to use a mixture of sandy soil, and seeds bury about 8-10 mm deep (about twice the diameter of the seed). The soil should be kept moist but not waterlogged and the environment should be warm to promote germination.</p> <p>There must be good air circulation after germination to avoid fungal attacks.</p> <p>It likes partial sun until well established, then when they are more mature may be at more sunny places. After three or four months after germination, the plant will be established enough for transplant to their final location.</p> <p>The plant needs adequate space to develop its roots, so the planting distance is 3 meters between plants.</p> <p>Harvesting <em>Voacanga africana</em></p> <p>When the fruit is ripe, with a characteristic brown color, you can be cut directly from the ground without waiting for fall. After collecting the fruit bush, you need to be transported to where it can be left to mature. The fruit needs to mature in dry conditions.</p> <p>When the fruit is fully ripe it opens and you can see the seeds inside.</p> <p>When the fruit opens naturally, the seeds inside are extracted and begin to dry until they are loose, at which carried an open space until just dry. A separate dry powder and time when to be marketed is provided in an amount suitable for transportation profitable.</p> <p> Medicinal uses</p> <p>A number of these compounds have pharmaceutical uses.<sup>[3]</sup> Of particular pharmaceutical interest is voacangine, which is a common precursor in the semi-synthesis of the anti-addiction medication ibogaine. Small amounts of ibogaine are found in <em>Voacanga Africana</em> root bark but not in sufficient quantity to have much medicinal effect.</p>
MHS 69 (10 S)
Voacanga africana Seeds
Key lime seeds (Citrus...

Key lime seeds (Citrus...

Price €2.25 (SKU: V 119 CAKL)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Key lime seeds (Citrus aurantiifolia)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 2 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">The<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Key lime</b><span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Citrus</i><span>&nbsp;</span>×<span>&nbsp;</span><i>aurantiifolia</i>) is a<span>&nbsp;</span>citrus hybrid<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>C. hystrix</i><span>&nbsp;</span>x<span>&nbsp;</span><i>C. medica</i>) with a spherical fruit, 25–50&nbsp;mm (1–2&nbsp;in) in diameter. The Key lime is usually picked while it is still green, but it becomes yellow when ripe.</p> <p style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;">The Key lime is smaller, seedier, has higher acidity, stronger aroma, and thinner<span>&nbsp;</span>rind<span>&nbsp;</span>than the<span>&nbsp;</span>Persian lime<span>&nbsp;</span>(<i>Citrus × latifolia</i>). It is valued for its characteristic flavor. The name comes from its association with the<span>&nbsp;</span>Florida Keys, where it is best known as the<span>&nbsp;</span>flavoring<span>&nbsp;</span>ingredient in<span>&nbsp;</span>Key lime pie. It is also known as<span>&nbsp;</span><b>West Indian lime</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>bartender's lime</b>,<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Omani lime</b>, or<span>&nbsp;</span><b>Mexican lime</b>, the last classified as a distinct<span>&nbsp;</span>race<span>&nbsp;</span>with a thicker skin and darker green color. Philippine varieties have various names, including<span>&nbsp;</span><i><b>dayap</b></i><span>&nbsp;</span>and<span>&nbsp;</span><i>bilolo</i>.</p> <h2 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.5em;"><span class="mw-headline" id="Description">Description</span></h2> <p><i>C. aurantiifolia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>is a shrubby tree, to 5&nbsp;m (16&nbsp;ft), with many<span>&nbsp;</span>thorns. Dwarf varieties exist that can be grown indoors during winter months and in colder climates. Its trunk, which rarely grows straight, has many branches, and they often originate quite far down on the trunk. The leaves are ovate, 25–90&nbsp;mm (1–<span class="frac nowrap">3<span class="visualhide">&nbsp;</span><sup style="font-size: 11.2px;">1</sup>⁄<sub style="font-size: 11.2px;">2</sub></span>&nbsp;in) long, resembling<span>&nbsp;</span>orange<span>&nbsp;</span>leaves (the scientific name<span>&nbsp;</span><i>aurantiifolia</i><span>&nbsp;</span>refers to this resemblance to the leaves of the orange,<span>&nbsp;</span><i>Citrus aurantium</i>). The<span>&nbsp;</span>flowers<span>&nbsp;</span>are 25 mm (1 in) in diameter, are yellowish-white with a light purple tinge on the margins. Flowers and fruit appear throughout the year but are most abundant from May to September in the Northern Hemisphere.<sup id="cite_ref-purdue1_5-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup></p> <p>Skin contact can sometimes cause<span>&nbsp;</span>phytophotodermatitis,<sup id="cite_ref-Weber_et_al._1999_6-0" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><sup id="cite_ref-7" class="reference" style="font-size: 11.2px;"></sup><span>&nbsp;</span>which makes the skin especially sensitive to<span>&nbsp;</span>ultraviolet<span>&nbsp;</span>light.</p> <h3 style="color: #000000; font-size: 1.2em;"><strong><span class="mw-headline" id="Cultivation_and_propagation">Cultivation and propagation</span></strong></h3> <div class="thumb tright" style="color: #202122; font-size: 14px;"><span>There are various approaches to the cultivation of Key limes. This variety of&nbsp;</span>citrus<span>&nbsp;can be propagated from seed and will grow true to the parent.<br><span>If the plants are propagated from seed, the seeds should be stored at least 5–6 months before planting.</span></span></div>
V 119 CAKL
Key lime seeds (Citrus aurantiifolia)
Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose...

Price €2.35 (SKU: T 25 (1g))
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 1g (+-10) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Argyreia nervosa is a perennial climbing vine that is native to the Indian subcontinent and introduced to numerous areas worldwide, including Hawaii, Africa, and the Caribbean. Though it can be invasive, it is often prized for its aesthetic value. Common names include Hawaiian Baby Woodrose, Adhoguda अधोगुडा or Vidhara विधारा (Sanskrit), Elephant Creeper and Woolly Morning Glory. There are two botanical varieties: Argyreia nervosavar. nervosa described here, and Argyrea nervosa var. speciosa, a species used in ayurvedic medicine, but with little to no psychoactive value.</p> <p>Hawaiian Baby Woodrose seeds may be consumed for their various ergoline alkaloids, such as Lysergic acid amide, which can produce psychedelic effects.</p> <p><strong>History</strong></p> <p>The plant is a rare example of a plant whose hallucinogenic properties were not recognized until recent times. While its cousins in the Convolvulaceae family, such as the Rivea corymbosa (Ololiuhqui) and Ipomoea tricolor (Tlitliltzin), were used in shamanic rituals of Latin America for centuries, the Hawaiian Baby Woodrose was not traditionally recognized as a hallucinogen. Its properties were first brought to attention in the 1960s, despite the fact that the chemical composition of its seeds is nearly identical to those of the two species mentioned above, and the seeds contain the highest concentration of psychoactive compounds in the entire family.</p> <p><strong>Seeds</strong></p> <p>In most countries, it is legal to purchase, sell or germinate Argyreia nervosa seeds, but they are generally unapproved for human consumption. Depending on the country, it may be illegal to buy seeds with the intention to consume them, and several countries have outlawed ergine-containing seeds altogether. In Australia, retailers are required to treat their seeds with chemicals to discourage consumption, and it is illegal to buy or possess untreated seeds.</p> <p><strong>Extracted chemicals</strong></p> <p>Extracting ergine from Argyreia speciosa seeds is illegal in the USA since it is a scheduled substance. It is classified as a schedule III depressant by the DEA, although the substance has hallucinogenic/psychedelic properties.</p> <p>Extracts</p> <p>In an animal model of ulcers in rats, large doses of the extract of Argyreia speciosa leaves (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight) showed dose-dependent antiulcer activity and cured the Ulcers.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
T 25 (1g)
Hawaiian Baby Woodrose Seeds (Argyreia nervosa) 1.95 - 1
Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media) 1.55 - 1

Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria...

Price €1.95 (SKU: MHS 81)
,
5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><strong>Price for Package of 100 (0,046 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Stellaria media, chickweed, is a cool-season annual plant native to Europe, but naturalized in many parts of North America. It is used as a cooling herbal remedy, and grown as a vegetable crop and ground cover for both human consumption and poultry. It is sometimes called common chickweed to distinguish it from other plants called chickweed. Other common names include chickenwort, craches, maruns, winterweed. The plant germinates in autumn or late winter, then forms large mats of foliage. Flowers are small and white, followed quickly by the seed pods. This plant flowers and sets seed at the same time.</p> <p>Stellaria media is widespread in North America, Europe and Asia. There are several closely related plants referred to as chickweed, but which lack the culinary properties of plants in the genus Stellaria. Plants in the genus Cerastium are very similar in appearance to Stellaria and are in the same family (Carophyllaceae). Stellaria media can be easily distinguished from all other members of this family by examining the stems. Stellaria has fine hairs on only one side of the stem in a single band and on the sepals.[1] Other members of the family Carophyllaceae which resemble Stellaria have hairs uniformly covering the entire stem. It usually has 3 stamens[1] other references indicate 5 stamens[2] and 3 - 8 in other references.</p> <p>The larvae of the European moth yellow shell (Camptogramma bilineata), of North American moths pale-banded dart (Agnorisma badinodis) or dusky cutworm (Agrotis venerabilis) or North American butterfly dainty sulphur (Nathalis iole) all feed on chickweed.</p> <p>In both Europe and North America this plant is common in gardens,[4] fields, and disturbed grounds. Control is difficult due to the heavy seed sets. Common Chickweed is very competitive with small grains, and can produce up to 80% yield losses among barley.</p> <h2><strong><em>Uses</em></strong></h2> <h2><strong>As food</strong></h2> <p>Stellaria media is edible and nutritious, and is used as a leaf vegetable, often raw in salads. It is one of the ingredients of the symbolic dish consumed in the Japanese spring-time festival, Nanakusa-no-sekku.</p> <h3><strong>Toxicity</strong></h3> <p>S. media contains plant chemicals known as saponins, which can be toxic when consumed in large quantities. Chickweed has been known to cause saponin poisoning in cattle. However, as the animal must consume several kilos of chickweed in order to reach a toxic level, such deaths are rare.</p> <p><strong>In folk medicine</strong></p> <p>The plant has medicinal purposes and is used in folk medicine. It has been used as a remedy to treat itchy skin conditions and pulmonary diseases.[7] 17th century herbalist John Gerard recommended it as a remedy for mange. Modern herbalists prescribe it for iron-deficiency anemia (for its high iron content), as well as for skin diseases, bronchitis, rheumatic pains, arthritis and period pain.[8] Not all of these uses are supported by scientific evidence.</p>
MHS 81 (0,046 g)
Chickweed Seeds (Stellaria Media) 1.55 - 1

Giant plant (with giant fruits)
Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth 1.85 - 1

Giant Sunflower Seeds -...

Price €1.85 (SKU: VE 68)
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth</strong></h2> <h3><span style="color: #ff0000;" class=""><b style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of </b><font color="#ff0000"><b>1g (10), 9g (100)</b></font><b style="color: #ff0000;">&nbsp;seeds.</b></span></h3> <p>This popular and easy to grow Giant Russian Mammoth Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Organic Heirloom Variety.</p> <p>These plants make beautiful flowers that produce tasty, edible seeds. Stalks can grow to 8-12 feet (2.1-3.7 meters) with Giant flowers. Will tolerate poorer quality soils.</p> <p>Sow seed after danger of frost in an area that receives full sun. Sow seed 8 inches apart and about 1 inch deep. Thin seedlings when they are 3 inches tall so that the final spacing is 15 inches apart. They bloom during summer.</p>
VE 68 (1g)
Giant Sunflower Seeds - Giant Russian Mammoth 1.85 - 1

Giant plant (with giant fruits)

Variety from Peru
Worlds Largest Giant Corn...

Worlds Largest Giant Corn...

Price €2.25 (SKU: P 279)
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Native to Peru and Ecuador Peruvian Giant Corn - also known as Choclo is a hideously large variety of corn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The stalks reach up to 5 - 5,50 meters in height, a runt in a litter of this cultivar would tower over standard varieties at a whopping 4 metars.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">In standard varieties of corn the average weight runs from 25 - 35 grams per 100 kernels In Peruvian Giant Corn the weight per 100 kernels runs from 90 - 95 grams per 100 kernels - that's nearly 3 times the size and yield.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">It is a late maturing corn and is estimated to need 120 - 150 days to mature. They are not an easy crop to produce, it requires determination and vigilance to grow.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">One would think being indigenous to the Andes mountainous they would be adapted to windy conditions, but this is not the case. They evolved in the Peruvian Urrabamba Valley and vicinity which is sheltered and has relatively mild weather.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Peruvian Giant Corn aka Choclo </span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">They do not withstand strong winds and need persistent staking, at 4 - 5,50 metars in height that's a chore and a half.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The plants produce numerous relatively short cobs with gigundous kernels.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">The taste is comparable to standard sweet corn. It is not overly sweet - mild to blandly sweet with a creamy texture would be the best description. Peruvians usually boil them. In Ecuador and Bolivia they dry them first then burst or "pop" them in oil - somewhat like popcorn. We gringos can enjoy them the same as any other corn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn Should be planted in blocks as opposed to rows and should not be planted near other varieties of Corn [See - Isolating Sweet Corn.] Cross pollination tends to produce poor tasting starchy corn. Sugar Pearl, as per some suppliers does not need to be isolated as other varieties do - this is just fine for the Sugar Pearl, but not necessarily the other variety.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Peruvian Giant Corn can be seeded directly into the soil, or it can also be started indoors and later transplanted. If starting indoors be sure you have a larger than standard container as it could easily outgrow the container before transplant time. Whichever you choose, Plant it in blocks, at least four rows wide, for proper pollination and well-filled ears</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Sowing depth Aprox.: 5 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Germination: 6 to 8 days</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Maturity: at 120 - 150 days.</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Color: White - Pale Yellow</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Seed Spacing: 30-35 cm apart.</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Row spacing: 100 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">USDA Hardiness Zones: 3- 9</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Plant Size: 400 - 550 cm</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn cob Size: 17-20 cm Long</span><br /><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Full Sun</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Above Average Yields per Sq. Footage - Anticipate 3 or more ears per Stalk.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Corn has shallow roots, and uses a lot of nitrogen as well as trace elements. To help your crop get off to the best start possible, prepare the soil first with a nitrogen-rich fertilizer. Well rotted manure or compost is also helpful.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 14pt; font-family: georgia, palatino, serif; color: #000000;">Plant in the northern side of the garden as corn stalks will deny sunlight to the rest of your garden crops ,you also might want to grow some where it will provide shade to plants that can not tolerate full sunlight.</span></p> <div> <h2><a href="https://www.seeds-gallery.shop/en/home/peruvian-giant-red-sacsa-kuski-corn-seeds.html" target="_blank" title="Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds, you can buy HERE" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Peruvian Giant Red Sacsa Kuski Corn Seeds, you can buy HERE</strong></a></h2> </div> </body> </html>
P 279 5S NS
Worlds Largest Giant Corn Seeds Cuzco - Cusco
Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds 1.85 - 1

Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds

Price €3.00 (SKU: V 18 PCX)
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5/ 5
<h2 class=""><strong>Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Passiflora colinvauxii or Colinvaux's Passion Flower. This Rare Passiflora climber is under threat in its natural habitat and is one of 45 Passiflora listed in The 1997 IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants. It is listed as rare. This plant is an extremely prolific bloomer who likes to live in partial shade.</p> <p>It smells like honeysuckle and attracts bees and butterflies. It is a fast-growing climber with bi-lobed leaves 7-16 cm. It flowers profusely in summer which will attract bees.</p> <p>The flowers are medium in size. The sepals and petals are white. The corona consists of a series of filaments, purple with white ends.</p> <p>The fruits are oval, 2-4 cm long, and 1-1.5 cm wide.</p> <p>It is found on the famous Galapagos Islands where it was discovered in 1966, but it probably traveled there from Ecuador.</p> <p>USDA Hardiness Zones 10 to 11</p> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Seeds / Cuttings</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>about 24-48 hours soak in warm water</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>all year round</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>0.5 cm</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>25 ° C +</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>2-4 Weeks</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span>Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br><span><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> <script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
V 18 PCX (3 S)
Passiflora colinvauxii Seeds 1.85 - 1
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds

Black Strawberry Seeds -...

Price €2.25 (SKU: V 1)
,
5/ 5
<h2>Black Strawberry Seeds - Exotic Rare</h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;">Price for Package of 10 seeds.</span></h2> <p><strong style="color:#ff0000;font-size:18px;"></strong>A lovely Black Strawberry that is fully hardy. Perfect for small spaces or containers, it will produce an abundance of small sweet fruit, with a hint of pineapple.</p> <p>Heavy cropping and easy to grow.</p> <p>Perennial herb densely clustered with straighter branches.15-25cm in height. Cymose anthotaxy with juicy flesh. Require loosing and weeding at intervals on the loose fertile soil with ample organic fertilizers. Favor to warm and need moisture to live through the winter.</p> <div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <h3 align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></h3> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Needs Light to germinate! Just sprinkle on the surface of the substrate + gently press</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">20-25°C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">1 - 8 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> </td> <td valign="top"> <p align="center"><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><p> </p> </div> </div>
V 1
Exotic Rare Black Strawberry Seeds

Variety from Japan
Yubari King Melon Seeds The most expensive fruit on the World 7.45 - 1

Yubari King Melon Seeds

Price €4.95 (SKU: V 2)
,
5/ 5
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> <h2><strong>Yubari King Melon Seeds The most expensive fruit on the World</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5, 10, 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>TOKYO A remarkably sweet canteloupe auctioned in Japan fetched a record $12,000, making it one of the most expensive canteloupes ever sold in the country.</p> <p>In a society where melons are a luxury item commonly given as gifts the jaw-dropping auction last month shocked everyone! At that auction, a pair of "Yubari" cantaloupe melons sold for a record $23,500. Wikipedia Yubari</p> <p>A pair of cantaloupes from the bankrupt city of Yubari, Hokkaido, fetched a whopping 2 million yen at the first auction of the season at the Sapporo central wholesale market, the Japan Agricultural Cooperative's Yubari unit said. The price paid by Marui Imai Inc., a Sapporo-based department store, for the upmarket produce surpassed the previous record of 800,000 yen for two cantaloupes, JA Yubari said. "Perhaps the city's designation as a financially rehabilitating entity ironically helped generate an advertising effect," said a spokesperson for the former coal town, which went bankrupt last year. "This will encourage the city a lot."</p> <p>The two melons were put on display at Marui Imai's flagship outlet priced at 1 million yen apiece. Yoshikazu Hoshino, 59, a purchasing officer at the department store, said the cantaloupes were more for publicity than profit. "We were bullish in the bidding because we're celebrating our 135th anniversary this year. We wanted as many customers as possible to see them," he said. One of the million-yen fruits has already been sold, the store said. Other shoppers were stunned by the price.</p> <p>"It's not a price I can afford," said Ryoko Hino, a 79-year-old shopper.</p> <p>So the Yubari King costs generally from 100 to 1000 € / piece.</p> <p>How to Cultivate Yubari King Melon</p> <p>Side Selection</p> <p>Try to plant in a location that enjoys full sun and remember to water often. Keep in mind when planting that Yubari King is thought of as hardy, so this plant will survive close to or on freezing temperatures.</p> <p>Soil</p> <p>The soil the melons are grown in is volcanic ash. It's not what's in the volcanic soil, but how the soil behaves. It lets growers there easily control the temperature of the soil, and the ash lets water quickly drain through, allowing for the top to remain dry, which promotes the size of the melons. Yubari King needs a potting mix soil with a ph of 6.1 to 7.5 (weakly acidic soil to weakly alkaline soil). You just buy a bag of compost and add it to your soil to feed your plants. It is not only better for them, it is also cheaper.</p> <p>Seeding:</p> <p>Try to aim for a seed spacing of at least 1.89 feet (58.0 cm) and sow at a depth of around 0.5 inches (1.27 cm). Soil temperature should be kept higher than 21°C / 70°F to ensure good germination. By our calculations, you should look at sowing Yubari King about 14 days before your last frost date.</p> <p>Ensure that temperatures are mild and all chance of frost has passed before planting out, as Yubari King is a hardy plant.</p> <p>Planting</p> <p>Melon is planted in February. The first ones are ready to harvest 105 days after planting. The growing season ends in early September. Cutaway any diseased or pest damaged leaves first. This will enable the plant to put all of its energy into making a great Melon instead of making more leaves. Melons are an annual, not a perennial. They can grow more than 1 harvest but the first is always the best but if you have an heirloom and need the extra seed then let more fruit set after your first harvest. DO NOT let fruit set until AFTER your first harvest so all of the plant's energy (sugars) go into the Melon(s) on the vine.</p> <p>At long last, to see flowers appearing on the vines, which means melons are on their way! It seems like it takes forever but really it only has been a little over a month or so.</p> <p>Watering and Fertilizer You have covered this in the past but things change when the melons start to grow. You should water them every other day if your soil is well-drained. Keep an eye on the top of the soil and water when the top is dry to a depth of about ½ inch. There should never be a fear of overwatering if your soil drains well and containers have holes for excess water to leave from. Remember, very dry soil sheds water like a Ducks back. It will take time for the water to soak into the soil and you will have a lot of run-offs until it rehydrates. Never water with cold water since it will shock the plant a little and may slow growth or development of fruit. You may need to water every other day with 1 gal of water for every 4 cubic feet of growing medium but you might decide that you want to waterless. Your local weather will also play a role.</p> <p>If you started with a soil mix of compost, you should not need to fertilize your plants. You can do, however, like to add ½ tsp of Super Thrive to every 2 gallons of water. This will help them resist pests and develop much stronger. After the fruit gets to the size of a grapefruit You can use only water until harvest.</p> <p>Pollinate</p> <p>Melons will not appear out of anywhere. There needs to be a male and female flower for the Melon to form. The fruit will grow from the female flower. Male flowers are the first to appear on the plant. If you have other Melons growing in your yard then you might consider covering the Ichiba Kouji with a mosquito net to keep bees from pollinating your other melons, especially if they are an heirloom. When the female flowers appear, take a male flower and place it inside the female flower or use a small dust brush and swab the inside of the male flower and then swab the female flower to pollinate. You can also let bees do this for you if you wish. Only 2 Melons (at most) should be grown on the vine at a time. Each plant should yield 4 or more Melons if you let them but they will be smaller and lower quality. “I must sacrifice the others to make the best one possible.” - Japanese Melon Grower The Japanese master growers hand pollinate three flowers and let them get to about the size of a baseball, then select the best one and let only that one grow. The others can be chopped up and added to the compost pile.</p> <p>When Melons burst!</p> <p>The inside of the melon is growing so fast that the outside can’t keep up so a crack forms. At this point, the plant's sugars flow out to cover the crack and heal the melon. This is supposed to happen, in fact, if it doesn’t your doing something wrong. This is what forms the reticulation or netting. The finer the reticulation is, the juicier the inside is.</p> <p>“If the reticulation is great, the inside is great too.” – Japanese Melon Judge</p> <p>If you don’t make good netting, then you don’t make a good melon. This is where art makes an entrance. It is something that you’re going to have to experiment with to get the melon just the way you like them. If you just set it on the ground, then the melon will not form a perfect circle and the netting may be affected, not to mention bugs getting into them. If you put them on a trellis then the juices may not be evenly distributed or may become misshapen or even caught inside the trellis if you’re not careful. This is why you can use them to hang the melon so that it would not be disturbed.</p> <p>Harvesting</p> <p>After the cracking is over with and the melon is healed it is time for the next technique. Several times until you’re ready to harvest, you need to put on some cotton work gloves and rub firmly all around the melon. You should do this twice a week. For example Monday and Thursday. The reason for doing this is to make the Melon sweeter.</p> <p>“This is called Tama Fuki. It stimulates the melon and adds sweetness.” – Japanese Melon Grower</p> <p>Melons are hard to tell when they are ripe. They stay green and on the vine. So how do you know when they are ready? </p> <p>    1. The stem is “green and strong” (dry)</p> <p>     2. The bottom of the Melon is “flexible” (slightly soft)</p> <p>     3. It should feel heavier than it looks.</p> <p>     4. You should smell the Melon aroma when in close proximity.</p> <p>Pest and Diseases:</p> <p>Quality</p> <p>To most Americans, your melon will taste just like a regular melon. A really good melon but unless they know what they have in their hands then they will most likely overlook the quality. Only when they bite into a regular store-bought melon will they realize what they once held. The quality of your melon can be seen without cutting it open. If you look at a store-bought melon, you will see that the “netting” or reticulation is very fine or small. A great melon will have more pronounced or thicker lines in the reticulation. This quality level depends mostly on the watering schedule that is set. Personally we found that watering every other day to work best in my area but that may change depending on your climate. Remember that melons come from a desert environment. We wish you luck in your melon growing adventures!</p>
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Yubari King Melon Seeds The most expensive fruit on the World 7.45 - 1

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<h2><strong>Giant strawberry seeds</strong></h2> <h2 style="font-size: 2rem;"><strong><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 100 (0.06g) seeds.</span></strong></h2> <p>Strawberries, Fragaria ananassa L. Maximus, are quite easy to grow! They are perennial, winter hardy, and will thrive in full sunshine, as long as the soil is fertile and well-drained. Healthy plants will produce an abundance of berries for years! Strawberries are as big as apples! This standard "GIANT" type will provide you with the largest crop! These everbearing Giants will produce throughout the summer for Best desserts and snacks!</p> <p>Strawberries need light to germinate and their seeds shouldn't be covered. But practice has shown that uncovered strawberry seeds dry out very quickly during germination. I, therefore, recommend covering the seed very lightly with sieved seeding soil. After sowing and moistening, you can also place a glass pane on the sowing tray.</p> <p>Seeds need at least 60 days of stratification.</p><script src="//cdn.public.n1ed.com/G3OMDFLT/widgets.js"></script>
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